Enrollment Quotes

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Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
pension-reforms-like-investment-advice-and-automatic-enrollment-will-strengthen-the-ability-of-americans-to-save-and-invest-for-retirement
enrollment-in-colorado-is-expected-to-expand-about-25-percent-in-seven-years-its-difficult-to-find-those-additional-funds-therefore-i-think-youre-roy-romer
at-top-state-institutions-like-ucla-berkeley-university-texas-however-trend-downward-minority-enrollment-remains-persistent-discouraging
enrollment-in-colleges-especially-black-colleges-across-country-increased-tremendously-during-five-year-run-a-different-world-i-dont-think-you-could-have-better-legacy-than-that
My mother delayed my enrollment in the Fascist scouts, the Balilla, as long as possible, firstly because she did not want me to learn how to handle weapons, but also because the meetings that were then held on Sunday mornings (before the Fascist Saturday was instituted) consisted mostly of a Mass in the scouts' chapel. When I had to be enrolled as part of my school duties, she asked that I be excused from the Mass; this was impossible for disciplinary reasons, but my mother saw to it that the chaplain and the commander were aware that I was not a Catholic and that I should not be asked to perform any external acts of devotion in church. In short, I often found myself in situations different from others, looked on as if I were some strange animal. I do not think this harmed me: one gets used to persisting in one's habits, to finding oneself isolated for good reasons, to putting up with the discomfort that this causes, to finding the right way to hold on to positions which are not shared by the majority. But above all I grew up tolerant of others' opinions, particularly in the field of religion, remembering how irksome it was to hear myself mocked because I did not follow the majority's beliefs. And at the same time I have remained totally devoid of that taste for anticlericalism which is so common in those who are educated surrounded by religion. I have insisted on setting down these memories because I see that many non-believing friends let their children have a religious education 'so as not to give them complexes', 'so that they don't feel different from the others.' I believe that this behavior displays a lack of courage which is totally damaging pedagogically. Why should a young child not begin to understand that you can face a small amount of discomfort in order to stay faithful to an idea? And in any case, who said that young people should not have complexes? Complexes arise through a natural attrition with the reality that surrounds us, and when you have complexes you try to overcome them. Life is in fact nothing but this triumphing over one's own complexes, without which the formation of a character and personality does not happen.

Italo Calvino
my-mother-delayed-my-enrollment-in-fascist-scouts-balilla-as-long-as-possible-firstly-because-she-did-not-want-me-to-learn-how-to-handle-weapons-but-also-because-meetings-that-we
Muslim identity and thought in Nigeria derive from the Sufi brotherhoods of Qadiriyya and Tijaniyya, primarily as a result of the historical role of the Kanem-Borno and Sokoto caliphates in the spread of Islam. The Sufi orders and the Izalatul Bidi'a wa Ikhamatis Sunnah (People Committed to the Removal of Innovations in Islam; hereafter Izala) are the two dominant contemporary Muslim foci of identity. The disdain towards and fear of boko (Western education) arose from its historically close association with the colonial state and Christian missionaries. This also suited colonial educational policy well, as the British had no intention of widespread education anyway. The aim of colonial education, particularly in northern Nigeria, was to maintain the existing status quo by 'imparting some literacy to the aristocratic class, to the exclusion of the commoner classes' (Tukur 1979: 866). By the 1930s, colonial education had produced a limited cadre of Western-educated elite, who were conscious of their education and were yearning to play a role in society. Mainly children of the aristocratic class, the type of education they received was 'different from the traditional education in their various societies, and this by itself was enough to mark them out as a group' (Kwanashie 2002: 50). This new education enabled them to climb the social and economic ladder over and above their peers who had a different kind of education, Quranic education. This was the origin of the animosity and distrust between the traditionally educated and Western-educated elite in northern Nigeria. Though subordinate to the Europeans, these educated elite were perceived as collaborators by their Arabic-educated fellows. Thus the antagonism towards Western education continues in many northern Nigerian communities, which have defied government campaigns for school enrollment to this day.

Kyari Mohammed
muslim-identity-thought-in-nigeria-derive-from-sufi-brotherhoods-qadiriyya-tijaniyya-primarily-as-result-historical-role-kanemborno-sokoto-caliphates-in-spread-islam-the-sufi-ord
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