Macabre Quotes

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it-doesnt-seem-to-me-strange-that-children-should-like-macabre-sensational-forbidden
it-doesnt-seem-to-me-strange-that-children-should-like-macabre-sensational-forbidden-anthony-hecht
you-walk-fine-line-between-beautifully-macabre-uncharacteristically-psychotic-solange-nicole
gracious-dying-is-huge-macabre-expensive-joke-on-american-public
im-really-big-fan-all-things-macabre-in-general-halloween-happens-to-be-my-favorite-holiday
temptation-said-that-we-all-dream-committing-crimes-but-that-only-unbalanced-make-that-macabre-idea-reality-paulo-coelho
rising-from-dead-glowing-at-sunrise-what-did-that-make-him-god-cheerful-mornings-macabre-surprises-nk-jemisin
every-generation-has-macabre-notion-that-wars-government-prohibition-natural-disasters-mankind-itself-could-be-downfall-society-world-as-whole
i-almost-moved-into-place-over-funeral-parlor-my-father-said-thats-just-too-macabre-but-i-thought-id-be-embracing-my-mortality-i-told-him-it-would-keep-me-grounded-like-when-peop
people-are-always-trying-to-be-on-top-and-not-always-with-macabre-agenda-but-i-think-that-people-are-desperately-trying-to-remain-in-control-rather-than-being-honest
despite-their-macabre-imaginations-they-dont-believe-things-they-say-all-those-things-about-magic-fantemes-but-i-do-i-know-he-lingers-ive-heard-his-voice-soft-as-lovers-whisper-s
rafael-possessed-unfathomable-strength-his-speed-defied-laws-nature-his-bite-good-god-his-bite-how-could-something-macabre-feel-pleasurable-brooklyn-ann
mean-infectious-the-evil-prophets-rise-dance-macabre-as-witches-streak-sky-decadent-worship-black-magic-sorcery-in-womb-devils-dungeon-megadeth
ray-bradburys-connections-to-fantasy-space-cinema-to-macabre-melancholy-were-all-born-his-years-spent-running-jumping-galloping-through-woods-across-fields-down-brick-paved-stree
for-two-years-she-cassie-had-been-inseparable-and-then-one-night-cassie-had-disappeared-from-her-bed-in-her-place-her-abductor-had-left-his-calling-card-macabre-nursery-rhyme-cas
compassion-for-human-hurt-humble-sense-our-impermanence-absolute-valuation-justiceall-our-called-virtues-only-trouble-us-serve-to-bolster-not-assuage-horror-in-addition-these-qua
Four times during the first six days they were assembled and briefed and then sent back. Once, they took off and were flying in formation when the control tower summoned them down. The more it rained, the worse they suffered. The worse they suffered, the more they prayed that it would continue raining. All through the night, men looked at the sky and were saddened by the stars. All through the day, they looked at the bomb line on the big, wobbling easel map of Italy that blew over in the wind and was dragged in under the awning of the intelligence tent every time the rain began. The bomb line was a scarlet band of narrow satin ribbon that delineated the forward most position of the Allied ground forces in every sector of the Italian mainland. For hours they stared relentlessly at the scarlet ribbon on the map and hated it because it would not move up high enough to encompass the city. When night fell, they congregated in the darkness with flashlights, continuing their macabre vigil at the bomb line in brooding entreaty as though hoping to move the ribbon up by the collective weight of their sullen prayers. "I really can't believe it, " Clevinger exclaimed to Yossarian in a voice rising and falling in protest and wonder. "It's a complete reversion to primitive superstition. They're confusing cause and effect. It makes as much sense as knocking on wood or crossing your fingers. They really believe that we wouldn't have to fly that mission tomorrow if someone would only tiptoe up to the map in the middle of the night and move the bomb line over Bologna. Can you imagine? You and I must be the only rational ones left." In the middle of the night Yossarian knocked on wood, crossed his fingers, and tiptoed out of his tent to move the bomb line up over Bologna.

Joseph Heller
four-times-during-first-six-days-they-were-assembled-briefed-then-sent-back-once-they-took-off-were-flying-in-formation-when-control-tower-summoned-them-down-the-more-it-rained-w
There is a degree of emotional impact in the nature poetry of the eighteenth century which marks a shift in sensibility towards what came to be called 'the sublime'. The concept, from classical Greek, came to England through the French of Boileau, and reached its definitive explication in Edmund Burke's Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful (1757-59). This is a key text of the times, displaying an emphasis on feelings and on imagination, which is almost the antithesis of the neoclassical insistence on form and reason. Burke's idea of the sublime goes beyond natural beauty (although the beauty of nature is very much a part of it) and goes into the realms of awe, or 'terror'. The sublime is, for Burke, 'productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling'. Terror, emotion, feeling: all these represent a break from the intellectual rigours of the Augustan age, and are in one sense a reaction against the new pressures of society and bourgeois concerns... The link between the sublime and terror is most clearly seen in the imaginative exaggeration of the Gothic novel - a form which concentrated on the fantastic, the macabre and the supernatural, with haunted castles, spectres from the grave and wild landscapes. It is significant that the term 'Gothic' originally had mediaeval connotations: this is the first of several ways of returning to pre-Renaissance themes and values which is to be found over the next hundred years or so. The novels of the 1760s to the 1790s, however, gave the term 'Gothic' the generic meaning of horror fantasy. The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole (son of the prime minister Sir Robert Walpole) was the first of this kind, and the sub-genre has flourished ever since... .. Like many texts of its times, Walpole's novel purported to be a translation of an ancient manuscript dating from the eleventh or twelfth century. There was a strange fashion for these mediaeval rediscoveries, Thomas Chatterton and James Macpherson (Ossian) being notable contributors to the trend. Whether this was a deliberate avoidance of boastful originality or an attempt to give the works involved some spurious historical validity is not clear. Peter Ackroyd's novel Chatterton (1987) examines the phenomenon.

Ronald Carter
there-is-degree-emotional-impact-in-nature-poetry-eighteenth-century-which-marks-shift-in-sensibility-towards-what-came-to-be-called-sublime-the-concept-from-classical-greek-came
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