Contrasts Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
life-is-full-contrasts
contrasts-help-us-to-recognize-value-in-things-we-love-enjoy-without-appreciation-are-we-who-do-not-have-opposites-elizabeth-alraune
painting-stems-from-sense-organisation-sensed-positions-contrasts-not-that-it-is-about-this-roy-lichtenstein
egypt-is-great-place-for-contrasts-splendid-things-gleam-in-dust-gustave-flaubert
i-like-really-sharp-flavors-i-like-contrasts-something-sweet-sour-at-same-time-is-big-win
im-interested-in-creating-space-through-color-contrasts-rather-than-by-simple-shadows-light-dark-august-macke
you-have-to-be-aware-all-latent-possibilities-that-give-work-its-special-character-its-atmosphere-its-moods-its-contrasts-alfred-brendel
happiness-is-like-time-spacewe-make-measure-it-ourselves-it-is-as-fancy-as-big-as-little-as-you-please-just-thing-contrasts-comparisons-george-du-maurier
an-anguish-longing-would-boil-up-inside-me-hysterical-thirst-for-contradictions-contrasts-would-appear-i-would-embark-on-dissipations-fyodor-dostoevsky
anger-is-just-not-who-i-am-i-dont-think-its-what-voters-in-6th-district-want-they-want-respectful-decent-representation-that-contrasts-starkly-with-what-we-have-in-washington
we-do-not-live-an-equal-life-but-one-of-contrasts-and-patchwork-now-a-little-joy-then-a-sorrow-now-a-sin-then-a-generous-or-brave-action
i-find-edinburgh-stimulating-place-in-which-to-live-with-it-being-city-contrasts-both-architecturally-socially-each-district-having-definite-character
an-artist-finds-his-happiest-combination-in-play-complementary-colors-they-are-direct-contrasts-yet-do-not-jar-they-awaken-beholder-but-do-not-charles-e-burchfield
imagination-that-compares-contrasts-with-what-is-around-as-well-as-what-is-better-worse-is-living-power-prime-agent-all-human-perception-samuel-taylor-coleridge
from-dawn-to-dusk-winter-to-spring-summer-autumn-contrasts-nature-refresh-mind-renew-our-sense-balance-phil-harding
the-christian-principles-on-which-country-was-primarily-founded-are-rarely-consulted-other-than-for-formalities-state-derision-for-purpose-h-wayne-house
the-secret-fusion-is-fact-that-artists-eye-sees-in-nature-inexhaustible-wealth-tension-rhythms-continuities-contrasts-which-can-be-rendered-in-susanne-katherina-langer
i-have-always-lived-on-contrasts-to-me-only-death-is-monotony-beware-monotony-its-mother-all-deadly-sins-edith-wharton
one-who-knows-how-to-appreciate-color-relationships-influence-one-color-with-another-their-contrasts-dissonances-is-promised-infinite-variety-sonia-delaunay
we-live-in-time-greatest-precision-maximum-contrasts-photomontage-offers-us-means-to-express-this-it-shows-ideas-photography-shows-us-objects-herbert-bayer
san-francisco-is-breathtakingly-beautiful-city-with-lots-great-contrasts-between-dark-light-often-overlapping-each-other-its-great-setting-for-christopher-moore
employingnutrition-vitamin-therapyone-nations-largest-alcoholism-treatment-programs-reports-71-success-rate-this-contrasts-with-nationalrate-25-irwin-stone
gorbachevs-stance-contrasts-admirably-with-policy-sainted-abraham-lincoln-who-used-massive-force-mass-murder-to-force-seceding-southern-states-to-murray-rothbard
in-sharp-contrasts-to-traditional-art-modern-art-does-not-hide-fact-that-it-is-something-made-produced-on-contrary-it-underscores-fact-theodor-adorno
cop-shows-are-by-definition-melodramatic-theyre-larger-than-life-they-create-stark-contrasts-conflicts-emotionally-theyre-provocative-assuming-they-grapple-with-to-extent-that-co
walmart-what-walmart-does-contrasts-sharply-with-what-green-party-believes-bill-vaughan
life-is-defined-more-by-its-contrasts-than-its-samenesses-life-is-defined-more-by-its-risks-than-many-securities-mary-anne-radmacher
the-nature-life-is-to-be-study-contrasts-joysadness-fullempty-the-main-thing-is-to-keep-the-main-thing-the-main-thing-stephen-covey
There was a time in my life when I did a fair bit of work for the tempestuous Lucretia Stewart, then editor of the American Express travel magazine, Departures. Together, we evolved a harmless satire of the slightly driveling style employed by the journalists of tourism. 'Land of Contrasts' was our shorthand for it. ('Jerusalem: an enthralling blend of old and new.' 'South Africa: a harmony in black and white.' 'Belfast, where ancient meets modern.') It was as you can see, no difficult task. I began to notice a few weeks ago that my enemies in the 'peace' movement had decided to borrow from this tattered style book. The mantra, especially in the letters to this newspaper, was: 'Afghanistan, where the world's richest country rains bombs on the world's poorest country.' Poor fools. They should never have tried to beat me at this game. What about, 'Afghanistan, where the world's most open society confronts the world's most closed one'? 'Where American women pilots kill the men who enslave women.' 'Where the world's most indiscriminate bombers are bombed by the world's most accurate ones.' 'Where the largest number of poor people applaud the bombing of their own regime.' I could go on. (I think number four may need a little work.) But there are some suggested contrasts for the 'doves' to paste into their scrapbook. Incidentally, when they look at their scrapbooks they will be able to re-read themselves saying things like, 'The bombing of Kosovo is driving the Serbs into the arms of Milosevic.

Christopher Hitchens
there-was-time-in-my-life-when-i-did-fair-bit-work-for-tempestuous-lucretia-stewart-then-editor-american-express-travel-magazine-departures-together-we-evolved-harmless-satire-sl
i-have-taken-different-approach-one-that-i-hope-is-more-easily-accessible-to-readers-emotional-imagination-though-less-analytically-systematic-i-have-summoned-back-into-life-agai
In the history of philosophy, the term 'rationalism' has two distinct meanings. In one sense, it signifies an unbreached commitment to reasoned thought in contrast to any irrationalist rejection of the mind. In this sense, Aristotle and Ayn Rand are preeminent rationalists, opposed to any form of unreason, including faith. In a narrower sense, however, rationalism contrasts with empiricism as regards the false dichotomy between commitment to so-called 'pure' reason (i.e., reason detached from perceptual reality) and an exclusive reliance on sense experience (i.e., observation without inference therefrom). Rationalism, in this sense, is a commitment to reason construed as logical deduction from non-observational starting points, and a distrust of sense experience (e.g., the method of Descartes). Empiricism, according to this mistaken dichotomy, is a belief that sense experience provides factual knowledge, but any inference beyond observation is a mere manipulation of words or verbal symbols (e.g., the approach of Hume). Both Aristotle and Ayn Rand reject such a false dichotomy between reason and sense experience; neither are rationalists in this narrow sense. Theology is the purest expression of rationalism in the sense of proceeding by logical deduction from premises ungrounded in observable fact-deduction without reference to reality. The so-called 'thinking' involved here is purely formal, observationally baseless, devoid of facts, cut off from reality. Thomas Aquinas, for example, was history's foremost expert regarding the field of 'angelology.' No one could match his 'knowledge' of angels, and he devoted far more of his massive Summa Theologica to them than to physics.

Andrew Bernstein
in-history-philosophy-term-rationalism-has-two-distinct-meanings-in-one-sense-it-signifies-unbreached-commitment-to-reasoned-thought-in-contrast-to-any-irrationalist-rejection-mi
The ruinous deeds of the ravaging foe (Beowulf) The best-known long text in Old English is the epic poem Beowulf. Beowulf himself is a classic hero, who comes from afar. He has defeated the mortal enemy of the area - the monster Grendel - and has thus made the territory safe for its people. The people and the setting are both Germanic. The poem recalls a shared heroic past, somewhere in the general consciousness of the audience who would hear it. It starts with a mention of 'olden days', looking back, as many stories do, to an indefinite past ('once upon a time'), in which fact blends with fiction to make the tale. But the hero is a mortal man, and images of foreboding and doom prepare the way for a tragic outcome. He will be betrayed, and civil war will follow. Contrasts between splendour and destruction, success and failure, honour and betrayal, emerge in a story which contains a great many of the elements of future literature. Power, and the battles to achieve and hold on to power, are a main theme of literature in every culture - as is the theme of transience and mortality... . Beowulf can be read in many ways: as myth; as territorial history of the Baltic kingdoms in which it is set; as forward-looking reassurance. Questions of history, time and humanity are at the heart of it: it moves between past, present, and hope for the future, and shows its origins in oral tradition. It is full of human speech and sonorous images, and of the need to resolve and bring to fruition a proper human order, against the enemy - whatever it be - here symbolised by a monster and a dragon, among literature's earliest 'outsiders'... Beowulf has always attracted readers, and perhaps never more than in the 1990s when at least two major poets, the Scot Edwin Morgan and the Irishman Seamus Heaney, retranslated it into modern English. Heaney's version became a worldwide bestseller, and won many awards, taking one of the earliest texts of English literature to a vast new audience.

Ronald Carter
the-ruinous-deeds-ravaging-foe-beowulf-the-bestknown-long-text-in-old-english-is-epic-poem-beowulf-beowulf-himself-is-classic-hero-who-comes-from-afar-he-has-defeated-mortal-enem
It happens that in our phase of civility, the novel is the central form of literary art. It lends itself to explanations borrowed from any intellectual system of the universe which seems at the time satisfactory. Its history is an attempt to evade the laws of what Scott called 'the land of fiction'-the stereotypes which ignore reality, and whose remoteness from it we identify as absurd. From Cervantes forward it has been, when it has satisfied us, the poetry which is 'capable, ' in the words of Ortega, 'of coping with present reality.' But it is a 'realistic poetry' and its theme is, bluntly, 'the collapse of the poetic' because it has to do with 'the barbarous, brutal, mute, meaningless reality of things.' It cannot work with the old hero, or with the old laws of the land of romance; moreover, such new laws and customs as it creates have themselves to be repeatedly broken under the demands of a changed and no less brutal reality. 'Reality has such a violent temper that it does not tolerate the ideal even when reality itself is idealized.' Nevertheless, the effort continues to be made. The extremest revolt against the customs or laws of fiction-the antinovels of Fielding or Jane Austen or Flaubert or Natalie Sarraute-creates its new laws, in their turn to be broken. Even when there is a profession of complete narrative anarchy, as in some of the works I discussed last week, or in a poem such as Paterson, which rejects as spurious whatever most of us understand as form, it seems that time will always reveal some congruence with a paradigm-provided always that there is in the work that necessary element of the customary which enables it to communicate at all. I shall not spend much time on matters so familiar to you. Whether, with Luke¡cs, you think of the novel as peculiarly the resolution of the problem of the individual in an open society-or as relating to that problem in respect of an utterly contingent world; or express this in terms of the modern French theorists and call its progress a necessary and 'unceasing movement from the known to the unknown'; or simply see the novel as resembling the other arts in that it cannot avoid creating new possibilities for its own future-however you put it, the history of the novel is the history of forms rejected or modified, by parody, manifesto, neglect, as absurd. Nowhere else, perhaps, are we so conscious of the dissidence between inherited forms and our own reality. There is at present some good discussion of the issue not only in French but in English. Here I have in mind Iris Murdoch, a writer whose persistent and radical thinking about the form has not as yet been fully reflected in her own fiction. She contrasts what she calls 'crystalline form' with narrative of the shapeless, quasi-documentary kind, rejecting the first as uncharacteristic of the novel because it does not contain free characters, and the second because it cannot satisfy that need of form which it is easier to assert than to describe; we are at least sure that it exists, and that it is not always illicit. Her argument is important and subtle, and this is not an attempt to restate it; it is enough to say that Miss Murdoch, as a novelist, finds much difficulty in resisting what she calls 'the consolations of form' and in that degree damages the 'opacity, ' as she calls it, of character. A novel has this (and more) in common with love, that it is, so to speak, delighted with its own inventions of character, but must respect their uniqueness and their freedom. It must do so without losing the formal qualities that make it a novel. But the truly imaginative novelist has an unshakable 'respect for the contingent'; without it he sinks into fantasy, which is a way of deforming reality. 'Since reality is incomplete, art must not be too afraid of incompleteness, ' says Miss Murdoch. We must not falsify it with patterns too neat, too inclusive; there must be dissonance.

Frank Kermode
it-happens-that-in-our-phase-civility-novel-is-central-form-literary-art-it-lends-itself-to-explanations-borrowed-from-any-intellectual-system-universe-which-seems-at-time-satisf
I have just finished reading 'The Planner' by Tom Campbell. Its about James, a thoroughly decent but naive young city planner working for the London borough of Southwick. James, 32, has worked his way up the Southwick bureaucracy by dint of hard work, devotion to duty, and professional judgement. He has been responsible for a significant multi-purpose development and is an expert in how to survive lengthy meetings and local government practice. He has an intimate planning knowledge of London, its administrative districts, its zones and zoning regulations, its poverty rates, its demographic characteristics etc. But he knows almost nothing about the lifestyles of people who live there. The book opens on a scene where James has a get together with a few of his old friends from university. One has become a rich lawyer, one has become an even richer banker and his ex-girlfriend has become a well-known media celebrity. His friends all seem to be living glamorous and successful lives. They confront him with how dull he is; how little he has made of himself since he left university. He is filled with dissatisfaction with himself and the safe but dull life he leads. He decides he needs to brighten his life up a bit and start living a life more like that of his friends. Meanwhile, he is offered a position of Assistant Director of Planning for Nottingham (probably the UK of Hamilton, Palmy or New Plymouth) and he has 3 months to decide. He has to choose between a promotion to a safe but dull job in Nottingham, or a more glamorous life in London. He meets Felix, an advertising planner - one who designs advertising campaigns. Felix cares little about the buildings and connections of physical London, but is deeply knowledgeable about London society. He introduces James to a totally different London: London where the drug dealers live, London of high society, London of the rich and famous. He sets out to learn what he can about these aspects of London, hoping to earn the respect of his glamorous friends. In due course he begins to mix with developers whose aims are completely the opposite of his precious plan for Southwick The book is a wonderful depiction of the contrasts between city as built environment and city as lived environment. It raises questions about the value of public sector planning versus private sector development. It is also a delightful sketch of the temptations for a young planner to stray from the worthy objectives of public sector planning to private sector development; will James be lured away from his job as a local authority planner sincerely concerned about social issues such as public housing and street design, or will he be seduced by Felix and the glamorous world of the developers? Here's a lovely quote about a rumination of James as he crosses the wide open spaces of Canary Wharf, a part of London that was sold off by the state to private development: 'All of the people that James could see made a significant contribution to the wealth of the nation while making the world a worse place to live in. They worked in business services, and spent their lives helping international corporations to pay less tax, acquire commercial rivals, exploit monopoly positions, evade environmental regulations and skirt legal responsibilities. They were central to the functioning of the modern economy. Twenty thousand other people travelled in every day to make them coffee, serve them lunch and guard the buildings. It was, everyone had agreed, a tremendous success.' It is well worth a read.

Tom Campbell
i-have-just-finished-reading-the-planner-by-tom-campbell-its-about-james-thoroughly-decent-but-naive-young-city-planner-working-for-london-borough-southwick-james-32-has-worked-h
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