Lear Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
i-am-what-i-am-as-writer-because-norman-lear-spike-lee-norman-lear-in-particular
you-have-to-get-through-hamlet-hoop-as-young-actor-your-classical-qualifications-are-based-on-quality-your-hamlet-and-then-as-older-actor-you-have-to-get-through-lear-hoop-and-im
he-hath-always-but-slightly-known-himself-king-lear-william-shakespeare
lear-yet-you-see-how-this-world-goes-glos-i-see-it-feelingly-william-shakespeare
shakespeare-wrote-all-there-is-that-we-need-to-know-about-dementia-in-king-lear
as-i-get-older-and-i-get-a-few-more-years-experience-i-become-more-like-dad-you-know-king-lear
i-feel-like-ive-been-on-eastenders-all-my-life-now-im-playing-king-lear-ian-holloway
i-liked-norman-lears-ideology-that-you-could-trust-audience-to-stay-with-you
to-paraphrase-oedipus-hamlet-lear-all-those-guys-i-wish-i-had-known-this-some-time-ago-roger-zelazny
i-think-shakespeare-got-drunk-after-he-finished-king-lear-that-he-had-ball-writing-it-louis-auchincloss
i-have-three-daughters-i-find-as-result-i-played-king-lear-almost-without-rehearsal-peter-ustinov
o-let-me-kiss-that-hand-king-lear-let-me-wipe-it-first-it-smells-mortality-william-shakespeare
i-have-no-desire-to-play-king-lear-hamlet-i-never-had-grand-ambition-i-just-followed-my-nose-liam-neeson
norman-lear-considers-almost-any-christian-who-speaks-up-for-acts-on-his-her-faith-to-be-dangerous-donald-wildmon
i-think-that-if-shakespeare-had-had-access-to-cgi-he-would-have-used-it-imagine-lear-conjuring-storm-lightning
the-actor-is-too-prone-to-exaggerate-his-powers-he-wants-to-play-hamlet-when-his-appearance-is-more-suitable-to-king-lear
i-think-i-have-finely-tuned-sense-humor-i-think-just-being-around-it-growing-up-in-it-my-dad-mel-brooks-norman-lear-these-are-people-i-grew-up-rob-reiner
thou-nature-art-my-goddess-to-thy-laws-my-services-are-bound-his-second-motto-from-king-lear-by-shakespeare-carl-friedrich-gauss
counterfeit-kings-is-king-lear-space-operas-science-fiction-has-fresh-new-nononsense-voice-his-name-is-adam-connell-stevenelliot-altman
there-isnt-king-lear-for-women-henry-v-richard-iii-you-reach-level-where-you-can-handle-that-stuff-technically-mentally-its-not-there-helen-mirren
ive-been-lucky-to-get-some-pathbreaking-films-which-proved-to-be-turning-point-in-my-career-be-it-rock-on-the-last-lear-raajneeti-directors-started-arjun-rampal
king-lear-alone-among-these-plays-has-distinct-double-action-besides-this-it-is-impossible-i-think-from-point-view-construction-to-regard-hero-as-leading-figure
complaining-about-boring-football-is-little-like-complaining-about-sad-ending-king-lear-it-misses-point-somehow-nick-hornby
when-i-was-growing-up-my-favorite-show-was-the-mary-tyler-moore-show-i-loved-all-stuff-that-norman-lear-did-ryan-murphy
ive-made-dogs-breakfast-english-history-geography-king-lear-english-language-in-general
when-youre-playing-king-lear-you-have-to-have-little-humour-you-will-have-no-tragedy-when-king-dies
shakespeare-without-othello-lear-macbeth-and-hamlet-would-be-all-too-much-like-hamlet-without-the-prince
its-kind-ultimate-dysfunctional-family-lear-wants-to-be-told-his-daughters-love-him-when-he-doesnt-get-it-he-flips-out-starts-making-series-bad-decisions-thats-what-gets-whole-ba
when-i-closed-in-king-lear-i-went-into-period-depression-for-about-three-weeks-every-actor-ive-talked-to-whos-ever-played-major-major-shakespeare-frank-langella
grant-me-old-mans-frenzy-myself-must-i-remake-till-i-am-timon-lear-or-that-william-blake-who-beat-upon-wall-till-truth-obeyed-his-call-william-butler-yeats
the-good-parts-are-people-who-dont-make-do-theyre-interesting-people-lear-doesnt-make-do
i-didnt-grow-up-in-norman-rockwell-house-my-house-was-more-akin-to-norman-lear-michael-p-naughton
Most of us are pseudo-scholars... for we are a very large and quite a powerful class, eminent in Church and State, we control the education of the Empire, we lend to the Press such distinction as it consents to receive, and we are a welcome asset at dinner-parties. Pseudo-scholarship is, on its good side, the homage paid by ignorance to learning. It also has an economic side, on which we need not be hard. Most of us must get a job before thirty, or sponge on our relatives, and many jobs can only be got by passing an exam. The pseudo-scholar often does well in examination (real scholars are not much good), and even when he fails he appreciates their inner majesty. They are gateways to employment, they have power to ban and bless. A paper on King Lear may lead somewhere, unlike the rather far-fetched play of the same name. It may be a stepping-stone to the Local Government Board. He does not often put it to himself openly and say, "That's the use of knowing things, they help you to get on." The economic pressure he feels is more often subconscious, and he goes to his exam, merely feeling that a paper on King Lear is a very tempestuous and terrible experience but an intensely real one... As long as learning is connected with earning, as long as certain jobs can only be reached through exams, so long must we take the examination system seriously. If another ladder to employment were contrived, much so-called education would disappear, and no one be a penny the stupider.

E.M. Forster
most-us-are-pseudoscholars-for-we-are-large-quite-powerful-class-eminent-in-church-state-we-control-education-empire-we-lend-to-press-such-distinction-as-it-consents-to-receive-w
there-may-even-be-real-relation-between-certain-kinds-effectiveness-in-literature-totalitarianism-in-politics-but-although-fictions-are-alike-ways-finding-out-about-human-world-a
Shakespeare's plays do not present easy solutions. The audience has to decide for itself. King Lear is perhaps the most disturbing in this respect. One of the key words of the whole play is 'Nothing'. When King Lear's daughter Cordelia announces that she can say 'Nothing' about her love for her father, the ties of family love fall apart, taking the king from the height of power to the limits of endurance, reduced to 'nothing' but 'a poor bare forked animal'. Here, instead of 'readiness' to accept any challenge, the young Edgar says 'Ripeness is all'. This is a maturity that comes of learning from experience. But, just as the audience begins to see hope in a desperate and violent situation, it learns that things can always get worse: Who is't can say 'I am at the worst?' ... The worst is not So long as we can say 'This is the worst.' Shakespeare is exploring and redefining the geography of the human soul, taking his characters and his audience further than any other writer into the depths of human behaviour. The range of his plays covers all the 'form and pressure' of mankind in the modern world. They move from politics to family, from social to personal, from public to private. He imposed no fixed moral, no unalterable code of behaviour. That would come to English society many years after Shakespeare's death, and after the tragic hypothesis of Hamlet was fulfilled in 1649, when the people killed the King and replaced his rule with the Commonwealth. Some critics argue that Shakespeare supported the monarchy and set himself against any revolutionary tendencies. Certainly he is on the side of order and harmony, and his writing reflects a monarchic context rather than the more republican context which replaced the monarchy after 1649. It would be fanciful to see Shakespeare as foretelling the decline of the Stuart monarchy. He was not a political commentator. Rather, he was a psychologically acute observer of humanity who had a unique ability to portray his observations, explorations, and insights in dramatic form, in the richest and most exciting language ever used in the English theatre.

Ronald Carter
shakespeares-plays-do-not-present-easy-solutions-the-audience-has-to-decide-for-itself-king-lear-is-perhaps-most-disturbing-in-this-respect-one-key-words-whole-play-is-nothing-wh
i-do-not-think-there-is-demonstrative-proof-like-euclid-christianity-nor-existence-matter-nor-good-will-honesty-my-best-oldest-friends-i-think-all-three-are-except-perhaps-second
We read the pagan sacred books with profit and delight. With myth and fable we are ever charmed, and find a pleasure in the endless repetition of the beautiful, poetic, and absurd. We find, in all these records of the past, philosophies and dreams, and efforts stained with tears, of great and tender souls who tried to pierce the mystery of life and death, to answer the eternal questions of the Whence and Whither, and vainly sought to make, with bits of shattered glass, a mirror that would, in very truth, reflect the face and form of Nature's perfect self. These myths were born of hopes, and fears, and tears, and smiles, and they were touched and colored by all there is of joy and grief between the rosy dawn of birth, and death's sad night. They clothed even the stars with passion, and gave to gods the faults and frailties of the sons of men. In them, the winds and waves were music, and all the lakes, and streams, and springs, -the mountains, woods and perfumed dells were haunted by a thousand fairy forms. They thrilled the veins of Spring with tremulous desire; made tawny Summer's billowed breast the throne and home of love; filled Autumns arms with sun-kissed grapes, and gathered sheaves; and pictured Winter as a weak old king who felt, like Lear upon his withered face, Cordelia's tears. These myths, though false, are beautiful, and have for many ages and in countless ways, enriched the heart and kindled thought. But if the world were taught that all these things are true and all inspired of God, and that eternal punishment will be the lot of him who dares deny or doubt, the sweetest myth of all the Fable World would lose its beauty, and become a scorned and hateful thing to every brave and thoughtful man.

Robert G. Ingersoll
we-read-pagan-sacred-books-with-profit-delight-with-myth-fable-we-are-ever-charmed-find-pleasure-in-endless-repetition-beautiful-poetic-absurd-we-find-in-all-these-records-past-p
What, then, can Shakespearean tragedy, on this brief view, tell us about human time in an eternal world? It offers imagery of crisis, of futures equivocally offered, by prediction and by action, as actualities; as a confrontation of human time with other orders, and the disastrous attempt to impose limited designs upon the time of the world. What emerges from Hamlet is-after much futile, illusory action-the need of patience and readiness. The 'bloody period' of Othello is the end of a life ruined by unseasonable curiosity. The millennial ending of Macbeth, the broken apocalypse of Lear, are false endings, human periods in an eternal world. They are researches into death in an age too late for apocalypse, too critical for prophecy; an age more aware that its fictions are themselves models of the human design on the world. But it was still an age which felt the human need for ends consonant with the past, the kind of end Othello tries to achieve by his final speech; complete, concordant. As usual, Shakespeare allows him his tock; but he will not pretend that the clock does not go forward. The human perpetuity which Spenser set against our imagery of the end is represented here also by the kingly announcements of Malcolm, the election of Fortinbras, the bleak resolution of Edgar. In apocalypse there are two orders of time, and the earthly runs to a stop; the cry of woe to the inhabitants of the earth means the end of their time; henceforth 'time shall be no more.' In tragedy the cry of woe does not end succession; the great crises and ends of human life do not stop time. And if we want them to serve our needs as we stand in the middest we must give them patterns, understood relations as Macbeth calls them, that defy time. The concords of past, present, and future towards which the soul extends itself are out of time, and belong to the duration which was invented for angels when it seemed difficult to deny that the world in which men suffer their ends is dissonant in being eternal. To close that great gap we use fictions of complementarity. They may now be novels or philosophical poems, as they once were tragedies, and before that, angels. What the gap looked like in more modern times, and how more modern men have closed it, is the preoccupation of the second half of this series.

Frank Kermode
what-then-can-shakespearean-tragedy-on-this-brief-view-tell-us-about-human-time-in-eternal-world-it-offers-imagery-crisis-futures-equivocally-offered-by-prediction-by-action-as-a
When he was in college, a famous poet made a useful distinction for him. He had drunk enough in the poet's company to be compelled to describe to him a poem he was thinking of. It would be a monologue of sorts, the self-contemplation of a student on a summer afternoon who is reading Euphues. The poem itself would be a subtle series of euphuisms, translating the heat, the day, the student's concerns, into symmetrical posies; translating even his contempt and boredom with that famously foolish book into a euphuism. The poet nodded his big head in a sympathetic, rhythmic way as this was explained to him, then told him that there are two kinds of poems. There is the kind you write; there is the kind you talk about in bars. Both kinds have value and both are poems; but it's fatal to confuse them. In the Seventh Saint, many years later, it had struck him that the difference between himself and Shakespeare wasn't talent - not especially - but nerve. The capacity not to be frightened by his largest and most potent conceptions, to simply (simply!) sit down and execute them. The dreadful lassitude he felt when something really large and multifarious came suddenly clear to him, something Lear-sized yet sonnet-precise. If only they didn't rush on him whole, all at once, massive and perfect, leaving him frightened and nerveless at the prospect of articulating them word by scene by page. He would try to believe they were of the kind told in bars, not the kind to be written, though there was no way to be sure of this except to attempt the writing; he would raise a finger (the novelist in the bar mirror raising the obverse finger) and push forward his change. Wailing like a neglected ghost, the vast notion would beat its wings into the void. Sometimes it would pursue him for days and years as he fled desperately. Sometimes he would turn to face it, and do battle. Once, twice, he had been victorious, objectively at least. Out of an immense concatenation of feeling, thought, word, transcendent meaning had come his first novel, a slim, pageant of a book, tombstone for his slain conception. A publisher had taken it, gingerly; had slipped it quietly into the deep pool of spring releases, where it sank without a ripple, and where he supposes it lies still, its calm Bodoni gone long since green. A second, just as slim but more lurid, nightmarish even, about imaginary murders in an imaginary exotic locale, had been sold for a movie, though the movie had never been made. He felt guilt for the producer's failure (which perhaps the producer didn't feel), having known the book could not be filmed; he had made a large sum, enough to finance years of this kind of thing, on a book whose first printing was largely returned.

John Crowley
when-he-was-in-college-famous-poet-made-useful-distinction-for-him-he-had-drunk-enough-in-poets-company-to-be-compelled-to-describe-to-him-poem-he-was-thinking-it-would-be-monolo
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