Dissonance Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
when-dissonance-is-present-in-addition-to-trying-to-reduce-it-person-will-actively-avoid-situations-information-which-would-likely-increase-leon-festinger
dissonance-if-you-are-interested-leads-to-discovery-william-carlos-williams
there-has-always-been-strange-dissonance-between-public-private-in-nigeria-chimamanda-ngozi-adichie
music-in-movies-is-all-about-dissonance-and-consonance-tension-and-release
because-propaganda-induced-cognitive-dissonance-most-people-hate-themselves-dont-even-know-it-bryant-mcgill
theres-this-presence-these-missing-people-this-lost-community-that-i-felt-but-could-not-see-that-was-strange-dissonance-for-me-shimon-attie
i-think-that-president-needs-to-have-variety-views-presented-but-also-there-has-to-be-team-effort-because-otherwise-i-think-it-creates-dissonance-madeleine-albright
compartmentalization-is-unconscious-psychological-defense-mechanism-employed-to-avoid-cognitive-dissonance-zack-love
i-have-never-quite-grasped-worry-about-power-press-after-all-it-speaks-with-thousand-voices-in-constant-dissonance
articulate-words-are-harsh-clamor-dissonance-when-man-arrives-at-his-highest-perfection-he-will-again-be-dumb-nathaniel-hawthorne
i-think-dissonance-in-music-makes-you-think-it-isnt-oh-thats-pretty-melody-i-can-whistle-you-have-to-sit-down-listen-to-tell-it-apart-from-other-things
when-i-had-my-first-experiences-choral-singing-dissonance-those-close-harmonies-was-exquisite-that-i-would-giggle-i-would-tear-up-i-felt-it-in-physical-way
my-music-is-tonally-based-there-is-plenty-dissonance-but-its-used-as-contrast-there-is-polytonality-at-times-lot-rhythmic-interplay
youll-be-pleased-to-hear-christopher-that-i-am-no-longer-muslim-liberal-but-atheist-i-find-that-it-obviates-necessity-for-any-cognitive-dissonance-ayaan-hirsi-ali
if-only-all-contradictory-voices-shouting-in-my-head-would-calm-down-sing-song-in-unison-whatever-it-was-i-wouldnt-care-as-long-as-they-sang-ralph-ellison
for-better-for-worse-in-the-last-savage-i-have-dared-to-do-away-completely-with-fashionable-dissonance-in-modest-way-i-have-endeavored-to-rediscover-nobility-gracefulness-pleasur
am-i-only-one-who-cant-seem-to-reconcile-grand-canyon-cognitive-dissonance-i-feel-when-people-with-much-more-important-jobs-than-i-have-manage-to-score-much-lengthier-times-off
the-vast-majority-americans-at-all-coordinates-economic-spectrum-consider-themselves-middle-class-this-is-deeply-ingrained-distinctly-american-cognitive-dissonance-ellen-cushing
i-tend-to-work-on-principle-that-much-humour-relies-on-cognitive-dissonance-on-foreground-not-matching-background-on-protagonists-response-to-situation-being-inappropriate-on
life-is-desert-shifting-sand-dunes-unpredictable-erratic-harmony-changes-into-dissonance-immediate-outlives-profound-esoteric-becomes-cliched-and-ella-leya
a-movie-can-should-have-some-real-dissonance-throughout-rage-heartache-tears-conflict-catharsis-all-other-elements-aristotle-demanded-good-story-josh-radnor
true-believers-are-continually-shown-by-reality-that-their-god-doesnt-exist-but-have-developed-extensive-coping-mechanisms-to-deal-with-this-cognitive-mark-thomas
the-human-brain-has-unique-ability-to-doubt-reality-presented-to-itself-to-comprehend-dissonance-between-ideas-truth-surrounding-world-god-knows-this-it-infuriates-him-it-terrifi
if-person-plays-dissonance-long-enough-it-will-sound-like-consonance-its-language-that-was-alien-then-its-less-less-alien-as-it-continues-to-live-keith-jarrett
the-easiest-way-to-disturb-create-element-horror-is-to-take-positive-emotion-put-it-in-negative-situation-to-create-dissonance-rr-hood
i-suspect-that-lot-stress-we-see-around-us-arises-from-cognitive-dissonance-set-up-by-one-side-brain-hearing-plausible-spin-while-other-side-david-palmer
situations-produce-vibrations-negative-potentially-harmful-situations-emit-slow-vibrations-positive-potentially-lifeenhancing-situations-emit-quick-vibrations-as-these-vibrations
I'd finally reached the end of myself, all my self-reliance and denial and pride unraveling into nothingness, leaving only a blank Alison-shaped space behind. It was finished. I was done. But just as I felt myself dissolving on the tide of my own self-condemnation, the dark waves receded, and I floated into a celestial calm. I saw the whole universe laid out before me, a vast shining machine of indescribable beauty and complexity. Its design was too intricate for me to understand, and I knew I could never begin to grasp more than the smallest idea of its purpose. But I sensed that every part of it, from quark to quasar, was unique and - in some mysterious way - significant. I heard the universe as an oratorio sung by a master choir of stars, accompanied by the orchestra of the planets and the percussion of satellites and moons. The aria they performed was a song to break the heart, full of tragic dissonance and deferred hope, and yet somewhere beneath it all was a peircing refrain of glory, glory, glory. And I sensed that not only the grand movements of the cosmos, but everything that had happened in my life, was a part of that song. Even the hurts that seemed most senseless, the mistakes I would have done anything to erase - nothing could make those things good, but good could still come out of them all the same, and in the end the oratorio would be no less beautiful for it. I realized then that even though I was a tiny speck in an infinite cosmos, a blip on the timeline of eternity, I was not without purpose. And as long as I had a part in the music of the spheres, even if it was only a single grace not, I was not worthless. Nor was I alone. God help me, I prayed as I gathered up my raw and weary sense, flung them into the wormhole - And at last, found what I'd been looking for.

R.J. Anderson
id-finally-reached-end-myself-all-my-selfreliance-denial-pride-unraveling-into-nothingness-leaving-only-blank-alisonshaped-space-behind-it-was-finished-i-was-done-but-just-as-i-f
By far, the most important distortions and confabulations of memory are those that serve to justify and explain our own lives. The mind, sense-making organ that it is, does not interpret our experiences as if they were shattered shards of glass; it assembles them into a mosaic. From the distance of years, we see the mosaic's pattern. It seems tangible, unchangeable; we can't imagine how we could reconfigure those pieces into another design. But it is a result of years of telling our story, shaping it into a life narrative that is complete with heroes and villians, an account of how we came to be the way we are. Because that narrative is the way we understand the world and our place in it, it is bigger than the sum of its parts. If on part, one memory, is shown to be wrong, people have to reduce the resulting dissonance and even rethink the basic mental category: you mean Dad (Mom) wasn't such a bad (good) person after all? You mean Dad (Mom) was a complex human being? The life narrative may be fundamentally true; Your father or mother might really have been hateful, or saintly. The problem is that when the narrative becomes a major source of self-justification, one the storyteller relies on to excuse mistakes and failings, memory becomes warped in its service. The storyteller remembers only the confirming examples of the parent's malevolence and forgets the dissonant instances of the parent's good qualities. Over time, as the story hardens, it becomes more difficult to see the whole parent - the mixture of good and bad, strengths and flaws, good intentions and unfortunate blunders. Memories create our stories, but our stories also create our memories.

Carol Tavris
by-far-most-important-distortions-confabulations-memory-are-those-that-serve-to-justify-explain-our-own-lives-the-mind-sensemaking-organ-that-it-is-does-not-interpret-our-experie
It happens that in our phase of civility, the novel is the central form of literary art. It lends itself to explanations borrowed from any intellectual system of the universe which seems at the time satisfactory. Its history is an attempt to evade the laws of what Scott called 'the land of fiction'-the stereotypes which ignore reality, and whose remoteness from it we identify as absurd. From Cervantes forward it has been, when it has satisfied us, the poetry which is 'capable, ' in the words of Ortega, 'of coping with present reality.' But it is a 'realistic poetry' and its theme is, bluntly, 'the collapse of the poetic' because it has to do with 'the barbarous, brutal, mute, meaningless reality of things.' It cannot work with the old hero, or with the old laws of the land of romance; moreover, such new laws and customs as it creates have themselves to be repeatedly broken under the demands of a changed and no less brutal reality. 'Reality has such a violent temper that it does not tolerate the ideal even when reality itself is idealized.' Nevertheless, the effort continues to be made. The extremest revolt against the customs or laws of fiction-the antinovels of Fielding or Jane Austen or Flaubert or Natalie Sarraute-creates its new laws, in their turn to be broken. Even when there is a profession of complete narrative anarchy, as in some of the works I discussed last week, or in a poem such as Paterson, which rejects as spurious whatever most of us understand as form, it seems that time will always reveal some congruence with a paradigm-provided always that there is in the work that necessary element of the customary which enables it to communicate at all. I shall not spend much time on matters so familiar to you. Whether, with Luke¡cs, you think of the novel as peculiarly the resolution of the problem of the individual in an open society-or as relating to that problem in respect of an utterly contingent world; or express this in terms of the modern French theorists and call its progress a necessary and 'unceasing movement from the known to the unknown'; or simply see the novel as resembling the other arts in that it cannot avoid creating new possibilities for its own future-however you put it, the history of the novel is the history of forms rejected or modified, by parody, manifesto, neglect, as absurd. Nowhere else, perhaps, are we so conscious of the dissidence between inherited forms and our own reality. There is at present some good discussion of the issue not only in French but in English. Here I have in mind Iris Murdoch, a writer whose persistent and radical thinking about the form has not as yet been fully reflected in her own fiction. She contrasts what she calls 'crystalline form' with narrative of the shapeless, quasi-documentary kind, rejecting the first as uncharacteristic of the novel because it does not contain free characters, and the second because it cannot satisfy that need of form which it is easier to assert than to describe; we are at least sure that it exists, and that it is not always illicit. Her argument is important and subtle, and this is not an attempt to restate it; it is enough to say that Miss Murdoch, as a novelist, finds much difficulty in resisting what she calls 'the consolations of form' and in that degree damages the 'opacity, ' as she calls it, of character. A novel has this (and more) in common with love, that it is, so to speak, delighted with its own inventions of character, but must respect their uniqueness and their freedom. It must do so without losing the formal qualities that make it a novel. But the truly imaginative novelist has an unshakable 'respect for the contingent'; without it he sinks into fantasy, which is a way of deforming reality. 'Since reality is incomplete, art must not be too afraid of incompleteness, ' says Miss Murdoch. We must not falsify it with patterns too neat, too inclusive; there must be dissonance.

Frank Kermode
it-happens-that-in-our-phase-civility-novel-is-central-form-literary-art-it-lends-itself-to-explanations-borrowed-from-any-intellectual-system-universe-which-seems-at-time-satisf
We are all poor; but there is a difference between what Mrs. Spark intends by speaking of 'slender means', and what Stevens called our poverty or Sartre our need, besoin. The poet finds his brief, fortuitous concords, it is true: not merely 'what will suffice, ' but 'the freshness of transformation, ' the 'reality of decreation, ' the 'gaiety of language.' The novelist accepts need, the difficulty of relating one's fictions to what one knows about the nature of reality, as his donnee. It is because no one has said more about this situation, or given such an idea of its complexity, that I want to devote most of this talk to Sartre and the most relevant of his novels, La Nausee. As things go now it isn't of course very modern; Robbe-Grillet treats it with amused reverence as a valuable antique. But it will still serve for my purposes. This book is doubtless very well known to you; I can't undertake to tell you much about it, especially as it has often been regarded as standing in an unusually close relation to a body of philosophy which I am incompetent to expound. Perhaps you will be charitable if I explain that I shall be using it and other works of Sartre merely as examples. What I have to do is simply to show that La Nausee represents, in the work of one extremely important and representative figure, a kind of crisis in the relation between fiction and reality, the tension or dissonance between paradigmatic form and contingent reality. That the mood of Sartre has sometimes been appropriate to the modern demythologized apocalypse is something I shall take for granted; his is a philosophy of crisis, but his world has no beginning and no end. The absurd dishonesty of all prefabricated patterns is cardinal to his beliefs; to cover reality over with eidetic images-illusions persisting from past acts of perception, as some abnormal children 'see' the page or object that is no longer before them -to do this is to sink into mauvaise foi. This expression covers all comfortable denials of the undeniable-freedom -by myths of necessity, nature, or things as they are. Are all the paradigms of fiction eidetic? Is the unavoidable, insidious, comfortable enemy of all novelists mauvaise foi? Sartre has recently, in his first instalment of autobiography, talked with extraordinary vivacity about the roleplaying of his youth, of the falsities imposed upon him by the fictive power of words. At the beginning of the Great War he began a novel about a French private who captured the Kaiser, defeated him in single combat, and so ended the war and recovered Alsace. But everything went wrong. The Kaiser, hissed by the poilus, no match for the superbly fit Private Perrin, spat upon and insulted, became 'somehow heroic.' Worse still, the peace, which should instantly have followed in the real world if this fiction had a genuine correspondence with reality, failed to occur. 'I very nearly renounced literature, ' says Sartre. Roquentin, in a subtler but basically similar situation, has the same reaction. Later Sartre would find again that the hero, however assiduously you use the pitchfork, will recur, and that gaps, less gross perhaps, between fiction and reality will open in the most close-knit pattern of words. Again, the young Sartre would sometimes, when most identified with his friends at the lycee, feel himself to be 'freed at last from the sin of existing'-this is also an expression of Roquentin's, but Roquentin says it feels like being a character in a novel. How can novels, by telling lies, convert existence into being? We see Roquentin waver between the horror of contingency and the fiction of aventures. In Les Mots Sartre very engagingly tells us that he was Roquentin, certainly, but that he was Sartre also, 'the elect, the chronicler of hells' to whom the whole novel of which he now speaks so derisively was a sort of aventure, though what was represented within it was 'the unjustified, brackish existence of my fellow-creatures.

Frank Kermode
we-are-all-poor-but-there-is-difference-between-what-mrs-spark-intends-by-speaking-slender-means-what-stevens-called-our-poverty-sartre-our-need-besoin-the-poet-finds-his-brief-f
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