Abysses Quotes

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a-childs-fear-is-world-whose-dark-corners-are-quite-unknown-to-grownup-people-it-has-its-sky-its-abysses-sky-without-stars-abysses-into-which-no-light-can-ever-penetrate
he-who-is-not-bird-should-not-build-his-nest-over-abysses-friedrich-nietzsche
for-we-all-have-our-own-twilights-mists-abysses-to-return-to-sanober-khan
the-mathematical-giant-gauss-who-from-his-lofty-heights-embraces-in-one-view-stars-abysses-farkas-bolyai
yet-whether-to-glory-to-shame-human-nature-in-what-we-call-pleasure-with-excess-scorn-perhaps-there-are-abysses-as-deep-as-those-love-jules-barbey-daurevilly
the-voice-sea-is-seductive-never-ceasing-whispering-clamoring-murmuring-inviting-soul-to-wander-in-abysses-solitude-kate-chopin
i-wish-there-were-shortcuts-to-wisdom-selfknowledge-cuter-abysses-threeday-spa-wilderness-experiences-sadly-it-doesnt-work-that-way-i-resent-this-anne-lamott
sit-down-before-fact-as-little-child-be-prepared-to-give-up-every-conceived-notion-follow-humbly-wherever-whatever-abysses-nature-leads-you-will-thomas-huxley
my-acquaintances-arent-worth-aqua-i-drink-after-they-leave-me-thirsting-for-something-more-meaningful-i-dont-want-refillable-relationshipsi-want-connections-deep-they-are-black-a
after-all-who-would-put-up-with-all-late-nights-sacrifices-selfadmitted-manic-moodiness-such-long-arduous-journey-with-seemingly-limitless-peaks-equally-bottomless-abysses-ken-po
we-are-stratified-creatures-creatures-full-abysses-with-soul-inconstant-quicksilver-with-mind-whose-color-shape-change-as-in-kaleidoscope-that-pascal-mercier
the-two-friends-went-on-on-toward-sierra-at-times-keeping-highway-at-times-deviating-from-it-whenever-they-passed-through-town-hamlet-slow-peal-bells-tolling-deathknell-announced
Faith is always coveted most and needed most urgently where will is lacking; for will, as the affect of command, is the decisive sign of sovereignty and strength. In other words, the less one knows how to command, the more urgently one covets someone who commands, who commands severely-a god, prince, class, physician, father confessor, dogma, or party conscience. From this one might perhaps gather that the two world religions, Buddhism and Christianity, may have owed their origin and above all their sudden spread to a tremendous collapse and disease of the will. And that is what actually happened: both religions encountered a situation in which the will had become diseased, giving rise to a demand that had become utterly desperate for some "thou shalt." Both religions taught fanaticism in ages in which the will had become exhausted, and thus they offered innumerable people some support, a new possibility of willing, some delight in willing. For fanaticism is the only "strength of the will" that even the weak and insecure can be brought to attain, being a sort of hypnotism of the whole system of the senses and the intellect for the benefit of an excessive nourishment (hypertrophy) of a single point of view and feeling that henceforth becomes dominant- which the Christian calls his faith. Once a human being reaches the fundamental conviction that he must be commanded, he becomes "a believer." Conversely, one could conceive of such a pleasure and power of self-determination, such a freedom of the will [ This conception of "freedom of the will" ( alias, autonomy) does not involve any belief in what Nietzsche called "the superstition of free will" in section 345 ( alias, the exemption of human actions from an otherwise universal determinism).] that the spirit would take leave of all faith and every wish for certainty, being practiced in maintaining himself on insubstantial ropes and possibilities and dancing even near abysses. Such a spirit would be the free spirit par excellence.

Friedrich Nietzsche
faith-is-always-coveted-most-needed-most-urgently-where-will-is-lacking-for-will-as-affect-command-is-decisive-sign-sovereignty-strength-in-other-words-less-one-knows-how-to-comm
The 1950s and 1960s: philosophy, psychology, myth There was considerable critical interest in Woolf 's life and work in this period, fuelled by the publication of selected extracts from her diaries, in A Writer's Diary (1953), and in part by J. K. Johnstone's The Bloomsbury Group (1954). The main critical impetus was to establish a sense of a unifying aesthetic mode in Woolf 's writing, and in her works as a whole, whether through philosophy, psychoanalysis, formal aesthetics, or mythopoeisis. James Hafley identified a cosmic philosophy in his detailed analysis of her fiction, The Glass Roof: Virginia Woolf as Novelist (1954), and offered a complex account of her symbolism. Woolf featured in the influential The English Novel: A Short Critical History (1954) by Walter Allen who, with antique chauvinism, describes the Woolfian 'moment' in terms of 'short, sharp female gasps of ecstasy, an impression intensified by Mrs Woolf 's use of the semi-colon where the comma is ordinarily enough'. Psychological and Freudian interpretations were also emerging at this time, such as Joseph Blotner's 1956 study of mythic patterns in To the Lighthouse, an essay that draws on Freud, Jung and the myth of Persephone.4 And there were studies of Bergsonian writing that made much of Woolf, such as Shiv Kumar's Bergson and the Stream of Consciousness Novel (1962). The most important work of this period was by the French critic Jean Guiguet. His Virginia Woolf and Her Works (1962); translated by Jean Stewart, 1965) was the first full-length study ofWoolf 's oeuvre, and it stood for a long time as the standard work of critical reference in Woolf studies. Guiguet draws on the existentialism of Jean-Paul Sartre to put forward a philosophical reading of Woolf; and he also introduces a psychobiographical dimension in the non-self.' This existentialist approach did not foreground Woolf 's feminism, either. his heavy use of extracts from A Writer's Diary. He lays great emphasis on subjectivism in Woolf 's writing, and draws attention to her interest in the subjective experience of 'the moment.' Despite his philosophical apparatus, Guiguet refuses to categorise Woolf in terms of any one school, and insists that Woolf has indeed 'no pretensions to abstract thought: her domain is life, not ideology'. Her avoidance of conventional character makes Woolf for him a 'purely psychological' writer.5 Guiguet set a trend against materialist and historicist readings ofWoolf by his insistence on the primacy of the subjective and the psychological: 'To exist, for Virginia Woolf, meant experiencing that dizziness on the ridge between two abysses of the unknown, the self and

Jane Goldman
the-1950s-1960s-philosophy-psychology-myth-there-was-considerable-critical-interest-in-woolf-s-life-work-in-this-period-fuelled-by-publication-selected-extracts-from-her-diaries-
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