Aimlessly Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
there-is-no-sweeter-pleasure-than-wandering-aimlessly-about-marty-rubin
a-wind-that-blows-aimlessly-is-no-good-to-anyone-rick-riordan
i-have-decided-that-every-command-calls-for-me-to-run-around-aimlessly
two-things-were-impossible-to-him-to-stand-still-to-move-aimlessly-ayn-rand
as-for-those-who-do-not-believe-in-hereafter-we-made-their-deeds-appear-good-to-them-they-wander-aimlessly-naml-4
threequarters-soldiers-life-is-spent-in-aimlessly-waiting-about-eugen-rosenstockhuessy
facebook-is-like-a-fridge-even-though-you-know-nothing-new-is-going-on-you-still-go-and-aimlessly-check-every-ten-minutes
until-there-was-you-i-wandered-aimlessly-for-long-time-like-little-child-i-will-cry-in-anticipation-you-ko-joonhee
goals-keep-you-motivated-they-give-you-direction-that-way-youre-not-just-aimlessly-training-doing-too-much-one-thing-not-enough-another-helen-jenkins
some-people-keep-wandering-aimlessly-from-womb-to-tomb-they-seek-nothing-achieve-nothingrvm-rvm
i-aimlessly-travel-meaning-i-have-no-agenda-other-than-to-get-small-in-the-world-be-quiet-and-observe-people
he-said-it-is-forbidden-for-them-for-forty-years-they-will-wander-aimlessly-in-land-so-do-not-grieve-over-defiant-people-almaidah-26
i-hope-the-snowstorm-doesnt-impact-my-schedule-of-aimlessly-wasting-my-day-online
aimlessly-it-pounds-shore-white-aimless-signals-no-one-listens-to-poetry-from-thing-language-jack-spicer
you-wouldnt-get-in-car-drive-around-aimlessly-hoping-to-eventually-arrive-at-pleasant-destination-so-why-would-you-even-consider-doing-this-for-your-business-koos-kruger
wandering-aimlessly-through-life-in-sort-bliss-is-like-using-compass-without-directional-needle-tom-baker-tom-baker-aka-the-pondering-man
to-lose-our-connection-with-body-is-to-become-spiritually-homeless-without-anchor-we-float-aimlessly-battered-by-winds-waves-life-anodea-judith
so-many-words-get-lost-they-leave-mouth-lose-their-courage-wandering-aimlessly-until-they-are-swept-into-gutter-like-dead-leaves-nicole-krauss
i-was-not-atheist-few-people-really-are-for-that-means-blind-faith-in-strange-proposition-that-this-universe-originated-in-cipher-aimlessly-rushes-nowhere-bill-wilson
we-can-if-we-choose-wander-aimlessly-over-continent-arbitrary-rootless-as-some-winged-seed-blown-about-on-serendipitous-spring-breeze-haruki-murakami
aimlessly-rushing-leaves-you-with-nothing-you-need-some-loving-to-make-you-feel-alive-in-less-than-moment-life-can-be-stolen-i-know-where-im-going-richard-marx
respect-wealth-property-friendship-even-love-did-i-expect-to-simply-fall-over-each-them-as-i-strolled-aimlessly-through-years-was-i-expecting-my-whole-life-to-be-some-form-lucky-
therefore-i-do-not-run-like-man-running-aimlessly-i-do-not-fight-like-man-beating-air-1-corinthians-926
it-is-better-to-follow-out-plan-consistently-even-if-it-isnt-best-one-than-to-play-without-plan-at-all-the-worst-thing-is-to-wander-about-aimlessly-alexander-kotov
for-some-life-journey-has-just-started-for-some-it-is-about-to-end-but-in-truth-there-is-no-start-there-is-no-end-there-is-just-ocean-particles-playing-aimlessly-mehmet-murat-ild
you-have-been-hiding-long-aimlessly-drifting-in-sea-my-love-even-you-have-always-been-connected-to-me-connected-revealed-in-known-in-unmanifest-rumi
there-are-only-two-rules-one-is-e-m-forsters-guide-to-alexandria-best-way-to-know-alexandria-is-to-wander-aimlessly-the-second-is-from-psalms-grin-jan-morris
the-whole-wood-seemed-running-now-running-hard-hunting-chasing-closing-in-round-something-somebody-in-panic-he-began-to-run-too-aimlessly-he-knew-not-whither
a-line-comes-into-being-it-goes-out-for-walk-to-speak-aimlessly-for-sake-walk-paul-klee
so-many-words-get-lost-they-leave-mouthand-lose-their-courage-wandering-aimlessly-until-they-are-swept-into-gutter-like-dead-leaves-on-rainy-days-nicole-krauss
photojournalism-has-its-tremendous-rewards-its-wonderful-work-in-what-other-work-can-you-wander-aimlessly-with-camera-around-your-neck-armed-only-larry-towell
they-walked-on-rather-aimlessly-he-hoped-she-wouldnt-notice-he-was-touched-because-he-wouldnt-have-known-how-to-explain-why-here-lay-great-discrepancy-between-aesthetic-truth-sle
ducking-cops-aimlessly-bucking-shots-open-one-day-for-lucky-hit-time-fucking-stops-line-up-for-props-im-out-to-get-mine-with-timeseeking-tech9ne-sage-francis
to-speculate-without-facts-is-to-attempt-to-enter-house-which-one-has-not-key-by-wandering-aimlessly-round-round-searching-walls-now-then-peeping-through-windows-facts-are-key-ju
jesus-was-stoned-but-no-rock-hit-him-he-slipped-into-crowd-was-found-later-teaching-on-hill-somewhere-history-tells-us-that-he-did-nothing-wrong-we-sacrificed-him-anyway-the-day-
So many words get lost. They leave the mouth and lose their courage, wandering aimlessly until they are swept into the gutter like dead leaves. On rainy days, you can hear their chorus rushing past: IwasabeautifulgirlPleasedon'tgoItoobelievemybodyismadeofglass-I'veneverlovedanyoneIthinkofmyselfasfunnyForgiveme... There was a time when it wasn't uncommon to use a piece of string to guide words that otherwise might falter on the way to their destinations. Shy people carried a little bunch of string in their pockets, but people considered loudmouths had no less need for it, since those used to being overheard by everyone were often at a loss for how to make themselves heard by someone. The physical distance between two people using a string was often small; sometimes the smaller the distance, the greater the need for the string. The practice of attaching cups to the ends of string came much later. Some say it is related to the irrepressible urge to press shells to our ears, to hear the still-surviving echo of the world's first expression. Others say it was started by a man who held the end of a string that was unraveled across the ocean by a girl who left for America. When the world grew bigger, and there wasn't enough string to keep the things people wanted to say from disappearing into the vastness, the telephone was invented. Sometimes no length of string is long enough to say the thing that needs to be said. In such cases all the string can do, in whatever its form, is conduct a person's silence.

Nicole Krauss
so-many-words-get-lost-they-leave-mouth-lose-their-courage-wandering-aimlessly-until-they-are-swept-into-gutter-like-dead-leaves-on-rainy-days-you-can-hear-their-chorus-rushing-p
Civilized people must, I believe, satisfy the following criteria: 1) They respect human beings as individuals and are therefore always tolerant, gentle, courteous and amenable... They do not create scenes over a hammer or a mislaid eraser; they do not make you feel they are conferring a great benefit on you when they live with you, and they don't make a scandal when they leave. (...) 2) They have compassion for other people besides beggars and cats. Their hearts suffer the pain of what is hidden to the naked eye. (...) 3) They respect other people's property, and therefore pay their debts. 4) They are not devious, and they fear lies as they fear fire. They don't tell lies even in the most trivial matters. To lie to someone is to insult them, and the liar is diminished in the eyes of the person he lies to. Civilized people don't put on airs; they behave in the street as they would at home, they don't show off to impress their juniors. (...) 5) They don't run themselves down in order to provoke the sympathy of others. They don't play on other people's heartstrings to be sighed over and cosseted... that sort of thing is just cheap striving for effects, it's vulgar, old hat and false. (...) 6) They are not vain. They don't waste time with the fake jewellery of hobnobbing with celebrities, being permitted to shake the hand of a drunken [judicial orator], the exaggerated bonhomie of the first person they meet at the Salon, being the life and soul of the bar... They regard prases like 'I am a representative of the Press!!' - the sort of thing one only hears from [very minor journalists] - as absurd. If they have done a brass farthing's work they don't pass it off as if it were 100 roubles' by swanking about with their portfolios, and they don't boast of being able to gain admission to places other people aren't allowed in (...) True talent always sits in the shade, mingles with the crowd, avoids the limelight... As Krylov said, the empty barrel makes more noise than the full one. (...) 7) If they do possess talent, they value it... They take pride in it... they know they have a responsibility to exert a civilizing influence on [others] rather than aimlessly hanging out with them. And they are fastidious in their habits. (...) 8) They work at developing their aesthetic sensibility... Civilized people don't simply obey their baser instincts... they require mens sana in corpore sano. And so on. That's what civilized people are like... Reading Pickwick and learning a speech from Faust by heart is not enough if your aim is to become a truly civilized person and not to sink below the level of your surroundings. [From a letter to Nikolay Chekhov, March 1886]

Anton Chekhov
civilized-people-must-i-believe-satisfy-following-criteria-1-they-respect-human-beings-as-individuals-are-therefore-always-tolerant-gentle-courteous-amenable-they-do-not-create-s
The Idiot. I have read it once, and find that I don't remember the events of the book very well-or even all the principal characters. But mostly the 'portrait of a truly beautiful person' that dostoevsky supposedly set out to write in that book. And I remember how Myshkin seemed so simple when I began the book, but by the end, I realized how I didn't understand him at all. the things he did. Maybe when I read it again it will be different. But the plot of these dostoevsky books can hold such twists and turns for the first-time reader- I guess that's b/c he was writing most of these books as serials that had to have cliffhangers and such. But I make marks in my books, mostly at parts where I see the author's philosophical points standing in the most stark relief. My copy of Moby Dick is positively full of these marks. The Idiot, I find has a few... Part 3, Section 5. The sickly Ippolit is reading from his 'Explanation' or whatever its called. He says his convictions are not tied to him being condemned to death. It's important for him to describe, of happiness: "you may be sure that Columbus was happy not when he had discovered America, but when he was discovering it." That it's the process of life-not the end or accomplished goals in it-that matter. Well. Easier said than lived! Part 3, Section 6. more of Ippolit talking-about a christian mindset. He references Jesus's parable of The Word as seeds that grow in men, couched in a description of how people are interrelated over time; its a picture of a multiplicity. Later in this section, he relates looking at a painting of Christ being taken down from the cross, at Rogozhin's house. The painting produced in him an intricate metaphor of despair over death "in the form of a huge machine of the most modern construction which, dull and insensible, has aimlessly clutched, crushed, and swallowed up a great priceless Being, a Being worth all nature and its laws, worth the whole earth, which was created perhaps solely for the sake of the advent of this Being." The way Ippolit's ideas are configured, here, reminds me of the writings of Gilles Deleuze. And the phrasing just sort of remidns me of the way everyone feels-many people feel crushed by the incomprehensible machine, in life. Many people feel martyred in their very minor ways. And it makes me think of the concept that a narrative religion like Christianity uniquely allows for a kind of socialized or externalized, shared experience of subjectivity. Like, we all know the story of this man-and it feels like our own stories at the same time. Part 4, Section 7. Myshkin's excitement (leading to a seizure) among the Epanchin's dignitary guests when he talks about what the nobility needs to become ("servants in order to be leaders"). I'm drawn to things like this because it's affirming, I guess, for me: "it really is true that we're absurd, that we're shallow, have bad habits, that we're bored, that we don't know how to look at things, that we can't understand; we're all like that." And of course he finds a way to make that into a good thing. which, it's pointed out by scholars, is very important to Dostoevsky philosophy-don't deny the earthly passions and problems in yourself, but accept them and incorporate them into your whole person. Me, I'm still working on that one.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
the-idiot-i-have-read-it-once-find-that-i-dont-remember-events-book-well-even-all-principal-characters-but-mostly-portrait-truly-beautiful-person-that-dostoevsky-supposedly-set-o
What are the dead, anyway, but waves and energy? Light shining from a dead star? That, by the way, is a phrase of Julian's. I remember it from a lecture of his on the Iliad, when Patroklos appears to Achilles in a dream. There is a very moving passage where Achilles overjoyed at the sight of the apparition - tries to throw his arms around the ghost of his old friend, and it vanishes. The dead appear to us in dreams, said Julian, because that's the only way they can make us see them; what we see is only a projection, beamed from a great distance, light shining at us from a dead star... Which reminds me, by the way, of a dream I had a couple of weeks ago. I found myself in a strange deserted city - an old city, like London - underpopulated by war or disease. It was night; the streets were dark, bombed-out, abandoned. For a long time, I wandered aimlessly - past ruined parks, blasted statuary, vacant lots overgrown with weeds and collapsed apartment houses with rusted girders poking out of their sides like ribs. But here and there, interspersed among the desolate shells of the heavy old public buildings, I began to see new buildings, too, which were connected by futuristic walkways lit from beneath. Long, cool perspectives of modern architecture, rising phosphorescent and eerie from the rubble. I went inside one of these new buildings. It was like a laboratory, maybe, or a museum. My footsteps echoed on the tile floors.There was a cluster of men, all smoking pipes, gathered around an exhibit in a glass case that gleamed in the dim light and lit their faces ghoulishly from below. I drew nearer. In the case was a machine revolving slowly on a turntable, a machine with metal parts that slid in and out and collapsed in upon themselves to form new images. An Inca temple... click click click... the Pyramids... the Parthenon. History passing beneath my very eyes, changing every moment. 'I thought I'd find you here, ' said a voice at my elbow. It was Henry. His gaze was steady and impassive in the dim light. Above his ear, beneath the wire stem of his spectacles, I could just make out the powder burn and the dark hole in his right temple. I was glad to see him, though not exactly surprised. 'You know, ' I said to him, 'everybody is saying that you're dead.' He stared down at the machine. The Colosseum... click click click... the Pantheon. 'I'm not dead, ' he said. 'I'm only having a bit of trouble with my passport.' 'What?' He cleared his throat. 'My movements are restricted, ' he said. 'I no longer have the ability to travel as freely as I would like.' Hagia Sophia. St. Mark's, in Venice. 'What is this place?' I asked him. 'That information is classified, I'm afraid.' 1 looked around curiously. It seemed that I was the only visitor. 'Is it open to the public?' I said. 'Not generally, no.' I looked at him. There was so much I wanted to ask him, so much I wanted to say; but somehow I knew there wasn't time and even if there was, that it was all, somehow, beside the point. 'Are you happy here?' I said at last. He considered this for a moment. 'Not particularly, ' he said. 'But you're not very happy where you are, either.' St. Basil's, in Moscow. Chartres. Salisbury and Amiens. He glanced at his watch. 'I hope you'll excuse me, ' he said, 'but I'm late for an appointment.' He turned from me and walked away. I watched his back receding down the long, gleaming hall.

Donna Tartt
what-are-dead-anyway-but-waves-energy-light-shining-from-dead-star-that-by-way-is-phrase-julians-i-remember-it-from-lecture-his-on-iliad-when-patroklos-appears-to-achilles-in-dre
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