Byron Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
what-man-sees-in-human-race-is-merely-himself-in-deep-honest-privacy-his-own-heart-byron-despised-race-because-he-despised-himself-i-feel-as-mark-twain
im-john-clare-now-i-was-byron-shakespeare-formerly
anything-for-byrons-least-favorite-apprentice-its-least-i-can-do-since-you-took-over-my-torch-rachel-e-carter
sometimes-i-can-think-nothing-more-blissful-than-going-to-berkeley-reading-byron-for-three-years
i-never-learn-anything-from-listening-to-myself-ovid-byron-in-flight-behavior-barbara-kingsolver
byron-is-one-tough-guy-he-can-play-through-just-about-anything-i-know-he-will-be-ready-to-go-on-sunday-chad-pennington
a-few-more-years-will-destroy-whatever-yet-remains-that-magical-potency-which-once-belonged-to-name-byron-thomas-b-macaulay
steve-wheeler-is-byron-stroud-is-jed-simon-is-well-im-e-val-i-know-im-zimmers-hole
to-believe-in-god-is-not-hard-inquisitors-byron-arakcheev-believed-in-him-no-believe-in-man-anton-chekhov
ive-been-making-best-movies-at-elegant-angel-since-tom-byron-left
i-have-to-say-that-it-was-strange-experience-when-later-in-life-i-represented-byron-scott-was-negotiating-with-west-whose-picture-i-used-to-have-over-my-bed-that-took-some-gettin
in-future-new-generation-artists-will-be-writing-genomes-as-fluently-as-blake-byron-wrote-verses-freeman-dyson
i-hate-whole-race-there-is-no-believing-word-they-say-your-professional-poets-i-mean-there-never-existed-more-worthless-set-than-byron-his-friends-duke-wellington
id-love-to-own-newstead-partly-because-it-belonged-to-lord-byron-but-also-to-try-to-uncover-what-dark-secrets-really-lie-beneath
byron-owed-vast-influence-which-he-exercised-over-his-contemporaries-at-least-as-much-to-his-gloomy-egotism-as-to-real-power-his-poetry-thomas-b-macaulay
if-they-had-said-that-sun-moon-had-gone-out-heavens-it-could-not-have-struck-me-with-idea-more-awful-dreary-blank-in-creation-than-words-jane-welsh-carlyle
you-speak-lord-byron-me-there-is-this-great-difference-between-us-he-describes-what-he-sees-i-describe-what-i-imagine-mine-is-hardest-task-john-keats
forgive-me-also-that-i-didnt-fight-like-lord-byron-for-happiness-captive-peoples-that-i-watched-only-risings-moon-museums-zbigniew-herbert
romantic-poetry-had-its-heyday-when-people-like-lord-byron-were-kicking-it-large-but-you-try-make-living-as-poet-today-youll-find-its-different-alan-moore
golf-took-young-kids-like-byron-nelson-ben-hogan-myself-out-caddie-ranks-gave-us-money-little-bit-fame-let-us-live-in-tall-cotton-jimmy-demaret
i-began-my-legal-career-working-for-byron-white-last-coloradan-to-serve-on-supreme-court-only-justice-to-lead-nfl-in-rushing-he-was-one-smartest-most-courageous-men-ive-ever-know
i-learned-that-you-should-feel-when-writing-not-like-lord-byron-on-mountain-top-but-like-child-stringing-beads-in-kindergarten-happy-absorbed-brenda-ueland
america-remained-land-promise-for-lovers-freedom-even-byron-at-moment-when-he-was-disgusted-with-napoleon-for-not-committing-suicide-wrote-bertrand-russell
when-we-two-parted-in-silence-tears-half-brokenhearted-to-sever-for-years-when-we-two-partedgeorge-gordon-lord-byron-karla-m-nashar
bardot-byron-hitler-hemingway-monroe-sade-we-do-not-require-our-heroes-to-be-subtle-just-to-be-big-then-we-can-depend-on-someone-to-make-them-subtle-d-j-enright
well-done-darren-master-byron-was-full-praise-for-prince-what-did-you-use-to-cast-it-darrens-eyes-found-mine-something-i-dont-regret-rachel-e-carter
all-human-history-attests-that-happiness-for-man-hungry-sinner-since-eve-ate-apples-much-depends-on-dinner-lord-byron-don-juan-canto-xiii-stanza-99-lord-byron
he-was-your-usual-man-when-it-came-to-romance-which-is-to-say-he-couldnt-recite-baa-baa-black-sheep-when-sober-whereas-when-drunk-sixteen-cantos-byrons-don-juan-was-par-for-cours
Very Like a Whale One thing that literature would be greatly the better for Would be a more restricted employment by authors of simile and metaphor. Authors of all races, be they Greeks, Romans, Teutons or Celts, Can'ts seem just to say that anything is the thing it is but have to go out of their way to say that it is like something else. What foes it mean when we are told That the Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold? In the first place, George Gordon Byron had had enough experience To know that it probably wasn't just one Assyrian, it was a lot of Assyrians. However, as too many arguments are apt to induce apoplexy and thus hinder longevity, We'll let it pass as one Assyrian for the sake of brevity. Now then, this particular Assyrian, the one whose cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold, Just what does the poet mean when he says he came down like a wolf on the fold? In heaven and earth more than is dreamed of in our philosophy there are a great many things, But i don't imagine that among then there is a wolf with purple and gold cohorts or purple and gold anythings. No, no, Lord Byron, before I'll believe that this Assyrian was actually like a wolf I must have some kind of proof; Did he run on all fours and did he have a hairy tail and a big red mouth and big white teeth and did he say Woof woof? Frankly I think it very unlikely, and all you were entitled to say, at the very most, Was that the Assyrian cohorts came down like a lot of Assyrian cohorts about to destroy the Hebrew host. But that wasn't fancy enough for Lord Byron, oh dear me no, he had to invent a lot of figures of speech and then interpolate them, With the result that whenever you mention Old Testament soldiers to people they say Oh yes, they're the ones that a lot of wolves dressed up in gold and purple ate them. That's the kind of thing that's being done all the time by poets, from Homer to Tennyson; They're always comparing ladies to lilies and veal to venison, And they always say things like that the snow is a white blanket after a winter storm. Oh it is, is it, all right then, you sleep under a six-inch blanket of snow and I'll sleep under a half-inch blanket of unpoetical blanket material and we'll see which one keeps warm, And after that maybe you'll begin to comprehend dimly, What I mean by too much metaphor and simile.

Ogden Nash
very-like-whale-one-thing-that-literature-would-be-greatly-better-for-would-be-more-restricted-employment-by-authors-simile-metaphor-authors-all-races-be-they-greeks-romans-teuto
tom-byron-is-my-friend-jj-michaels-is-my-friend-i-havent-heard-from-him-i-dont-know-what-he-believes-a-couple-other-have-called-but-i-havent-called-them-back
The Romantic journey was usually a solitary one. Although the Romantic poets were closely connected with one another, and some collaborated in their work, they each had a strong individual vision. Romantic poets could not continue their quests for long or sustain their vision into later life. The power of the imagination and of inspiration did not last. Whereas earlier poets had patrons who financed their writing, the tradition of patronage was not extensive in the Romantic period and poets often lacked financial and other support. Keats, Shelley and Byron all died in solitary exile from England at a young age, their work left incomplete, non-conformists to the end. This coincides with the characteristic Romantic images of the solitary heroic individual, the spiritual outcast 'alone, alone, all, all alone' like Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and John Clare's 'I'; like Shelley's Alastor, Keats's Endymion, or Byron's Manfred, who reached beyond the normal social codes and normal human limits so that 'his aspirations/Have been beyond the dwellers of the earth'. Wordsworth, who lived to be an old man, wrote poems throughout his life in which his poetic vision is stimulated by a single figure or object set against a natural background. Even his projected final masterpiece was entitled The Recluse. The solitary journey of the Romantic poet was taken up by many Victorian and twentieth-century poets, becoming almost an emblem of the individual's search for identity in an ever more confused and confusing world.

Ronald Carter
the-romantic-journey-was-usually-solitary-one-although-romantic-poets-were-closely-connected-with-one-another-some-collaborated-in-their-work-they-each-had-strong-individual-visi
In terms of literary history, the publication of Lyrical Ballads in 1798 is seen as a landmark. The volume contains many of the best-known Romantic poems. The second edition in 1800 contained a Preface in which Wordsworth discusses the theories of poetry which were to be so influential on many of his and Coleridge's contemporaries. The Preface represents a poetic manifesto which is very much in the spirit of the age. The movement towards greater freedom and democracy in political and social affairs is paralleled by poetry which sought to overturn the existing regime and establish a new, more 'democratic' poetic order. To do this, the writers used 'the real language of men' (Preface to Lyrical Ballads) and even, in the case of Byron and Shelley, got directly involved in political activities themselves. The Romantic age in literature is often contrasted with the Classical or Augustan age which preceded it. The comparison is valuable, for it is not simply two different attitudes to literature which are being compared but two different ways of seeing and experiencing life. The Classical or Augustan age of the early and mid-eighteenth century stressed the importance of reason and order. Strong feelings and flights of the imagination had to be controlled (although they were obviously found widely, especially in poetry). The swift improvements in medicine, economics, science and engineering, together with rapid developments in both agricultural and industrial technology, suggested human progress on a grand scale. At the centre of these advances towards a perfect society was mankind, and it must have seemed that everything was within man's grasp if his baser, bestial instincts could be controlled. The Classical temperament trusts reason, intellect, and the head. The Romantic temperament prefers feelings, intuition, and the heart.

Ronald Carter
in-terms-literary-history-publication-lyrical-ballads-in-1798-is-seen-as-landmark-the-volume-contains-many-bestknown-romantic-poems-the-second-edition-in-1800-contained-preface-i
76. David Hume - Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile - or, On Education, The Social Contract 78. Laurence Sterne - Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy 79. Adam Smith - The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations 80. Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace 81. Edward Gibbon - The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography 82. James Boswell - Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier - Traite e‰lementaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry) 84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison - Federalist Papers 85. Jeremy Bentham - Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions 86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - Faust; Poetry and Truth 87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier - Analytical Theory of Heat 88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History 89. William Wordsworth - Poems 90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Poems; Biographia Literaria 91. Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice; Emma 92. Carl von Clausewitz - On War 93. Stendhal - The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love 94. Lord Byron - Don Juan 95. Arthur Schopenhauer - Studies in Pessimism 96. Michael Faraday - Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity 97. Charles Lyell - Principles of Geology 98. Auguste Comte - The Positive Philosophy 99. Honore de Balzac - Pe¨re Goriot; Eugenie Grandet 100. Ralph Waldo Emerson - Representative Men; Essays; Journal 101. Nathaniel Hawthorne - The Scarlet Letter 102. Alexis de Tocqueville - Democracy in America 103. John Stuart Mill - A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography 104. Charles Darwin - The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography 105. Charles Dickens - Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times 106. Claude Bernard - Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine 107. Henry David Thoreau - Civil Disobedience; Walden 108. Karl Marx - Capital; Communist Manifesto 109. George Eliot - Adam Bede; Middlemarch 110. Herman Melville - Moby-Dick; Billy Budd 111. Fyodor Dostoevsky - Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov 112. Gustave Flaubert - Madame Bovary; Three Stories 113. Henrik Ibsen - Plays 114. Leo Tolstoy - War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales 115. Mark Twain - The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger 116. William James - The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism 117. Henry James - The American; The Ambassadors 118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche - Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power 119. Jules Henri Poincare - Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method 120. Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis 121. George Bernard Shaw - Plays and Prefaces

Mortimer J. Adler
76david-hume-treatise-on-human-nature-essays-moral-political-an-enquiry-concerning-human-understanding-77jeanjacques-rousseau-on-origin-inequality-on-political-economy-emile-on-e
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