Epistemology Quotes

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epistemology-without-contact-with-science-becomes-empty-scheme-science-without-epistemology-isinsofar-as-it-is-thinkable-at-allprimitive-muddled-albert-einstein
epistemology-is-the-study-of-knowledge-by-what-conduit-do-we-know-what-we-know
it-is-the-faithfulness-of-god-that-allows-epistemology-to-model-ontology
in-genetic-epistemology-as-in-developmental-psychology-too-there-is-never-absolute-beginning
the-clash-between-popper-kuhn-is-not-about-mere-technical-point-in-epistemology
accuracy-signal-free-flow-information-define-sanity-in-my-epistemology-robert-anton-wilson
epistemology-has-always-been-affected-by-technologies-like-telescope-microscope-things-that-have-created-radical-shift-in-how-we-sense-physical-reality
if-somebody-is-going-to-try-to-paste-persons-view-on-epistemology-to-me-then-give-me-thomas-aquinas-dont-give-me-ayn-rand-paul-ryan
a-man-active-resilient-mind-outwears-his-friendships-just-as-certainly-as-he-outwears-his-love-affairs-his-politics-his-epistemology-henry-louis-mencken
Eliot's understanding of poetic epistemology is a version of Bradley's theory, outlined in our second chapter, that knowing involves immediate, relational, and transcendent stages or levels. The poetic mind, like the ordinary mind, has at least two types of experience: The first consists largely of feeling (falling in love, smelling the cooking, hearing the noise of the typewriter), the second largely of thought (reading Spinoza). The first type of experience is sensuous, and it is also to a great extent monistic or immediate, for it does not require mediation through the mind; it exists before intellectual analysis, before the falling apart of experience into experiencer and experienced. The second type of experience, in contrast, is intellectual (to be known at all, it must be mediated through the mind) and sharply dualistic, in that it involves a breaking down of experience into subject and object. In the mind of the ordinary person, these two types of experience are and remain disparate. In the mind of the poet, these disparate experiences are somehow transcended and amalgamated into a new whole, a whole beyond and yet including subject and object, mind and matter. Eliot illustrates his explanation of poetic epistemology by saying that John Donne did not simply feel his feelings and think his thoughts; he felt his thoughts and thought his feelings. He was able to "feel his thought as immediately as the odour of a rose." Immediately" in this famous simile is a technical term in philosophy, used with precision; it means unmediated through mind, unshattered into subject and object. Falling in love and reading Spinoza typify Eliot's own experiences in the years in which he was writing The Waste Land. These were the exciting and exhausting years in which he met Vivien Haigh-Wood and consummated a disastrous marriage, the years in which he was deeply involved in reading F. H. Bradley, the years in which he was torn between the professions of philosophy and poetry and in which he was in close and frequent contact with such brilliant and stimulating figures as Bertrand Russell and Ezra Pound, the years of the break from his family and homeland, the years in which in every area of his life he seemed to be between broken worlds. The experiences of these years constitute the material of The Waste Land. The relevant biographical details need not be reviewed here, for they are presented in the introduction to The Waste Land Facsimile. For our purposes, it is only necessary to acknowledge what Eliot himself acknowledged: the material of art is always actual life. At the same time, it should also be noted that material in itself is not art. As Eliot argued in his review of Ulysses, "in creation you are responsible for what you can do with material which you must simply accept." For Eliot, the given material included relations with and observations of women, in particular, of his bright but seemingly incurably ill wife Vivien(ne).

Jewel Spears Brooker
eliots-understanding-poetic-epistemology-is-version-bradleys-theory-outlined-in-our-second-chapter-that-knowing-involves-immediate-relational-transcendent-stages-levels-the-poeti
there-is-nothing-wrong-with-entertainment-as-some-psychiatrist-once-put-it-we-all-build-castles-in-air-the-problems-come-when-we-try-to-live-in-them-the-communications-media-late
we-commonly-speak-as-though-single-thing-could-have-some-characteristic-a-stone-we-say-is-hard-small-heavy-yellow-dense-etc-that-is-how-our-language-is-made-the-stone-is-hard-and
Eliot's own reflections on the primitive mind as a model for nondualistic thinking and on the nature and consequences of different modes of consciousness were informed by an excellent education in the social sciences and philosophy. As a prelude to our guided tour of the text of The Waste Land, we now turn to a brief survey of some of his intellectual preoccupations in the decade before he wrote it, preoccupations which in our view are enormously helpful in understanding the form of the poem. Eliot entered Harvard as a freshman in 1906 and finished his doctoral dissertation in 1916, with one of the academic years spent at the Sorbonne and one at Oxford. At Harvard and Oxford, he had as teachers some of modern philosophy's most distinguished individuals, including George Santayana, Josiah Royce, Bertrand Russell, and Harold Joachim; and while at the Sorbonne, he attended the lectures of Henri Bergson, a philosophic star in Paris in 1910-11. Under the supervision of Royce, Eliot wrote his dissertation on the epistemology of F. H. Bradley, a major voice in the late-nineteenth-, early-twentieth-century crisis in philosophy. Eliot extended this period of concentration on philosophical problems by devoting much of his time between 1915 and the early twenties to book reviewing. His education and early book reviewing occurred during the period of epistemological disorientation described in our first chapter, the period of "betweenness" described by Heidegger and Ortega y Gasset, the period of the revolt against dualism described by Lovejoy. 2 Eliot's personal awareness of the contemporary epistemological crisis was intensified by the fact that while he was writing his dissertation on Bradley he and his new wife were actually living with Bertrand Russell. Russell as the representative of neorealism and Bradley as the representative of neoidealism were perhaps the leading expositors of opposite responses to the crisis discussed in our first chapter. Eliot's situation was extraordinary. He was a close student of both Bradley and Russell; he had studied with Bradley's friend and disciple Harold Joachim and with Russell himself. And in 1915-16, while writing a dissertation explaining and in general defending Bradley against Russell, Eliot found himself face to face with Russell across the breakfast table. Moreover, as the husband of a fragile wife to whom both men (each in his own way) were devoted, Eliot must have found life to be a kaleidoscope of brilliant and fluctuating patterns.

Jewel Spears Brooker
eliots-own-reflections-on-primitive-mind-as-model-for-nondualistic-thinking-on-nature-consequences-different-modes-consciousness-were-informed-by-excellent-education-in-social-sc
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