Preoccupations Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
dublin-was-hardly-worried-by-war-her-old-preoccupations-were-still-preoccupations-the-intelligentsia-continued-their-parties-their-mutual-malice-was-as-effervescent-as-ever
one-my-major-preoccupations-is-approximation-between-what-i-say-what-i-do-between-what-i-seem-to-be-what-i-am-actually-becoming-paulo-freire
theyve-got-organizations-for-people-like-me-with-stupid-preoccupations-vic-chesnutt
europe-has-to-address-peoples-needs-directly-reflect-their-priorities-not-our-own-preoccupations
notions-chance-fate-are-preoccupations-men-engaged-in-rash-undertakings-cormac-mccarthy
preservation-past-has-been-one-humankinds-chief-preoccupations-for-centuries-although-i-am-not-convinced-much-it-is-worth-preserving-chris-flynn
over-time-parents-have-barnacled-most-routine-activities-in-infancy-with-their-own-preoccupations-its-sometimes-hard-to-see-baby-for-all-barnacles-nicholas-day
the-passionate-controversies-of-one-era-are-viewed-as-sterile-preoccupations-by-another-for-knowledge-alters-what-we-seek-as-well-as-what-we-find
he-realised-more-vividly-than-ever-before-that-art-had-two-constant-two-unending-preoccupations-it-is-always-meditating-upon-death-it-is-always-thereby-creating-life-boris-paster
i-worry-lot-about-taking-care-my-dependents-all-those-perfectly-ordinary-middleclass-preoccupations-orson-welles
thus-worshiping-serving-studying-praying-each-in-its-own-way-squeezes-selfishness-out-us-pushes-aside-our-preoccupations-with-things-world-neal-a-maxwell
every-serious-novel-is-beyond-its-immediate-thematic-preoccupations-discussion-craft-conquest-form-conflict-with-its-difficulties-pursuit-its-felicities-beauty-ralph-ellison
in-way-fasting-is-like-calming-monkey-mind-effected-by-rosary-prayer-both-are-means-stilling-effervescence-relatively-superficial-robert-barron
you-want-novel-to-tap-as-directly-as-possible-into-your-most-unspeakable-preoccupations-and-in-america-in-particular-cricket-is-pretty-unspeakable
im-simply-saying-that-our-deepest-thoughts-desires-preoccupations-manifest-themselves-in-art-whether-we-intend-them-to-not-thats-what-art-is-for-its-not-cerebral-its-emotional-si
i-found-growing-up-that-love-sexuality-was-wonderful-way-to-understand-existence-when-we-love-it-takes-us-beyond-ourselves-otherwise-were-just-frederick-lenz
i-have-patches-insomnia-im-fascinated-by-otherness-world-at-night-the-stillness-daytime-preoccupations-fall-away-standards-change-thoughts-change-its-canvas-for-reinvention-i-thi
man-literally-drives-himself-into-blind-obliviousness-with-social-games-psychological-tricks-personal-preoccupations-far-removed-from-reality-his-situation-that-they-are-forms-ma
idle-people-are-often-bored-bored-people-unless-they-sleep-lot-are-cruel-it-is-not-accident-that-boredom-cruelty-are-great-preoccupations-in-our-renata-adler
Marx was troubled by the question of why ancient Greek art retained an 'eternal charm', even though the social conditions which produced it had long passed; but how do we know that it will remain 'eternally' charming, since history has not yet ended? Let us imagine that by dint of some deft archaeological research we discovered a great deal more about what ancient Greek tragedy actually meant to its original audiences, recognized that these concerns were utterly remote from our own, and began to read the plays again in the light of this deepened knowledge. One result might be that we stopped enjoying them. We might come to see that we had enjoyed them previously because we were unwittingly reading them in the light of our own preoccupations; once this became less possible, the drama might cease to speak at all significantly to us. The fact that we always interpret literary works to some extent in the light of our own concerns - indeed that in one sense of 'our own concerns' we are incapable of doing anything else - might be one reason why certain works of literature seem to retain their value across the centuries. It may be, of course, that we still share many preoccupations with the work itself; but it may also be that people have not actually been valuing the 'same' work at all, even though they may think they have. 'Our' Homer is not identical with the Homer of the Middle Ages, nor 'our' Shakespeare with that of his contemporaries; it is rather that different historical periods have constructed a 'different' Homer and Shakespeare for their own purposes, and found in these texts elements to value or devalue, though not necessarily the same ones. All literary works, in other words, are 'rewritten', if only unconsciously, by the societies which read them; indeed there is no reading of a work which is not also a 're-writing'. No work, and no current evaluation of it, can simply be extended to new groups of people without being changed, perhaps almost unrecognizably, in the process; and this is one reason why what counts as literature is a notably unstable affair.

Terry Eagleton
marx-was-troubled-by-question-why-ancient-greek-art-retained-eternal-charm-even-though-social-conditions-which-produced-it-had-long-passed-but-how-do-we-know-that-it-will-remain-
Eliot's own reflections on the primitive mind as a model for nondualistic thinking and on the nature and consequences of different modes of consciousness were informed by an excellent education in the social sciences and philosophy. As a prelude to our guided tour of the text of The Waste Land, we now turn to a brief survey of some of his intellectual preoccupations in the decade before he wrote it, preoccupations which in our view are enormously helpful in understanding the form of the poem. Eliot entered Harvard as a freshman in 1906 and finished his doctoral dissertation in 1916, with one of the academic years spent at the Sorbonne and one at Oxford. At Harvard and Oxford, he had as teachers some of modern philosophy's most distinguished individuals, including George Santayana, Josiah Royce, Bertrand Russell, and Harold Joachim; and while at the Sorbonne, he attended the lectures of Henri Bergson, a philosophic star in Paris in 1910-11. Under the supervision of Royce, Eliot wrote his dissertation on the epistemology of F. H. Bradley, a major voice in the late-nineteenth-, early-twentieth-century crisis in philosophy. Eliot extended this period of concentration on philosophical problems by devoting much of his time between 1915 and the early twenties to book reviewing. His education and early book reviewing occurred during the period of epistemological disorientation described in our first chapter, the period of "betweenness" described by Heidegger and Ortega y Gasset, the period of the revolt against dualism described by Lovejoy. 2 Eliot's personal awareness of the contemporary epistemological crisis was intensified by the fact that while he was writing his dissertation on Bradley he and his new wife were actually living with Bertrand Russell. Russell as the representative of neorealism and Bradley as the representative of neoidealism were perhaps the leading expositors of opposite responses to the crisis discussed in our first chapter. Eliot's situation was extraordinary. He was a close student of both Bradley and Russell; he had studied with Bradley's friend and disciple Harold Joachim and with Russell himself. And in 1915-16, while writing a dissertation explaining and in general defending Bradley against Russell, Eliot found himself face to face with Russell across the breakfast table. Moreover, as the husband of a fragile wife to whom both men (each in his own way) were devoted, Eliot must have found life to be a kaleidoscope of brilliant and fluctuating patterns.

Jewel Spears Brooker
eliots-own-reflections-on-primitive-mind-as-model-for-nondualistic-thinking-on-nature-consequences-different-modes-consciousness-were-informed-by-excellent-education-in-social-sc
the-bloomsbury-group-has-been-characterised-as-liberal-pacifist-at-times-libertine-intellectual-enclave-cambridgebased-privilege-the-cambridge-men-group-bell-forster-fry-keynes-s
And no matter how much the gray people in power despise knowledge, they can't do anything about historical objectivity; they can slow it down, but they can't stop it. Despising and fearing knowledge, they will nonetheless inevitably decide to promote it in order to survive. Sooner or later they will be forced to allow universities and scientific societies, to create research centers, observatories, and laboratories, and thus to create a cadre of people of thought and knowledge: people who are completely beyond their control, people with a completely different psychology and with completely different needs. And these people cannot exist and certainly cannot function in the former atmosphere of low self-interest, banal preoccupations, dull self-satisfaction, and purely carnal needs. They need a new atmosphere- an atmosphere of comprehensive and inclusive learning, permeated with creative tension; they need writers, artists, composers- and the gray people in power are forced to make this concession too. The obstinate ones will be swept aside by their more cunning opponents in the struggle for power, but those who make this concession are, inevitably and paradoxically, digging their own graves against their will. For fatal to the ignorant egoists and fanatics is the growth of a full range of culture in the people- from research in the natural sciences to the ability to marvel at great music. And then comes the associated process of the broad intellectualization of society: an era in which grayness fights its last battles with a brutality that takes humanity back to the middle ages, loses these battles, and forever disappears as an actual force.

Arkady Strugatsky
and-no-matter-how-much-gray-people-in-power-despise-knowledge-they-cant-do-anything-about-historical-objectivity-they-can-slow-it-down-but-they-cant-stop-it-despising-fearing-kno
?Earn cash when you save a quote by clicking
EARNED Load...
LEVEL : Load...