Contingency Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
and-even-if-circumstances-required-contingency-plan-for-his-contingency-plans-contingency-plan-frank-beddor
he-is-always-becoming-if-it-were-not-for-contingency-death-he-would-never-end-jeanpaul-sartre
it-seems-to-me-that-everything-that-happens-to-us-is-disconcerting-mix-choice-contingency
did-you-consider-anything-like-infected-simon-had-asked-not-quite-but-some-our-other-contingency-plans-might-help-us-out-with-this-particular-mission-l-ashley-straker
there-is-nearly-always-uh-process-wanting-contingency-plans-made-in-military-mcgeorge-bundy
the-world-changed-from-having-determinism-clock-to-having-contingency-pinball-machine-heinz-pagels
chance-doesnt-mean-meaningless-randomness-but-historical-contingency-this-happens-rather-than-that-thats-way-that-novelty-new-things-come-about-john-polkinghorne
seriously-this-old-woman-had-no-idea-how-close-she-came-to-being-squashed-like-roach-sage-hannigan-contingency-ps-martinez
take-charge-your-own-y2k-life-once-you-do-your-own-checking-analyze-create-your-own-contingency-plan-robert-bennett
when-you-see-john-boehner-crying-believe-you-me-its-because-he-cannot-control-uh-that-wild-contingency-called-tea-party
humans-are-wired-to-feel-uncomfortable-with-uncertainty-contingency-we-gravitate-to-position-after-short-time-even-if-we-have-no-new-information-charles-hugh-smith
you-will-understand-game-behind-curtain-too-well-not-to-perceive-old-trick-turning-every-contingency-into-resource-for-accumulating-force-in-james-madison
mercy-is-contingency-plan-devised-by-guilty-in-eventuality-that-they-are-caught-justice-is-domain-just-richard-rahl-terry-goodkind
you-can-get-far-in-north-america-with-laconic-grunts-huh-hun-hi-in-their-various-modulations-together-with-sure-guess-that-nuts-will-meet-almost-ian-fleming
presidents-lyndon-johnson-was-really-no-exception-rapidly-learned-difference-between-contingency-plan-authorized-act-mcgeorge-bundy
look-in-at-drones-ask-first-fellow-you-meet-can-fine-spirit-woosters-be-crushed-he-will-offer-you-attractive-odds-against-such-contingency-pg-wodehouse
there-is-certainly-strong-game-development-community-in-texas-centered-around-austin-with-significant-additional-contingency-coming-over-from-dallas
sometimes-life-can-be-unexpected-sometimes-things-surprise-you-all-you-can-do-is-roll-with-punches-let-them-beat-you-to-bloody-pulp-sage-hannigan-contingency-ps-martinez
poetry-is-act-distillation-it-takes-contingency-samples-is-selective-it-telescopes-time-it-focuses-what-most-often-floods-past-us-in-polite-blur-diane-ackerman
a-wise-man-when-he-writes-book-sets-forth-his-arguments-fully-clearly-enlightened-ruler-when-he-makes-his-laws-sees-to-it-that-every-contingency-is-provided-for-in-detail
there-are-contingency-plans-in-nato-doctrine-to-fire-nuclear-weapon-for-demonstrative-purposes-to-demonstrate-to-other-side-that-they-are-exceeding-alexander-haig
luck-enters-into-every-contingency-you-are-fool-if-you-forget-it-greater-fool-if-you-count-upon-it-phyllis-bottome
I hope I have now made it clear why I thought it best, in speaking of the dissonances between fiction and reality in our own time, to concentrate on Sartre. His hesitations, retractations, inconsistencies, all proceed from his consciousness of the problems: how do novelistic differ from existential fictions? How far is it inevitable that a novel give a novel-shaped account of the world? How can one control, and how make profitable, the dissonances between that account and the account given by the mind working independently of the novel? For Sartre it was ultimately, like most or all problems, one of freedom. For Miss Murdoch it is a problem of love, the power by which we apprehend the opacity of persons to the degree that we will not limit them by forcing them into selfish patterns. Both of them are talking, when they speak of freedom and love, about the imagination. The imagination, we recall, is a form-giving power, an esemplastic power; it may require, to use Simone Weil's words, to be preceded by a 'decreative' act, but it is certainly a maker of orders and concords. We apply it to all forces which satisfy the variety of human needs that are met by apparently gratuitous forms. These forms console; if they mitigate our existential anguish it is because we weakly collaborate with them, as we collaborate with language in order to communicate. Whether or no we are predisposed towards acceptance of them, we learn them as we learn a language. On one view they are 'the heroic children whom time breeds / Against the first idea, ' but on another they destroy by falsehood the heroic anguish of our present loneliness. If they appear in shapes preposterously false we will reject them; but they change with us, and every act of reading or writing a novel is a tacit acceptance of them. If they ruin our innocence, we have to remember that the innocent eye sees nothing. If they make us guilty, they enable us, in a manner nothing else can duplicate, to submit, as we must, the show of things to the desires of the mind. I shall end by saying a little more about La Nausee, the book I chose because, although it is a novel, it reflects a philosophy it must, in so far as it possesses novel form, belie. Under one aspect it is what Philip Thody calls 'an extensive illustration' of the world's contingency and the absurdity of the human situation. Mr. Thody adds that it is the novelist's task to 'overcome contingency'; so that if the illustration were too extensive the novel would be a bad one. Sartre himself provides a more inclusive formula when he says that 'the final aim of art is to reclaim the world by revealing it as it is, but as if it had its source in human liberty.' This statement does two things. First, it links the fictions of art with those of living and choosing. Secondly, it means that the humanizing of the world's contingency cannot be achieved without a representation of that contingency. This representation must be such that it induces the proper sense of horror at the utter difference, the utter shapelessness, and the utter inhumanity of what must be humanized. And it has to occur simultaneously with the as if, the act of form, of humanization, which assuages the horror. This recognition, that form must not regress into myth, and that contingency must be formalized, makes La Nausee something of a model of the conflicts in the modern theory of the novel. How to do justice to a chaotic, viscously contingent reality, and yet redeem it? How to justify the fictive beginnings, crises, ends; the atavism of character, which we cannot prevent from growing, in Yeats's figure, like ash on a burning stick? The novel will end; a full close may be avoided, but there will be a close: a fake fullstop, an 'exhaustion of aspects, ' as Ford calls it, an ironic return to the origin, as in Finnegans Wake and Comment c'est. Perhaps the book will end by saying that it has provided the clues for another, in which contingency will be defeated, ...

Frank Kermode
i-hope-i-have-now-made-it-clear-why-i-thought-it-best-in-speaking-dissonances-between-fiction-reality-in-our-own-time-to-concentrate-on-sartre-his-hesitations-retractations-incon
Remaining for a moment with the question of legality and illegality: United Nations Security Council Resolution 1368, unanimously passed, explicitly recognized the right of the United States to self-defense and further called upon all member states 'to bring to justice the perpetrators, organizers and sponsors of the terrorist attacks. It added that 'those responsible for aiding, supporting or harboring the perpetrators, organizers and sponsors of those acts will be held accountable.' In a speech the following month, the United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan publicly acknowledged the right of self-defense as a legitimate basis for military action. The SEAL unit dispatched by President Obama to Abbottabad was large enough to allow for the contingency of bin-Laden's capture and detention. The naive statement that he was 'unarmed' when shot is only loosely compatible with the fact that he was housed in a military garrison town, had a loaded automatic weapon in the room with him, could well have been wearing a suicide vest, had stated repeatedly that he would never be taken alive, was the commander of one of the most violent organizations in history, and had declared himself at war with the United States. It perhaps says something that not even the most casuistic apologist for al-Qaeda has ever even attempted to justify any of its 'operations' in terms that could be covered by any known law, with the possible exception of some sanguinary verses of the Koran.

Christopher Hitchens
remaining-for-moment-with-question-legality-illegality-united-nations-security-council-resolution-1368-unanimously-passed-explicitly-recognized-right-united-states-to-selfdefense
sure-zombies-can-be-metaphor-they-can-represent-oppressed-as-in-land-dead-humanitys-feral-nature-as-in-28-days-or-racial-politics-fear-contagion-even-consumer-unconscious-night-l
There can be no doubt that the chief fault we have developed, through the long course of human evolution, is a certain basic passivity. When provoked by challenges, human beings are magnificent. When life is quiet and even, we take the path of least resistance, and then wonder why we feel bored. A man who is determined and active doesn't pay much attention to 'luck'. If things go badly, he takes a deep breath and redoubles his effort. And he quickly discovers that his moments of deepest happiness often come after such efforts. The man who has become accustomed to a passive existence becomes preoccupied with 'luck'; it may become an obsession. When things go well, he is delighted and good humored; when they go badly, he becomes gloomy and petulant. He is unhappy-or dissatisfied-most of the time, for even when he has no cause for complaint, he feels that gratitude would be premature; things might go wrong at any moment; you can't really trust the world... Gambling is one basic response to this passivity, revealing the obsession with luck, the desire to make things happen. The absurdity about this attitude is that we fail to recognize the active part we play in making life a pleasure. When my will is active, my whole mental and physical being works better, just as my digestion works better if I take exercise between meals. I gain an increasing feeling of control over my life, instead of the feeling of helplessness (what Sartre calls 'contingency') that comes from long periods of passivity. Yet even people who are intelligent enough to recognize this find the habit of passivity so deeply ingrained that they find themselves holding their breath when things go well, hoping fate will continue to be kind.

Colin Wilson
there-can-be-no-doubt-that-chief-fault-we-have-developed-through-long-course-human-evolution-is-certain-basic-passivity-when-provoked-by-challenges-human-beings-are-magnificent-w
We are all poor; but there is a difference between what Mrs. Spark intends by speaking of 'slender means', and what Stevens called our poverty or Sartre our need, besoin. The poet finds his brief, fortuitous concords, it is true: not merely 'what will suffice, ' but 'the freshness of transformation, ' the 'reality of decreation, ' the 'gaiety of language.' The novelist accepts need, the difficulty of relating one's fictions to what one knows about the nature of reality, as his donnee. It is because no one has said more about this situation, or given such an idea of its complexity, that I want to devote most of this talk to Sartre and the most relevant of his novels, La Nausee. As things go now it isn't of course very modern; Robbe-Grillet treats it with amused reverence as a valuable antique. But it will still serve for my purposes. This book is doubtless very well known to you; I can't undertake to tell you much about it, especially as it has often been regarded as standing in an unusually close relation to a body of philosophy which I am incompetent to expound. Perhaps you will be charitable if I explain that I shall be using it and other works of Sartre merely as examples. What I have to do is simply to show that La Nausee represents, in the work of one extremely important and representative figure, a kind of crisis in the relation between fiction and reality, the tension or dissonance between paradigmatic form and contingent reality. That the mood of Sartre has sometimes been appropriate to the modern demythologized apocalypse is something I shall take for granted; his is a philosophy of crisis, but his world has no beginning and no end. The absurd dishonesty of all prefabricated patterns is cardinal to his beliefs; to cover reality over with eidetic images-illusions persisting from past acts of perception, as some abnormal children 'see' the page or object that is no longer before them -to do this is to sink into mauvaise foi. This expression covers all comfortable denials of the undeniable-freedom -by myths of necessity, nature, or things as they are. Are all the paradigms of fiction eidetic? Is the unavoidable, insidious, comfortable enemy of all novelists mauvaise foi? Sartre has recently, in his first instalment of autobiography, talked with extraordinary vivacity about the roleplaying of his youth, of the falsities imposed upon him by the fictive power of words. At the beginning of the Great War he began a novel about a French private who captured the Kaiser, defeated him in single combat, and so ended the war and recovered Alsace. But everything went wrong. The Kaiser, hissed by the poilus, no match for the superbly fit Private Perrin, spat upon and insulted, became 'somehow heroic.' Worse still, the peace, which should instantly have followed in the real world if this fiction had a genuine correspondence with reality, failed to occur. 'I very nearly renounced literature, ' says Sartre. Roquentin, in a subtler but basically similar situation, has the same reaction. Later Sartre would find again that the hero, however assiduously you use the pitchfork, will recur, and that gaps, less gross perhaps, between fiction and reality will open in the most close-knit pattern of words. Again, the young Sartre would sometimes, when most identified with his friends at the lycee, feel himself to be 'freed at last from the sin of existing'-this is also an expression of Roquentin's, but Roquentin says it feels like being a character in a novel. How can novels, by telling lies, convert existence into being? We see Roquentin waver between the horror of contingency and the fiction of aventures. In Les Mots Sartre very engagingly tells us that he was Roquentin, certainly, but that he was Sartre also, 'the elect, the chronicler of hells' to whom the whole novel of which he now speaks so derisively was a sort of aventure, though what was represented within it was 'the unjustified, brackish existence of my fellow-creatures.

Frank Kermode
we-are-all-poor-but-there-is-difference-between-what-mrs-spark-intends-by-speaking-slender-means-what-stevens-called-our-poverty-sartre-our-need-besoin-the-poet-finds-his-brief-f
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