Inference Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
the-dull-mind-once-arriving-at-inference-that-flatters-desire-is-rarely-able-to-retain-impression-that-notion-from-which-inference-started-was-purely-problematic-george-eliot
through-logic-inference-we-can-prove-anything-therefore-logic-inference-in-contrast-to-ordinary-daily-living-experience-are-secondary-instruments-edward-abbey
induction-is-process-inference-it-proceeds-from-known-to-unknown-john-stuart-mill
inductive-inference-is-only-process-known-to-us-by-which-essentially-new-knowledge-comes-into-world-ronald-fisher
shadwell-hated-all-southerners-by-inference-was-standing-at-north-pole-terry-pratchett
we-shall-say-that-we-have-acquaintance-with-anything-which-we-are-directly-aware-without-intermediary-any-process-inference-any-knowledge-truths-bertrand-russell
people-who-have-given-us-their-complete-confidence-believe-that-they-have-a-right-to-ours-the-inference-is-false-a-gift-confers-no-rights
to-all-those-who-have-drawn-inference-from-my-words-that-africa-as-continent-is-somehow-genetically-inferior-i-can-only-apologise-unreservedly
we-do-not-learn-by-inference-and-deduction-and-the-application-of-mathematics-to-philosophy-but-by-direct-intercourse-and-sympathy
we-can-scarcely-avoid-inference-that-light-consists-in-transverse-undulations-same-medium-which-is-cause-electric-magnetic-phenomena-james-clerk-maxwell
this-desire-knowledge-wonder-which-it-hopes-to-satisfy-are-driving-power-behind-all-changes-that-we-with-careless-questionbegging-inference-call-nicholas-murray-butler
evolution-is-inference-from-thousands-independent-sources-only-conceptual-structure-that-can-make-unified-sense-all-this-disparate-information-stephen-jay-gould
the-statistician-cannot-excuse-himself-from-duty-getting-his-head-clear-on-principles-scientific-inference-but-equally-no-other-thinking-man-can-ronald-fisher
any-approach-to-scientific-inference-which-seeks-to-legitimize-it-answer-in-reponse-to-complex-uncertainty-is-for-me-totalitarian-parody-wouldbe-adrian-smith
second-i-use-inference-from-technical-studies-theories-in-order-to-provide-practical-information-for-therapists-those-thoughts-are-several-steps-virgil-miller-newton
words-make-world-difference-over-time-they-become-charged-with-inference-allusion-deployed-effectively-they-have-power-to-change-fabric-our-civilisation
econometrics-may-be-defined-as-quantitative-analysis-actual-economic-phenomena-based-on-concurrent-development-theory-observation-related-by-paul-samuelson
the-ocean-is-last-frontier-human-empirical-knowledge-even-contours-on-that-eighth-graders-globe-are-product-mix-scientific-measurement-inference-conjecture
a-bill-of-rights-is-what-the-people-are-entitled-to-against-every-government-and-what-no-just-government-should-refuse-or-rest-on-inference
i-had-always-been-told-by-my-parents-not-implicitly-told-but-every-inference-was-that-britain-was-hub-universe
it-has-been-observed-that-ones-nose-is-never-happy-as-when-thrust-into-affairs-others-from-which-some-physiologists-have-drawn-inference-that-ambrose-bierce
it-has-been-observed-that-ones-nose-is-never-happy-as-when-it-is-thrust-into-affairs-another-from-which-some-physiologists-have-drawn-inference-that-nose-is-devoid-sense-smell-am
a-mere-inference-theory-must-give-way-to-truth-revealed-but-scientific-truth-must-be-maintained-however-contradictory-it-may-appear-to-most-david-brewster
in-some-small-field-each-child-should-attain-within-limited-range-its-experience-observation-power-to-draw-justly-limited-inference-from-observed-charles-william-eliot
In the history of philosophy, the term 'rationalism' has two distinct meanings. In one sense, it signifies an unbreached commitment to reasoned thought in contrast to any irrationalist rejection of the mind. In this sense, Aristotle and Ayn Rand are preeminent rationalists, opposed to any form of unreason, including faith. In a narrower sense, however, rationalism contrasts with empiricism as regards the false dichotomy between commitment to so-called 'pure' reason (i.e., reason detached from perceptual reality) and an exclusive reliance on sense experience (i.e., observation without inference therefrom). Rationalism, in this sense, is a commitment to reason construed as logical deduction from non-observational starting points, and a distrust of sense experience (e.g., the method of Descartes). Empiricism, according to this mistaken dichotomy, is a belief that sense experience provides factual knowledge, but any inference beyond observation is a mere manipulation of words or verbal symbols (e.g., the approach of Hume). Both Aristotle and Ayn Rand reject such a false dichotomy between reason and sense experience; neither are rationalists in this narrow sense. Theology is the purest expression of rationalism in the sense of proceeding by logical deduction from premises ungrounded in observable fact-deduction without reference to reality. The so-called 'thinking' involved here is purely formal, observationally baseless, devoid of facts, cut off from reality. Thomas Aquinas, for example, was history's foremost expert regarding the field of 'angelology.' No one could match his 'knowledge' of angels, and he devoted far more of his massive Summa Theologica to them than to physics.

Andrew Bernstein
in-history-philosophy-term-rationalism-has-two-distinct-meanings-in-one-sense-it-signifies-unbreached-commitment-to-reasoned-thought-in-contrast-to-any-irrationalist-rejection-mi
the-efficacy-psychedelics-with-regard-to-art-has-to-do-with-their-ability-to-render-language-weightless-as-fluid-ephemeral-as-those-famous-bubble-letters-sixties-psychedelics-i-t
These people look upon inequality as upon an evil. They do not assert that a definite degree of inequality which can be exactly determined by a judgment free of any arbitrariness and personal evaluation is good and has to be preserved unconditionally. They, on the contrary, declare inequality in itself as bad and merely contend that a lower degree of it is a lesser evil than a higher degree in the same sense in which a smaller quantity of poison in a man's body is a lesser evil than a larger dose. But if this is so, then there is logically in their doctrine no point at which the endeavors toward equalization would have to stop. Whether one has already reached a degree of inequality which is to be considered low enough and beyond which it is not necessary to embark upon further measures toward equalization is just a matter of personal judgments of value, quite arbitrary, different with different people and changing in the passing of time. As these champions of equalization appraise confiscation and 'redistribution' as a policy harming only a minority, viz., those whom they consider to be 'too' rich, and benefiting the rest-the majority-of the people, they cannot oppose any tenable argument to those who are asking for more of this allegedly beneficial policy. As long as any degree of inequality is left, there will always be people whom envy impels to press for a continuation of the equalization policy. Nothing can be advanced against their inference: If inequality of wealth and incomes is an evil, there is no reason to acquiesce in any degree of it, however low; equalization must not stop before it has completely leveled all individuals' wealth and incomes.

Ludwig von Mises
these-people-look-upon-inequality-as-upon-evil-they-do-not-assert-that-definite-degree-inequality-which-can-be-exactly-determined-by-judgment-free-any-arbitrariness-personal-eval
Language as a Prison The Philippines did have a written language before the Spanish colonists arrived, contrary to what many of those colonists subsequently claimed. However, it was a language that some theorists believe was mainly used as a mnemonic device for epic poems. There was simply no need for a European-style written language in a decentralized land of small seaside fishing villages that were largely self-sufficient. One theory regarding language is that it is primarily a useful tool born out of a need for control. In this theory written language was needed once top-down administration of small towns and villages came into being. Once there were bosses there arose a need for written language. The rise of the great metropolises of Ur and Babylon made a common written language an absolute necessity-but it was only a tool for the administrators. Administrators and rulers needed to keep records and know names- who had rented which plot of land, how many crops did they sell, how many fish did they catch, how many children do they have, how many water buffalo? More important, how much then do they owe me? In this account of the rise of written language, naming and accounting seem to be language's primary "civilizing" function. Language and number are also handy for keeping track of the movement of heavenly bodies, crop yields, and flood cycles. Naturally, a version of local oral languages was eventually translated into symbols as well, and nonadministrative words, the words of epic oral poets, sort of went along for the ride, according to this version. What's amazing to me is that if we accept this idea, then what may have begun as an instrument of social and economic control has now been internalized by us as a mark of being civilized. As if being controlled were, by inference, seen as a good thing, and to proudly wear the badge of this agent of control-to be able to read and write-makes us better, superior, more advanced. We have turned an object of our own oppression into something we now think of as virtuous. Perfect! We accept written language as something so essential to how we live and get along in the world that we feel and recognize its presence as an exclusively positive thing, a sign of enlightenment. We've come to love the chains that bind us, that control us, for we believe that they are us (161-2).

David Byrne
language-as-prison-the-philippines-did-have-written-language-before-spanish-colonists-arrived-contrary-to-what-many-those-colonists-subsequently-claimed-however-it-was-language-t
It might be useful here to say a word about Beckett, as a link between the two stages, and as illustrating the shift towards schism. He wrote for transition, an apocalyptic magazine (renovation out of decadence, a Joachite indication in the title), and has often shown a flair for apocalyptic variations, the funniest of which is the frustrated millennialism of the Lynch family in Watt, and the most telling, perhaps, the conclusion of Comment c'est. He is the perverse theologian of a world which has suffered a Fall, experienced an Incarnation which changes all relations of past, present, and future, but which will not be redeemed. Time is an endless transition from one condition of misery to another, 'a passion without form or stations, ' to be ended by no parousia. It is a world crying out for forms and stations, and for apocalypse; all it gets is vain temporality, mad, multiform antithetical influx. It would be wrong to think that the negatives of Beckett are a denial of the paradigm in favour of reality in all its poverty. In Proust, whom Beckett so admires, the order, the forms of the passion, all derive from the last book; they are positive. In Beckett, the signs of order and form are more or less continuously presented, but always with a sign of cancellation; they are resources not to be believed in, cheques which will bounce. Order, the Christian paradigm, he suggests, is no longer usable except as an irony; that is why the Rooneys collapse in laughter when they read on the Wayside Pulpit that the Lord will uphold all that fall. But of course it is this order, however ironized, this continuously transmitted idea of order, that makes Beckett's point, and provides his books with the structural and linguistic features which enable us to make sense of them. In his progress he has presumed upon our familiarity with his habits of language and structure to make the relation between the occulted forms and the narrative surface more and more tenuous; in Comment c'est he mimes a virtually schismatic breakdown of this relation, and of his language. This is perfectly possible to reach a point along this line where nothing whatever is communicated, but of course Beckett has not reached it by a long way; and whatever preserves intelligibility is what prevents schism. This is, I think, a point to be remembered whenever one considers extremely novel, avant-garde writing. Schism is meaningless without reference to some prior condition; the absolutely New is simply unintelligible, even as novelty. It may, of course, be asked: unintelligible to whom? -the inference being that a minority public, perhaps very small-members of a circle in a square world-do understand the terms in which the new thing speaks. And certainly the minority public is a recognized feature of modern literature, and certainly conditions are such that there may be many small minorities instead of one large one; and certainly this is in itself schismatic. The history of European literature, from the time the imagination's Latin first made an accommodation with the lingua franca, is in part the history of the education of a public-cultivated but not necessarily learned, as Auerbach says, made up of what he calls la cour et la ville. That this public should break up into specialized schools, and their language grow scholastic, would only be surprising if one thought that the existence of excellent mechanical means of communication implied excellent communications, and we know it does not, McLuhan's 'the medium is the message' notwithstanding. But it is still true that novelty of itself implies the existence of what is not novel, a past. The smaller the circle, and the more ambitious its schemes of renovation, the less useful, on the whole, its past will be. And the shorter. I will return to these points in a moment.

Frank Kermode
it-might-be-useful-here-to-say-word-about-beckett-as-link-between-two-stages-as-illustrating-shift-towards-schism-he-wrote-for-transition-apocalyptic-magazine-renovation-out-deca
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