Assiduously Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
i-read-assiduously-i-kept-in-touch-with-my-species-leonard-michaels
some-people-have-perfect-genius-for-doing-nothing-doing-it-assiduously-thomas-chandler-haliburton
most-painters-have-painted-themselves-so-have-most-poets-not-palpably-indeed-but-more-assiduously-some-have-done-nothing-else-augustus-william-hare
one-should-assiduously-pursue-perfection-without-ever-claiming-to-attain-it-nicolas-malebranche
remain-assiduously-stubborn-with-your-positive-thinking-sooner-later-world-around-you-will-give-up-let-you-have-your-way-carl-henegan
sometimes-he-advertises-himself-assiduously-writing-a-few-words-and-then-rushing-to-the-talk-show-to-wave-his-flag
he-who-neglects-to-pray-alone-in-private-however-assiduously-he-frequents-public-meetings-there-gives-his-prayers-to-wind-jean-calvin
shedding-carapace-we-have-been-building-assiduously-on-surface-we-must-by-definition-give-up-exactly-what-we-thought-was-necessary-to-protect-us-david-whyte
sometimes-hardest-part-my-job-is-incessant-reminder-fact-were-all-trying-assiduously-to-ignore-we-are-here-temporarily-life-is-only-ours-on-sue-grafton
most-politicians-keep-close-tabs-on-whats-happening-back-home-work-assiduously-to-keep-lines-communications-open-with-political-players-in-their-states-districts
reiko-had-not-kept-diary-was-now-denied-pleasure-assiduously-rereading-her-record-happiness-past-few-months-consigning-each-page-to-fire-as-she-did-death-in-midsummer-other-stori
why-do-right-wing-media-assiduously-scrutinize-words-grief-filled-mother-ignore-words-lying-president-cindy-sheehan
i-had-chance-to-witness-evolution-nuclear-deal-into-dr-singhs-legacy-as-he-assiduously-piece-by-piece-crafted-indo-us-nuclear-deal-against-all-odds-including-risking-his-governme
there-is-nothing-more-difficult-than-understanding-human-mentality-my-masters-present-mental-state-is-far-from-clear-is-he-feeling-angry-lighthearted-simply-seeking-solace-in-scr
Is power like the vis viva and the quantite d'avancement? That is, is it conserved by the universe, or is it like shares of a stock, which may have great value one day, and be worthless the next? If power is like stock shares, then it follows that the immense sum thereof lately lost by B[olingbroke] has vanished like shadows in sunlight. For no matter how much wealth is lost in stock crashes, it never seems to turn up, but if power is conserved, then B's must have gone somewhere. Where is it? Some say 'twas scooped up by my Lord R, who hid it under a rock, lest my Lord M come from across the sea and snatch it away. My friends among the Whigs say that any power lost by a Tory is infallibly and insensibly distributed among all the people, but no matter how assiduously I search the lower rooms of the clink for B's lost power, I cannot seem to find any there, which explodes that argument, for there are assuredly very many people in those dark salons. I propose a novel theory of power, which is inspired by... the engine for raising water by fire. As a mill makes flour, a loom makes cloth and a forge makes steel, so we are assured this engine shall make power. If the backers of this device speak truly, and I have no reason to deprecate their honesty, it proves that power is not a conserved quantity, for of such quantities, it is never possible to make more. The amount of power in the world, it follows, is ever increasing, and the rate of increase grows ever faster as more of these engines are built. A man who hordes power is therefore like a miser who sits on a heap of coins in a realm where the currency is being continually debased by the production of more coins than the market can bear. So that what was a great fortune, when first he raked it together, insensibly becomes a slag heap, and is found to be devoid of value. When at last he takes it to the marketplace to be spent. Thus my Lord B and his vaunted power hoard what is true of him is likely to be true of his lackeys, particularly his most base and slavish followers such as Mr. Charles White. This varmint has asserted that he owns me. He fancies that to own a man is to have power, yet he has got nothing by claiming to own me, while I who was supposed to be rendered powerless, am now writing for a Grub Street newspaper that is being perused by you, esteemed reader.

Neal Stephenson
is-power-like-vis-viva-quantite-davancement-that-is-is-it-conserved-by-universe-is-it-like-shares-stock-which-may-have-great-value-one-day-be-worthless-next-if-power-is-like-stoc
We are all poor; but there is a difference between what Mrs. Spark intends by speaking of 'slender means', and what Stevens called our poverty or Sartre our need, besoin. The poet finds his brief, fortuitous concords, it is true: not merely 'what will suffice, ' but 'the freshness of transformation, ' the 'reality of decreation, ' the 'gaiety of language.' The novelist accepts need, the difficulty of relating one's fictions to what one knows about the nature of reality, as his donnee. It is because no one has said more about this situation, or given such an idea of its complexity, that I want to devote most of this talk to Sartre and the most relevant of his novels, La Nausee. As things go now it isn't of course very modern; Robbe-Grillet treats it with amused reverence as a valuable antique. But it will still serve for my purposes. This book is doubtless very well known to you; I can't undertake to tell you much about it, especially as it has often been regarded as standing in an unusually close relation to a body of philosophy which I am incompetent to expound. Perhaps you will be charitable if I explain that I shall be using it and other works of Sartre merely as examples. What I have to do is simply to show that La Nausee represents, in the work of one extremely important and representative figure, a kind of crisis in the relation between fiction and reality, the tension or dissonance between paradigmatic form and contingent reality. That the mood of Sartre has sometimes been appropriate to the modern demythologized apocalypse is something I shall take for granted; his is a philosophy of crisis, but his world has no beginning and no end. The absurd dishonesty of all prefabricated patterns is cardinal to his beliefs; to cover reality over with eidetic images-illusions persisting from past acts of perception, as some abnormal children 'see' the page or object that is no longer before them -to do this is to sink into mauvaise foi. This expression covers all comfortable denials of the undeniable-freedom -by myths of necessity, nature, or things as they are. Are all the paradigms of fiction eidetic? Is the unavoidable, insidious, comfortable enemy of all novelists mauvaise foi? Sartre has recently, in his first instalment of autobiography, talked with extraordinary vivacity about the roleplaying of his youth, of the falsities imposed upon him by the fictive power of words. At the beginning of the Great War he began a novel about a French private who captured the Kaiser, defeated him in single combat, and so ended the war and recovered Alsace. But everything went wrong. The Kaiser, hissed by the poilus, no match for the superbly fit Private Perrin, spat upon and insulted, became 'somehow heroic.' Worse still, the peace, which should instantly have followed in the real world if this fiction had a genuine correspondence with reality, failed to occur. 'I very nearly renounced literature, ' says Sartre. Roquentin, in a subtler but basically similar situation, has the same reaction. Later Sartre would find again that the hero, however assiduously you use the pitchfork, will recur, and that gaps, less gross perhaps, between fiction and reality will open in the most close-knit pattern of words. Again, the young Sartre would sometimes, when most identified with his friends at the lycee, feel himself to be 'freed at last from the sin of existing'-this is also an expression of Roquentin's, but Roquentin says it feels like being a character in a novel. How can novels, by telling lies, convert existence into being? We see Roquentin waver between the horror of contingency and the fiction of aventures. In Les Mots Sartre very engagingly tells us that he was Roquentin, certainly, but that he was Sartre also, 'the elect, the chronicler of hells' to whom the whole novel of which he now speaks so derisively was a sort of aventure, though what was represented within it was 'the unjustified, brackish existence of my fellow-creatures.

Frank Kermode
we-are-all-poor-but-there-is-difference-between-what-mrs-spark-intends-by-speaking-slender-means-what-stevens-called-our-poverty-sartre-our-need-besoin-the-poet-finds-his-brief-f
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