Amenable Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
begin-by-seizing-something-which-your-opponent-holds-dear-then-he-will-be-amenable-to-your-will-sun-tzu
the-broad-masses-of-a-population-are-more-amenable-to-the-appeal-of-rhetoric-than-to-any-other-force
all-your-hopes-dreams-goals-aspirations-are-amenable-to-hard-work-brian-tracy
this-element-seat-appetites-desire-in-general-does-in-sense-participate-in-principle-as-being-amenable-obedient-to-it-aristotle
for-professors-in-academy-for-humanities-generally-misery-is-more-amenable-to-analysis-happiness-is-harder-nut-to-crack-ian-mcewan
fixed-mindset-is-not-amenable-to-change-growthdogmatic-opinionatedsolutionallow-god-godslet-this-mind-that-was-in-christ-ikechukwu-joseph
it-reflects-prevailing-myth-that-production-technology-is-no-more-amenable-to-human-judgment-social-interests-than-laws-thermodynamics-atomic-structure-biological-inheritance
verse-comedy-is-interesting-to-me-because-challenge-writing-in-rhymed-couplets-which-is-not-form-thats-usually-amenable-to-english-yet-to-me-it-david-ives
science-does-not-promise-absolute-truth-nor-does-it-consider-that-such-thing-necessarily-exists-science-does-not-even-promise-that-everything-in-isaac-asimov
saving-lives-is-more-important-than-preserving-quality-life-quality-life-is-always-amenable-to-improvement-death-is-permanent-benjamin-netanyahu
The object of this Essay is to assert one very simple principle, as entitled to govern absolutely the dealings of society with the individual in the way of compulsion and control, whether the means used be physical force in the form of legal penalties, or the moral coercion of public opinion. That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not a sufficient warrant. He cannot rightfully be compelled to do or forbear because it will be better for him to do so, because it will make him happier, because, in the opinions of others, to do so would be wise, or even right. These are good reasons for remonstrating with him, or reasoning with him, or persuading him, or entreating him, but not for compelling him, or visiting him with any evil, in case he do otherwise. To justify that, the conduct from which it is desired to deter him must be calculated to produce evil to someone else. The only part of the conduct of any one, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. In the part which merely concerns himself, his independence is, of right, absolute. Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.

John Stuart Mill
the-object-this-essay-is-to-assert-one-simple-principle-as-entitled-to-govern-absolutely-dealings-society-with-individual-in-way-compulsion-control-whether-means-used-be-physical
Among the papyri interpreted as fragments of books once used by teachers and students, the Psalter is better represented than any other volume of Jewish or Christian canonical Scripture, strongly suggesting that the Davidic Psalter was more used and read 'than any book of the Old Testament, perhaps more than any book of the Bible, throughout the Christian centuries in Egypt'. A recent inventory of papyrus notebooks lists eleven items for the period between the third century and the seventh inclusive, of which eight give primarily or exclusively the texts of the psalms. Narrowing the period of the third century to the fifth gives seven papyrus items of which five contain copies of psalms. These notebooks are the best guide to what the literate slaves of larger households, grammar masters and attentive parents were teaching their infants in Egypt, both Jewish and Christian, and they suggest that the psalms were a fundamental teaching text in the social circles where men and women used writing, or aspired to it for their children. That is hardly surprising, since the psalms were ideal for teaching the young in households wealthy enough to afford the luxury of an education for an offspring. An almanac of prayer and counsel for times of good and adverse fortune, the poems of the Psalter are arranged in sense-units of moderate length by virtue of the poetic form. This makes them amenable to study, including the slow process of acquiring the skills of penmanship (Pl. 29).

Christopher Page
among-papyri-interpreted-as-fragments-books-once-used-by-teachers-students-psalter-is-better-represented-than-any-other-volume-jewish-christian-canonical-scripture-strongly-sugge
Civilized people must, I believe, satisfy the following criteria: 1) They respect human beings as individuals and are therefore always tolerant, gentle, courteous and amenable... They do not create scenes over a hammer or a mislaid eraser; they do not make you feel they are conferring a great benefit on you when they live with you, and they don't make a scandal when they leave. (...) 2) They have compassion for other people besides beggars and cats. Their hearts suffer the pain of what is hidden to the naked eye. (...) 3) They respect other people's property, and therefore pay their debts. 4) They are not devious, and they fear lies as they fear fire. They don't tell lies even in the most trivial matters. To lie to someone is to insult them, and the liar is diminished in the eyes of the person he lies to. Civilized people don't put on airs; they behave in the street as they would at home, they don't show off to impress their juniors. (...) 5) They don't run themselves down in order to provoke the sympathy of others. They don't play on other people's heartstrings to be sighed over and cosseted... that sort of thing is just cheap striving for effects, it's vulgar, old hat and false. (...) 6) They are not vain. They don't waste time with the fake jewellery of hobnobbing with celebrities, being permitted to shake the hand of a drunken [judicial orator], the exaggerated bonhomie of the first person they meet at the Salon, being the life and soul of the bar... They regard prases like 'I am a representative of the Press!!' - the sort of thing one only hears from [very minor journalists] - as absurd. If they have done a brass farthing's work they don't pass it off as if it were 100 roubles' by swanking about with their portfolios, and they don't boast of being able to gain admission to places other people aren't allowed in (...) True talent always sits in the shade, mingles with the crowd, avoids the limelight... As Krylov said, the empty barrel makes more noise than the full one. (...) 7) If they do possess talent, they value it... They take pride in it... they know they have a responsibility to exert a civilizing influence on [others] rather than aimlessly hanging out with them. And they are fastidious in their habits. (...) 8) They work at developing their aesthetic sensibility... Civilized people don't simply obey their baser instincts... they require mens sana in corpore sano. And so on. That's what civilized people are like... Reading Pickwick and learning a speech from Faust by heart is not enough if your aim is to become a truly civilized person and not to sink below the level of your surroundings. [From a letter to Nikolay Chekhov, March 1886]

Anton Chekhov
civilized-people-must-i-believe-satisfy-following-criteria-1-they-respect-human-beings-as-individuals-are-therefore-always-tolerant-gentle-courteous-amenable-they-do-not-create-s
?Earn cash when you save a quote by clicking
EARNED Load...
LEVEL : Load...