Copenhagen Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
you-must-come-to-copenhagen-to-work-with-us-we-like-people-who-can-actually-perform-thought-experiments-niels-bohr
if-i-were-forced-to-sum-up-in-one-sentence-what-copenhagen-interpretation-says-to-me-it-would-be-shut-up-calculate-david-mermin
ill-probably-stay-in-copenhagen-i-can-keep-writing-songs-about-my-local-community-about-crime
copenhagen-has-done-remarkable-job-creating-streets-that-are-focused-on-bicycles-pedestrians-alex-steffen
it-is-warm-work-this-day-may-be-last-to-any-us-at-moment-but-mark-you-i-would-not-be-elsewhere-for-thousands-at-battle-copenhagen
so-old-copenhagen-interpretation-needs-to-be-generalized-needs-to-be-replaced-by-something-that-can-be-used-for-whole-universe-can-be-used-also-in-cases-where-there-is-plenty-ind
i-saw-adaptation-ingmar-bergmans-fanny-alexander-at-royal-theatre-in-copenhagen-the-story-is-just-legendary-for-us-danes-it-was-really-well-done
places-like-belgium-south-france-sweden-copenhagen-are-really-alive-they-really-love-rock-n-roll-they-really-respond-tom-verlaine
in-copenhagen-we-all-ride-bicycles-everywhere-partly-because-it-is-impossible-to-park-car-but-also-because-you-can-cross-city-in-20-minutes-on-bike
im-really-looking-forward-to-playing-in-copenhagen-again-last-time-i-stayed-as-long-as-i-could-took-pictures-signed-autographs-hung-out-until-they-george-duke
the-discovery-vitamin-k-arose-from-some-studies-on-cholesterol-metabolism-chicks-carried-out-during-years-1928-1930-in-biochemical-institute-university-copenhagen
i-am-flying-back-to-new-york-as-i-write-this-i-will-never-forget-these-wonderful-35-days-i-would-go-back-to-copenhagen-in-heartbeat-to-work-there-tony-visconti
if-movie-had-ended-in-hollywood-fashion-copenhagen-climate-conference-in-2009-would-have-marked-culmination-global-fight-to-slow-changing-climate
in-copenhagen-theres-long-term-commitment-to-creating-well-functioning-pedestrian-city-where-all-forms-movement-pedestrian-bicycles-cars-public-transportation-are-accommodated-wi
Kamishna ... karibu, " alisema Nafi huku akisimama na kutupa gazeti mezani na kuchukua karatasi ya faksi, iliyotumwa. "Ahsante. Kuna nini ... " "Kamishna, imekuja faksi kutoka Oslo kama nilivyokueleza - katika simu. Inakutaka haraka, kesho, lazima kesho, kuwahi kikao Alhamisi mjini Copenhagen, " alisema Nafi huku akimpa kamishna karatasi ya faksi. "Mjini Copenhagen!" alisema kamishna kwa kutoamini. "Ndiyo, kamishna ... Sidhani kama kuna jambo la hatari lakini." "Nafi, nini kimetokea!" "Kamishna ... sijui. Kwa kweli sijui. Ilipofika, hii faksi, kitu cha kwanza niliongea na watu wa WIS kupata uthibitisho wao. Nao hawajui. Huenda ni mauaji ya jana ya Meksiko. Hii ni siri kubwa ya tume kamishna, na ndiyo maana Oslo wakaingilia kati." "Ndiyo. Kila mtu ameyasikia mauaji ya Meksiko. Ni mabaya. Kinachonishangaza ni kwamba, jana niliongea na makamu ... kuhusu mabadiliko ya katiba ya WODEA. Hakunambia chochote kuhusu mkutano wa kesho!" "Kamishna, nakusihi kuwa makini. Dalili zinaonyesha hali si nzuri hata kidogo. Hawa ni wadhalimu tu ... wa madawa ya kulevya." "Vyema!" alijibu kamishna kwa jeuri na hasira. Halafu akaendelea, "Kuna cha ziada?" "Ijumaa, kama tulivyoongea wiki iliyopita, nasafiri kwenda Afrika Kusini." "Kikao kinafanyika Alhamisi, Nafi, huwezi kusafiri Ijumaa ... " "Binti yangu atafukuzwa shule, kam ... " "Nafi, ongea na chuo ... wambie umepata dharura utaondoka Jumatatu; utawaona Jumanne ... Fuata maadili ya kazi tafadhali. Safari yako si muhimu hivyo kulinganisha na tume!" "Sawa! Profesa. Niwie radhi, nimekuelewa, samahani sana. Samahani sana.

Enock Maregesi
kamishna-karibu-alisema-nafi-huku-akisimama-na-kutupa-gazeti-mezani-na-kuchukua-karatasi-ya-faksi-iliyotumwa-ahsante-kuna-nini-kamishna-imekuja-faksi-kutoka-oslo-kama-nilivyokuel
Civic imagination and innovation and creativity are emerging from local ecosystems now and radiating outward, and this great innovation, this great wave of localism that's now arriving, and you see it in how people eat and work and share and buy and move and live their everyday lives, this isn't some precious parochialism, this isn't some retreat into insularity, no. This is emergent. The localism of our time is networked powerfully. And so, for instance, consider the ways that strategies for making cities more bike-friendly have spread so rapidly from Copenhagen to New York to Austin to Boston to Seattle. Think about how experiments in participatory budgeting, where everyday citizens get a chance to allocate and decide upon the allocation of city funds. Those experiments have spread from Porto Alegre, Brazil to here in New York City, to the wards of Chicago. Migrant workers from Rome to Los Angeles and many cities between are now organizing to stage strikes to remind the people who live in their cities what a day without immigrants would look like. In China, all across that country, members of the New Citizens' Movement are beginning to activate and organize to fight official corruption and graft, and they're drawing the ire of officials there, but they're also drawing the attention of anti-corruption activists all around the world. In Seattle, where I'm from, we've become part of a great global array of cities that are now working together bypassing government altogether, national government altogether, in order to try to meet the carbon reduction goals of the Kyoto Protocol. All of these citizens, united, are forming a web, a great archipelago of power that allows us to bypass brokenness and monopolies of control.

Eric Liu
civic-imagination-innovation-creativity-are-emerging-from-local-ecosystems-now-radiating-outward-this-great-innovation-this-great-wave-localism-thats-now-arriving-you-see-it-in-h
Bohr is really doing what the Stoic allegorists did to close the gap between their world and Homer's, or what St. Augustine did when he explained, against the evidence, the concord of the canonical scriptures. The dissonances as well as the harmonies have to be made concordant by means of some ultimate complementarity. Later biblical scholarship has sought different explanations, and more sophisticated concords; but the motive is the same, however the methods may differ. An epoch, as Einstein remarked, is the instruments of its research. Stoic physics, biblical typology, Copenhagen quantum theory, are all different, but all use concord-fictions and assert complementarities. Such fictions meet a need. They seem to do what Bacon said poetry could: 'give some show of satisfaction to the mind, wherein the nature of things doth seem to deny it.' Literary fictions ( Bacon's 'poetry') do likewise. One consequence is that they change, for the same reason that patristic allegory is not the same thing, though it may be essentially the same kind of thing, as the physicists' Principle of Complementarity. The show of satisfaction will only serve when there seems to be a degree of real compliance with reality as we, from time to time, imagine it. Thus we might imagine a constant value for the irreconcileable observations of the reason and the imagination, the one immersed in chronos, the other in kairos; but the proportions vary indeterminably. Or, when we find 'what will suffice, ' the element of what I have called the paradigmatic will vary. We measure and order time with our fictions; but time seems, in reality, to be ever more diverse and less and less subject to any uniform system of measurement. Thus we think of the past in very different timescales, according to what we are doing; the time of the art-historian is different from that of the geologist, that of the football coach from the anthropologist's. There is a time of clocks, a time of radioactive carbon, a time even of linguistic change, as in lexicostatics. None of these is the same as the 'structural' or 'family' time of sociology. George Kubler in his book The Shape of Time distinguished between 'absolute' and 'systematic' age, a hierarchy of durations from that of the coral reef to that of the solar year. Our ways of filling the interval between the tick and tock must grow more difficult and more selfcritical, as well as more various; the need we continue to feel is a need of concord, and we supply it by increasingly varied concord-fictions. They change as the reality from which we, in the middest, seek a show of satisfaction, changes; because 'times change.' The fictions by which we seek to find 'what will suffice' change also. They change because we no longer live in a world with an historical tick which will certainly be consummated by a definitive tock. And among all the other changing fictions, literary fictions take their place. They find out about the changing world on our behalf; they arrange our complementarities. They do this, for some of us, perhaps better than history, perhaps better than theology, largely because they are consciously false; but the way to understand their development is to see how they are related to those other fictional systems. It is not that we are connoisseurs of chaos, but that we are surrounded by it, and equipped for coexistence with it only by our fictive powers. This may, in the absence of a supreme fiction-or the possibility of it, be a hard fate; which is why the poet of that fiction is compelled to say From this the poem springs: that we live in a place That is not our own, and much more, nor ourselves And hard it is, in spite of blazoned days.

Frank Kermode
bohr-is-really-doing-what-stoic-allegorists-did-to-close-gap-between-their-world-homers-what-st-augustine-did-when-he-explained-against-evidence-concord-canonical-scriptures-the-
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