Nibbled Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
dealing-with-network-executives-is-like-being-nibbled-to-death-by-ducks
the-true-danger-is-when-liberty-is-nibbled-away-for-expedience-by-parts-edmund-burke
i-am-frayed-nibbled-survivor-in-fallen-world-i-am-getting-along-i-am-aging-eaten-have-done-my-share-eating-too-annie-dillard
are-you-calling-me-your-gift-yes-she-smiled-how-do-you-feel-about-that-like-its-my-turn-to-be-unwrapped-he-nibbled-at-her-mouth-do-it-slow-nalini-singh
god-think-great-men-that-have-nibbled-on-me-now-im-nothing-but-snack-for-virus-something-that-cant-even-decide-if-its-plant-animal-robert-patrick
i-guess-that-as-life-is-speeded-up-our-capacity-for-concentration-is-being-nibbled-away-at-by-all-obvious-things-that-leads-us-actually-to-be-more-geoff-dyer
the-november-evening-had-bite-it-nibbled-notquitegently-at-her-cheeks-ears-in-virginia-late-autumn-was-lover-still-but-dangerous-one-j-aleksandr-wootton
it-follows-that-they-never-understood-reginald-who-came-down-late-to-breakfast-nibbled-toast-said-disrespectful-things-about-universe-the-family-ate-porridge-believed-in-everythi
where-lambs-have-nibbled-silent-moves-feet-angels-bright-unseen-they-pour-blessing-joy-without-ceasing-on-each-bud-blossom-each-sleeping-bosom-william-blake
i-dont-mind-getting-smacked-on-chin-i-just-dont-want-to-get-nibbled-to-death-theres-difference-john-steinbeck
he-built-small-house-called-cocoon-around-himself-he-stayed-inside-for-more-than-two-weeks-then-he-nibbled-hole-in-cocoon-pushed-his-way-out-he-eric-carle
why-you-boggleeyed-flaptongued-dragbellied-offspring-unmentionable-algae-you-seething-little-leprous-blotch-batnibbled-fungus-you-cringing-parasite-on-underside-dwarfish-ignoble-
i-nibbled-my-lower-lip-if-you-could-see-into-my-past-just-by-touching-my-back-youd-have-hard-time-resisting-temptation-too-i-have-hard-time-keeping-my-hands-off-you-without-that-
The fact is,' said Van Gogh, 'the fact is that we are painters in real life, and the important thing is to breathe as hard as ever we can breathe.' So I breathe. I breathe at the open window above my desk, and a moist fragrance assails me from the gnawed leaves of the growing mock orange. This air is as intricate as the light that filters through forested mountain ridges and into my kitchen window; this sweet air is the breath of leafy lungs more rotted than mine; it has sifted through the serrations of many teeth. I have to love these tatters. And I must confess that the thought of this old yard breathing alone in the dark turns my mind to something else. I cannot in all honesty call the world old when I've seen it new. On the other hand, neither will honesty permit me suddenly to invoke certain experiences of newness and beauty as binding, sweeping away all knowledge. But I am thinking now of the tree with the lights in it, the cedar in the yard by the creek I saw transfigured. That the world is old and frayed is no surprise; that the world could ever become new and whole beyond uncertainty was, and is, such a surprise that I find myself referring all subsequent kinds of knowledge to it. And it suddenly occurs to me to wonder: were the twigs of the cedar I saw really bloated with galls? They probably were; they almost surely were. I have seen these 'cedar apples' swell from that cedar's green before and since: reddish gray, rank, malignant. All right then. But knowledge does not vanquish mystery, or obscure its distant lights. I still now and will tomorrow steer by what happened that day, when some undeniably new spirit roared down the air, bowled me over, and turned on the lights. I stood on grass like air, air like lightning coursed in my blood, floated my bones, swam in my teeth. I've been there, seen it, been done by it. I know what happened to the cedar tree, I saw the cells in the cedar tree pulse charged like wings beating praise. Now, it would be too facile to pull everything out of the hat and say that mystery vanquishes knowledge. Although my vision of the world of the spirit would not be altered a jot if the cedar had been purulent with galls, those galls actually do matter to my understanding of this world. Can I say then that corruption is one of beauty's deep-blue speckles, that the frayed and nibbled fringe of the world is a tallith, a prayer shawl, the intricate garment of beauty? It is very tempting, but I cannot. But I can, however, affirm that corruption is not beauty's very heart and I can I think call the vision of the cedar and the knowledge of these wormy quarryings twin fjords cutting into the granite cliffs of mystery and say the new is always present simultaneously with the old, however hidden. The tree with the lights in it does not go out; that light still shines on an old world, now feebly, now bright. I am a frayed and nibbled survivor in a fallen world, and I am getting along. I am aging and eaten and have done my share of eating too. I am not washed and beautiful, in control of a shining world in which everything fits, but instead am wandering awed about on a splintered wreck I've come to care for, whose gnawed trees breathe a delicate air, whose bloodied and scarred creatures are my dearest companions, and whose beauty beats and shines not in its imperfections but overwhelmingly in spite of them, under the wind-rent clouds, upstream and down.

Annie Dillard
the-fact-is-said-van-gogh-fact-is-that-we-are-painters-in-real-life-important-thing-is-to-breathe-as-hard-as-ever-we-can-breathe-so-i-breathe-i-breathe-at-open-window-above-my-de
?Earn cash when you save a quote by clicking
EARNED Load...
LEVEL : Load...