Hailed Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
surely-well-be-hailed-as-heroes
many-before-have-hailed-end-history-none-have-ever-been-right-jonathan-wilson
if-i-were-black-liberal-i-would-be-hailed-i-guess-but-im-not-i-mean-i-think-for-myself-i-want-to-make-my-own-decisions
if-crop-any-one-year-was-all-man-would-have-to-cut-his-throat-every-time-it-hailed-wendell-berry
you-see-artists-hailed-as-new-generation-independents-only-to-be-enlisted-to-leverage-product
there-is-no-great-invention-from-fire-to-flying-which-has-not-been-hailed-as-insult-to-some-god
there-is-hate-layer-opinion-emotion-in-america-there-will-be-other-mccarthys-to-come-who-will-be-hailed-as-its-heroes-max-lerner
unquestioning-obedience-is-hailed-as-great-virtue-only-by-those-leaders-whose-commands-are-highly-questionable-george-hammond
twins-are-usually-hailed-with-delight-because-they-swell-power-family-though-in-some-instances-they-are-put-to-death
when-news-broke-that-john-mccain-had-been-diagnosed-with-brain-cancer-outpouring-well-wishes-all-hailed-his-toughness
if-government-knew-how-i-should-like-to-see-it-check-not-multiply-population-when-it-reaches-its-true-law-action-every-man-that-is-born-will-be-ralph-waldo-emerson
and-it-came-to-pass-in-glorious-days-charts-that-music-hailed-we-danced-to-it-and-threw-party-but-in-our-hearts-we-knew-musicians-failed-tanya-stephens
never-in-my-life-had-i-been-more-frustrated-go-figure-it-wouldnt-be-with-human-but-freaking-alien-at-least-i-now-knew-that-male-species-were-asses-no-matter-what-planet-they-hail
a-little-soul-scarce-fledged-for-earth-takes-wing-with-heaven-again-for-goal-even-while-we-hailed-as-fresh-from-birth-a-little-soul-algernon-charles-swinburne
if-workers-struggle-for-higher-wages-this-is-hailed-as-social-gains-if-businessmen-struggle-for-higher-profits-this-is-damned-as-selfish-greed-ayn-rand
the-justice-department-ruled-that-native-american-tribes-are-allowed-to-grow-sell-marijuana-on-reservations-this-decision-was-hailed-as-victory-by-conan-obrien
What do you mean? What do you demand of your captain? Are you then so easily turned from your design? Did you not call this a glorious expedition? And wherefore was it glorious? Not because the way was smooth and placid as a southern sea, but because it was full of dangers and terror; because at every new incident your fortitude was to be called forth and your courage exhibited; because danger and death surrounded it, and these you were to brave and overcome. For this was it a glorious, for this was it an honourable undertaking. You were hereafter to be hailed as the benefactors of your species; your names adored as belonging to brave men who encountered death for honour and the benefit of mankind. And now, behold, with the first imagination of danger, or, if you will, the first mighty and terrific trial of your courage, you shrink away, and are content to be handed down as men who had not strength enough to endure cold and peril; and so, poor souls, they were chilly and returned to their warm firesides. Why that requires not this preparation; ye need not have come thus far, and dragged your captain to the shame of a defeat, merely to prove yourselves cowards. Oh! be men, or be more than men. Be steady to your purposes and firm as a rock. This ice is not made of such stuff as your hearts may be; it is mutable and cannot withstand you if you say that it shall not. Do not return to your families with the stigma of disgrace marked on your brows. Return as heroes who have fought and conquered, and who know not what it is to turn their backs on the foe.

Mary Shelley
what-do-you-mean-what-do-you-demand-your-captain-are-you-then-easily-turned-from-your-design-did-you-not-call-this-glorious-expedition-and-wherefore-was-it-glorious-not-because-w
It was while gliding through these latter waters that one serene and moonlight night, when all the waves rolled by like scrolls of silver; and, by their soft, suffusing seethings, made what seemed a silvery silence, not a solitude; on such a silent night a silvery jet was seen far in advance of the white bubbles at the bow. Lit up by the moon, it looked celestial; seemed some plumed and glittering god uprising from the sea. Fedallah first descried this jet. For of these moonlight nights, it was his wont to mount to the main-mast head, and stand a look-out there, with the same precision as if it had been day. And yet, though herds of whales were seen by night, not one whaleman in a hundred would venture a lowering for them. You may think with what emotions, then, the seamen beheld this old Oriental perched aloft at such unusual hours; his turban and the moon, companions in one sky. But when, after spending his uniform interval there for several successive nights without uttering a single sound; when, after all this silence, his unearthly voice was heard announcing that silvery, moon-lit jet, every reclining mariner started to his feet as if some winged spirit had lighted in the rigging, and hailed the mortal crew. 'There she blows!' Had the trump of judgment blown, they could not have quivered more; yet still they felt no terror; rather pleasure. For though it was a most unwonted hour, yet so impressive was the cry, and so deliriously exciting, that almost every soul on board instinctively desired a lowering.

Herman Melville
it-was-while-gliding-through-these-latter-waters-that-one-serene-moonlight-night-when-all-waves-rolled-by-like-scrolls-silver-by-their-soft-suffusing-seethings-made-what-seemed-s
Paine suffered then, as now he suffers not so much because of what he wrote as from the misinterpretations of others... He disbelieved the ancient myths and miracles taught by established creeds. But the attacks on those creeds - or on persons devoted to them - have served to darken his memory, casting a shadow across the closing years of his life. When Theodore Roosevelt termed Tom Paine a 'dirty little atheist' he surely spoke from lack of understanding. It was a stricture, an inaccurate charge of the sort that has dimmed the greatness of this eminent American. But the true measure of his stature will yet be appreciated. The torch which he handed on will not be extinguished. If Paine had ceased his writings with 'The Rights of Man' he would have been hailed today as one of the two or three outstanding figures of the Revolution. But 'The Age of Reason' cost him glory at the hands of his countrymen - a greater loss to them than to Tom Paine. I was always interested in Paine the inventor. He conceived and designed the iron bridge and the hollow candle; the principle of the modern central draught burner. The man had a sort of universal genius. He was interested in a diversity of things; but his special creed, his first thought, was liberty. Traducers have said that he spent his last days drinking in pothouses. They have pictured him as a wicked old man coming to a sorry end. But I am persuaded that Paine must have looked with magnanimity and sorrow on the attacks of his countrymen. That those attacks have continued down to our day, with scarcely any abatement, is an indication of how strong prejudice, when once aroused, may become. It has been a custom in some quarters to hold up Paine as an example of everything bad. The memory of Tom Paine will outlive all this. No man who helped to lay the foundations of our liberty - who stepped forth as the champion of so difficult a cause - can be permanently obscured by such attacks. Tom Paine should be read by his countrymen. I commend his fame to their hands. {The Philosophy of Paine, June 7, 1925}

Thomas A. Edison
paine-suffered-then-as-now-he-suffers-not-much-because-what-he-wrote-as-from-misinterpretations-others-he-disbelieved-ancient-myths-miracles-taught-by-established-creeds-but-atta
The car came opposite her, and she curtsied so low that recovery was impossible, and she sat down in the road. Her parasol flew out of her hand and out of her parasol flew the Union Jack. She saw a young man looking out of the window, dressed in khaki, grinning broadly, but not, so she thought, graciously, and it suddenly struck her that there was something, beside her own part in the affair, which was not as it should be. As he put his head in again there was loud laughter from the inside of the car. Mr. Wootten helped her up and the entire assembly of her friends crowded round her, hoping she was not hurt. "No, dear Major, dear Padre, not at all, thanks, " she said. "So stupid: my ankle turned. Oh, yes, the Union Jack I bought for my nephew, it's his birthday to-morrow. Thank you. I just came to see about my coke: of course I thought the Prince had arrived when you all went down to meet the 4.15. Fancy my running straight into it all! How well he looked." This was all rather lame, and Miss Mapp hailed Mrs. Poppit's appearance from the station as a welcome diversion... Mrs. Poppit was looking vexed. "I hope you saw him well, Mrs. Poppit, " said Miss Mapp, "after meeting two trains, and taking all that trouble." "Saw who?" said Mrs. Poppit with a deplorable lack both of manner and grammar. "Why"-light seemed to break on her odious countenance. "Why, you don't think that was the Prince, do you, Miss Mapp? He arrived here at one, so the station-master has just told me, and has been playing golf all afternoon." The Major looked at the Captain, and the Captain at the Major. It was months and months since they had missed their Saturday afternoon's golf. "It was the Prince of Wales who looked out of that car-window, " said Miss Mapp firmly. "Such a pleasant smile. I should know it anywhere." "The young man who got into the car at the station was no more the Prince of Wales than you are, " said Mrs. Poppit shrilly. "I was close to him as he came out: I curtsied to him before I saw." Miss Mapp instantly changed her attack: she could hardly hold her smile on to her face for rage. "How very awkward for you, " she said. "What a laugh they will all have over it this evening! Delicious!" Mrs. Poppit's face suddenly took on an expression of the tenderest solicitude. "I hope, Miss Mapp, you didn't jar yourself when you sat down in the road just now, " she said. "Not at all, thank you so much, " said Miss Mapp, hearing her heart beat in her throat...

E.F. Benson
the-car-came-opposite-her-she-curtsied-low-that-recovery-was-impossible-she-sat-down-in-road-her-parasol-flew-out-her-hand-out-her-parasol-flew-union-jack-she-saw-young-man-looki
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