Intensified Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
why-is-love-intensified-by-absence-audrey-niffenegger
comedy-becomes-intensified-in-short-scenes
jazz-music-is-intensified-feeling-nonchalance
and-i-am-quite-serious-when-i-say-that-i-do-not-believe-there-are-on-whole-earth-besides-many-intensified-bores-as-in-these-united-states-charles-dickens
nuclear-weapons-tv-have-simply-intensified-consequences-our-tendencies-david-foster-wallace
dont-let-day-go-by-without-handful-fun-for-only-those-well-be-memorable-even-intensified-through-time-amm-alusi
travel-is-intensified-living-one-last-great-sources-legal-adventure-rick-steves
globalization-far-from-putting-end-to-power-diplomacy-between-states-has-on-contrary-intensified-it
nuclear-weapons-tv-have-simply-intensified-consequences-our-tendencies-upped-stakes-david-foster-wallace
darwinism-did-not-strip-meaning-from-world-but-intensified-it-by-identifying-it-in-as-many-aspects-life-as-possible-neal-ascherson
experience-teaches-that-fire-mental-grief-is-intensified-by-being-confined-to-its-own-hearth-fr-james-groenings
beauty-pleasure-good-things-life-are-intensified-perhaps-only-exist-by-reason-contrast-walter-j-phillips
live-interaction-with-crowd-is-cathartic-spiritual-kind-exchange-its-intensified-at-festival-trent-reznor
i-was-pretty-good-soccer-player-but-it-just-wasnt-for-me-i-thrive-in-intensified-atmosphere-on-football-field-pat-mcafee
is-not-man-himself-most-unsettled-all-creatures-earth-what-is-this-trembling-sensation-that-is-intensified-with-each-ascending-step-in-natural-ugo-betti
i-have-always-thought-that-wild-animal-never-looks-well-as-when-some-obstacle-pronounced-durability-is-between-us-a-personal-experience-has-intensified-rather-than-diminished-tha
since-1970-relationships-can-be-more-volatile-jobs-more-ephemeral-geographical-mobility-more-intensified-stability-of-marriage-weaker
that-means-presenting-issues-in-certain-ways-that-will-appeal-to-those-people-then-becoming-prisoner-your-own-language-thought-process-that-has-always-happened-its-just-been-inte
the-current-global-landscape-is-quite-different-from-nottoodistant-past-the-process-globalization-has-intensified-world-is-moving-towards-new-michelle-bachelet
after-madrid-we-intensified-our-investigative-efforts-once-again-we-are-in-process-bringing-about-expansions-in-security-laws-creating-index-file-system
she-loosened-her-grip-on-his-hair-lightly-scraped-her-fingernails-over-his-cheek-to-his-incredible-lips-i-could-kiss-you-all-day-laiths-gaze-intensified-all-right-donna-grant
i-feel-like-my-joy-in-life-has-intensified-my-compassion-for-people-has-just-strengthened-i-have-compassion-that-i-wouldnt-have-had-before-lauren-scruggs
the-purpose-art-is-not-rarified-intellectual-distillate-it-is-life-intensified-brilliant-life-alain-ariasmisson
love-can-act-as-microscope-whatever-feelings-that-you-put-under-it-can-be-magnified-intensified-which-at-times-could-lead-you-into-selfpity-when-feelings-go-astray-miror_vegas
the-difference-between-casual-impression-intensified-image-is-about-as-great-as-that-separating-average-business-letter-from-poem-if-you-choose-your-subject-selectivelyintuitivel
the-great-depression-in-united-states-was-caused-i-wont-say-caused-was-enormously-intensified-made-far-worse-than-it-would-have-been-by-bad-milton-friedman
for-there-is-nothing-heavier-than-compassion-not-even-ones-own-pain-weighs-heavy-as-pain-one-feels-with-someone-for-someone-pain-intensified-by-imagination-prolonged-by-hundred-e
but-learningtime-is-always-long-secluded-time-loving-for-long-while-ahead-far-on-into-life-issolitude-intensified-deepened-loneness-for-him-who-rainer-maria-rilke
the-twoway-traffic-between-new-york-hollywood-has-been-fact-life-since-hollywood-was-invented-but-traffic-has-really-intensified-in-last-five-years-jed-bernstein
are-trials-starting-the-girl-claps-her-hands-over-her-mouth-im-sorry-she-whispers-i-its-all-right-i-dont-smile-at-her-it-will-only-scare-her-for-female-slave-smile-from-mask-is-n
A pale, slightly luminescent form materialized in front of us. Mason. He looked the same as ever-or did he? The usual sadness was there, but I could see something else, something else I couldn't quite put my finger on. Panic? Frustration? I could have almost sworn it was fear, but honestly, what would a ghost have to be afraid of. "What's wrong?" asked Dimitri. "Do you see him?" I whispered. Dimitri followed my gaze. "See who?" "Mason." Mason's troubled expression grew darker. I might not have been able to adequately identify it, but I knew it wasn't anything good. The nauseous feeling within me intensified, but somehow, I knew it had nothing to do with him. "Rose... we should go back... " said Dimitri carefully. He still wasn't on board with me seeing ghosts. But I didn't move. Mason's face was saying something else to me-or trying to. There was something here, something important that I needed to know. But he couldn't communicate it. "What?" I asked. "What is it?" A look of frustration crossed his face. He pointed off behind me, the dropped his hand. "Tell me, " I said, my frustration mirroring his. Dimitri was looking back and forth between me and Mason, though mason was probably only and empty space to him. I was too fixated on Mason to worry what Dimitri might think. There was something here. Something big. Mason opened his mouth, wanting to speak as in previous times but still unable to get the words out. Except, this time, after several agonizing seconds, he managed it. The words were nearly inaudible. "They're... coming...

Richelle Mead
a-pale-slightly-luminescent-form-materialized-in-front-us-mason-he-looked-same-as-ever-did-he-the-usual-sadness-was-there-but-i-could-see-something-else-something-else-i-couldnt-
By the second day, the song lyrics had faded, but in their place came darker irritations. Gradually, I started to become aware of a young man sitting just behind me and to the left. I had noticed him when he first entered the mediation hall, and had felt a flash of annoyance at the time: something about him, especially his beard, had struck me as too calculatedly dishevelled, as if he were trying to make a statement. Now his audible breathing was starting to irritate me, too. It seemed studied, unnatural, somehow theatrical. My irritation slowly intensified - a reaction that struck me as entirely reasonable and proportionate at the time. It was all beginning to feel like a personal attack. How much contempt must the bearded meditator have for me, I seethed silently, deliberately to decide to ruin the serenity of my meditation by behaving so obnoxiously? Experienced retreat-goers, it turns out, have a term for this phenomenon. The call it 'vipassana vendetta'. In the stillness tiny irritations become magnified into full-blown hate campaigns; the mind is so conditioned to attaching to storylines that it seizes upon whatever's available. Being on retreat had temporarily separated me from all the real causes of distress in my life, and so, apparently, I was inventing new ones. As I shuffled to my narrow bed that evening, I was still smarting about the loud-breathing man. I did let go of the vendetta eventually - but only because I'd fallen into an exhausted and dreamless sleep

Oliver Burkeman
by-second-day-song-lyrics-had-faded-but-in-their-place-came-darker-irritations-gradually-i-started-to-become-aware-young-man-sitting-just-behind-me-to-left-i-had-noticed-him-when
Eliot's own reflections on the primitive mind as a model for nondualistic thinking and on the nature and consequences of different modes of consciousness were informed by an excellent education in the social sciences and philosophy. As a prelude to our guided tour of the text of The Waste Land, we now turn to a brief survey of some of his intellectual preoccupations in the decade before he wrote it, preoccupations which in our view are enormously helpful in understanding the form of the poem. Eliot entered Harvard as a freshman in 1906 and finished his doctoral dissertation in 1916, with one of the academic years spent at the Sorbonne and one at Oxford. At Harvard and Oxford, he had as teachers some of modern philosophy's most distinguished individuals, including George Santayana, Josiah Royce, Bertrand Russell, and Harold Joachim; and while at the Sorbonne, he attended the lectures of Henri Bergson, a philosophic star in Paris in 1910-11. Under the supervision of Royce, Eliot wrote his dissertation on the epistemology of F. H. Bradley, a major voice in the late-nineteenth-, early-twentieth-century crisis in philosophy. Eliot extended this period of concentration on philosophical problems by devoting much of his time between 1915 and the early twenties to book reviewing. His education and early book reviewing occurred during the period of epistemological disorientation described in our first chapter, the period of "betweenness" described by Heidegger and Ortega y Gasset, the period of the revolt against dualism described by Lovejoy. 2 Eliot's personal awareness of the contemporary epistemological crisis was intensified by the fact that while he was writing his dissertation on Bradley he and his new wife were actually living with Bertrand Russell. Russell as the representative of neorealism and Bradley as the representative of neoidealism were perhaps the leading expositors of opposite responses to the crisis discussed in our first chapter. Eliot's situation was extraordinary. He was a close student of both Bradley and Russell; he had studied with Bradley's friend and disciple Harold Joachim and with Russell himself. And in 1915-16, while writing a dissertation explaining and in general defending Bradley against Russell, Eliot found himself face to face with Russell across the breakfast table. Moreover, as the husband of a fragile wife to whom both men (each in his own way) were devoted, Eliot must have found life to be a kaleidoscope of brilliant and fluctuating patterns.

Jewel Spears Brooker
eliots-own-reflections-on-primitive-mind-as-model-for-nondualistic-thinking-on-nature-consequences-different-modes-consciousness-were-informed-by-excellent-education-in-social-sc
The 1950s and 1960s: philosophy, psychology, myth There was considerable critical interest in Woolf 's life and work in this period, fuelled by the publication of selected extracts from her diaries, in A Writer's Diary (1953), and in part by J. K. Johnstone's The Bloomsbury Group (1954). The main critical impetus was to establish a sense of a unifying aesthetic mode in Woolf 's writing, and in her works as a whole, whether through philosophy, psychoanalysis, formal aesthetics, or mythopoeisis. James Hafley identified a cosmic philosophy in his detailed analysis of her fiction, The Glass Roof: Virginia Woolf as Novelist (1954), and offered a complex account of her symbolism. Woolf featured in the influential The English Novel: A Short Critical History (1954) by Walter Allen who, with antique chauvinism, describes the Woolfian 'moment' in terms of 'short, sharp female gasps of ecstasy, an impression intensified by Mrs Woolf 's use of the semi-colon where the comma is ordinarily enough'. Psychological and Freudian interpretations were also emerging at this time, such as Joseph Blotner's 1956 study of mythic patterns in To the Lighthouse, an essay that draws on Freud, Jung and the myth of Persephone.4 And there were studies of Bergsonian writing that made much of Woolf, such as Shiv Kumar's Bergson and the Stream of Consciousness Novel (1962). The most important work of this period was by the French critic Jean Guiguet. His Virginia Woolf and Her Works (1962); translated by Jean Stewart, 1965) was the first full-length study ofWoolf 's oeuvre, and it stood for a long time as the standard work of critical reference in Woolf studies. Guiguet draws on the existentialism of Jean-Paul Sartre to put forward a philosophical reading of Woolf; and he also introduces a psychobiographical dimension in the non-self.' This existentialist approach did not foreground Woolf 's feminism, either. his heavy use of extracts from A Writer's Diary. He lays great emphasis on subjectivism in Woolf 's writing, and draws attention to her interest in the subjective experience of 'the moment.' Despite his philosophical apparatus, Guiguet refuses to categorise Woolf in terms of any one school, and insists that Woolf has indeed 'no pretensions to abstract thought: her domain is life, not ideology'. Her avoidance of conventional character makes Woolf for him a 'purely psychological' writer.5 Guiguet set a trend against materialist and historicist readings ofWoolf by his insistence on the primacy of the subjective and the psychological: 'To exist, for Virginia Woolf, meant experiencing that dizziness on the ridge between two abysses of the unknown, the self and

Jane Goldman
the-1950s-1960s-philosophy-psychology-myth-there-was-considerable-critical-interest-in-woolf-s-life-work-in-this-period-fuelled-by-publication-selected-extracts-from-her-diaries-
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