Grandly Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
thou-art-grandly-mae-than-couth
converse-with-mind-that-is-grandly-simple-literature-looks-like-wordcatching-ralph-waldo-emerson
i-dont-mean-this-grandly-but-it-was-never-my-intention-to-live-in-la-do-big-network-show-damian-lewis
immense-selfmade-wealth-is-evidence-grandly-rich-mind-julian-pencilliah
a-science-fiction-writer-should-try-to-combine-intimately-human-with-grandly-cosmic-robert-j-sawyer
old-age-the-estuary-that-enlarges-spreads-itself-grandly-as-it-pours-into-great-sea-walt-whitman
a-woman-with-romance-in-her-life-lived-as-grandly-as-queen-because-her-heart-was-treasured-nora-roberts
in-this-horror-solitude-this-need-to-lose-his-ego-in-exterior-flesh-which-man-calls-grandly-need-for-love-charles-baudelaire
i-wasted-lot-years-working-on-my-writing-grandly-saying-and-now-my-novel-which-would-soon-be-reduced-to-short-story-then-to-paragraph-george-saunders
whats-thinking-you-live-in-grandly-appointed-house-but-spend-all-your-time-rummaging-around-in-attic-for-any-little-trinket-you-hadnt-known-was-james-richardson
my-personal-mission-statement-is-to-combine-intimately-human-grandly-cosmic-i-like-to-think-that-science-fiction-works-on-these-two-different-scales
life-on-open-road-is-liberty-to-be-alone-to-have-few-needs-to-be-unknown-everywhere-foreigner-at-home-to-walk-grandly-solitarily-in-conquest-isabelle-eberhardt
science-fiction-invites-writer-to-grandly-explore-alternative-worlds-pose-questions-about-meaning-destiny-lawrence-wright
how-well-he-fell-asleepl-like-some-proud-river-widening-toward-sea-calmly-grandly-silently-deep-life-joined-eternity-samuel-taylor-coleridge
always-live-your-life-with-your-biography-in-mind-dad-was-fond-saying-naturally-it-wont-be-published-unless-you-have-magnificent-reason-but-at-least-you-will-be-living-grandly-ma
its-as-empty-as-merchants-soul-sorry-kheldar-its-just-old-expression-thats-all-right-beldin-silk-forgave-him-grandly-these-little-slips-tongue-are-david-eddings
july-2-a-beautiful-day-for-labrador-went-ashore-killed-nothing-but-was-pleased-with-what-i-saw-the-country-is-grandly-wild-desolate-that-i-am-charmed-by-its-wonderful-dreariness
i-count-this-thing-to-be-grandly-true-that-noble-deed-is-step-toward-god-lifting-soul-from-common-clod-to-purer-air-broader-view-j-g-holland
i-have-read-women-who-have-been-strongly-grandly-brave-sometimes-i-have-dreamed-that-i-might-be-brave-the-possibilities-this-life-are-magnificent-mary-maclane
those-who-think-that-in-order-to-dress-well-it-is-necessary-to-dress-extravagantly-grandly-make-great-mistake-nothing-well-becomes-true-feminine-george-d-prentice
i-am-prejudiced-in-favor-him-who-without-impudence-can-ask-boldly-he-has-faith-in-humanity-faith-in-himself-no-one-who-is-not-accustomed-to-giving-johann-kaspar-lavater
the-most-important-things-must-be-said-simply-for-they-are-spoiled-by-bombast-whereas-trivial-things-must-be-described-grandly-for-they-are-supported-jean-de-la-bruyere
a-poem-with-grandly-conceived-executed-stanzas-such-as-one-keatss-odes-should-be-like-enfilade-rooms-in-palace-one-proceeds-with-eager-james-fenton
our-little-solos-are-note-in-immense-chorus-vibrating-grandly-through-universe-chorus-which-accepts-harmonizes-whir-cricket-long-drumroll-harriet-monroe
being-young-is-wonderful-but-one-secrets-being-human-individual-mature-human-individual-shall-we-put-it-rather-grandly-is-that-you-can-see-this-clive-james
the-greeks-said-grandly-in-their-tragic-phrase-let-no-one-be-called-happy-till-his-death-to-which-i-would-add-let-no-one-till-his-death-be-called-elizabeth-barrett-browning
The formerly absolute distinction between time and eternity in Christian thought-between nunc movens with its beginning and end, and nunc stans, the perfect possession of endless life-acquired a third intermediate order based on this peculiar betwixt-and-between position of angels. But like the Principle of Complementarity, this concord-fiction soon proved that it had uses outside its immediate context, angelology. Because it served as a means of talking about certain aspects of human experience, it was humanized. It helped one to think about the sense, men sometimes have of participating in some order of duration other than that of the nunc movens-of being able, as it were, to do all that angels can. Such are those moments which Augustine calls the moments of the soul's attentiveness; less grandly, they are moments of what psychologists call 'temporal integration.' When Augustine recited his psalm he found in it a figure for the integration of past, present, and future which defies successive time. He discovered what is now erroneously referred to as 'spatial form.' He was anticipating what we know of the relation between books and St. Thomas's third order of duration-for in the kind of time known by books a moment has endless perspectives of reality. We feel, in Thomas Mann's words, that 'in their beginning exists their middle and their end, their past invades the present, and even the most extreme attention to the present is invaded by concern for the future.' The concept of aevum provides a way of talking about this unusual variety of duration-neither temporal nor eternal, but, as Aquinas said, participating in both the temporal and the eternal. It does not abolish time or spatialize it; it co-exists with time, and is a mode in which things can be perpetual without being eternal. We've seen that the concept of aevum grew out of a need to answer certain specific Averroistic doctrines concerning origins. But it appeared quite soon that this medium inter aeternitatem et tempus had human uses. It contains beings (angels) with freedom of choice and immutable substance, in a creation which is in other respects determined. Although these beings are out of time, their acts have a before and an after. Aevum, you might say, is the time-order of novels. Characters in novels are independent of time and succession, but may and usually do seem to operate in time and succession; the aevum co-exists with temporal events at the moment of occurrence, being, it was said, like a stick in a river. Brabant believed that Bergson inherited the notion through Spinoza's duratio, and if this is so there is an historical link between the aevum and Proust; furthermore this duree reelle is, I think, the real sense of modern 'spatial form, ' which is a figure for the aevum.

Frank Kermode
the-formerly-absolute-distinction-between-time-eternity-in-christian-thoughtbetween-nunc-movens-with-its-beginning-end-nunc-stans-perfect-possession-endless-lifeacquired-third-in
I used to read in books how our fathers persecuted mankind. But I never appreciated it. I did not really appreciate the infamies that have been committed in the name of religion, until I saw the iron arguments that Christians used. I saw the Thumbscrew-two little pieces of iron, armed on the inner surfaces with protuberances, to prevent their slipping; through each end a screw uniting the two pieces. And when some man denied the efficacy of baptism, or may be said, 'I do not believe that a fish ever swallowed a man to keep him from drowning, ' then they put his thumb between these pieces of iron and in the name of love and universal forgiveness, began to screw these pieces together. When this was done most men said, 'I will recant.' Probably I should have done the same. Probably I would have said: 'Stop; I will admit anything that you wish; I will admit that there is one god or a million, one hell or a billion; suit yourselves; but stop.' But there was now and then a man who would not swerve the breadth of a hair. There was now and then some sublime heart, willing to die for an intellectual conviction. Had it not been for such men, we would be savages to-night. Had it not been for a few brave, heroic souls in every age, we would have been cannibals, with pictures of wild beasts tattooed upon our flesh, dancing around some dried snake fetich. Let us thank every good and noble man who stood so grandly, so proudly, in spite of opposition, of hatred and death, for what he believed to be the truth. Heroism did not excite the respect of our fathers. The man who would not recant was not forgiven. They screwed the thumbscrews down to the last pang, and then threw their victim into some dungeon, where, in the throbbing silence and darkness, he might suffer the agonies of the fabled damned. This was done in the name of love-in the name of mercy, in the name of Christ. I saw, too, what they called the Collar of Torture. Imagine a circle of iron, and on the inside a hundred points almost as sharp as needles. This argument was fastened about the throat of the sufferer. Then he could not walk, nor sit down, nor stir without the neck being punctured, by these points. In a little while the throat would begin to swell, and suffocation would end the agonies of that man. This man, it may be, had committed the crime of saying, with tears upon his cheeks, 'I do not believe that God, the father of us all, will damn to eternal perdition any of the children of men.' I saw another instrument, called the Scavenger's Daughter. Think of a pair of shears with handles, not only where they now are, but at the points as well, and just above the pivot that unites the blades, a circle of iron. In the upper handles the hands would be placed; in the lower, the feet; and through the iron ring, at the centre, the head of the victim would be forced. In this condition, he would be thrown prone upon the earth, and the strain upon the muscles produced such agony that insanity would in pity end his pain. I saw the Rack. This was a box like the bed of a wagon, with a windlass at each end, with levers, and ratchets to prevent slipping; over each windlass went chains; some were fastened to the ankles of the sufferer; others to his wrists. And then priests, clergymen, divines, saints, began turning these windlasses, and kept turning, until the ankles, the knees, the hips, the shoulders, the elbows, the wrists of the victim were all dislocated, and the sufferer was wet with the sweat of agony. And they had standing by a physician to feel his pulse. What for? To save his life? Yes. In mercy? No; simply that they might rack him once again. This was done, remember, in the name of civilization; in the name of law and order; in the name of mercy; in the name of religion; in the name of Christ.

Robert G. Ingersoll
i-used-to-read-in-books-how-our-fathers-persecuted-mankind-but-i-never-appreciated-it-i-did-not-really-appreciate-infamies-that-have-been-committed-in-name-religion-until-i-saw-i
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