Proust Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
ive-read-proust-stendhal-that-keeps-you-in-your-place
thats-it-then-this-is-how-it-ends-i-havent-even-read-proust-james-turner
i-find-its-impossible-for-me-to-read-proust
theres-nothing-like-taking-proust-to-beach-daydreaming-along-to-it
i-grew-up-reading-proust-all-my-life-hes-dear-to-me
i-identify-myself-as-what-i-am-im-half-jewish-like-proust-i-have-no-other-way-to-put-it
after-proust-there-are-certain-things-that-simply-cannot-be-done-again-he-marks-off-for-you-boundaries-your-talent
prousts-tea-cake-has-nothing-on-one-hour-in-college-dorm-gloria-steinem
the-novel-as-we-knew-it-in-nineteenth-century-was-killed-off-by-proust-joyce-alberto-moravia
my-mother-was-right-when-youve-got-nothing-left-all-you-can-do-is-get-into-silk-underwear-start-reading-proust
proust-was-greatest-novelist-twentieth-century-just-as-tolstoy-was-in-nineteenth-marcel-proust
there-was-moment-when-designers-draped-in-ermine-would-be-reading-proust-pretending-to
friendship-according-to-proust-is-negation-that-irremediable-solitude-to-which-every-human-being-is-condemned-samuel-beckett
i-am-reading-proust-for-first-time-very-poor-stuff-i-think-he-was-mentally-defective-evelyn-waugh
anyone-whos-read-all-proust-plus-the-man-withour-qualities-is-bound-t-be-missing-out-on-few-other-titles-lorrie-moore
nothing-would-have-shocked-proust-more-than-to-hear-that-his-work-was-perceived-as-difficult-inaccessibly-rarefied
it-is-prousts-courtesy-to-spare-reader-embarrassment-believing-himself-cleverer-than-author-theodor-adorno
narrative-art-the-novel-from-murasaki-to-proust-has-produced-great-works-of-poetry
ideally-id-like-to-spend-two-evenings-week-talking-to-proust-another-conversing-with-holy-ghost-edna-obrien
when-proust-urges-us-to-evaluate-world-properly-he-repeatedly-reminds-us-value-modest-scenes-alain-de-botton
sometimes-i-wish-i-could-go-back-through-time-to-meet-proust-just-i-could-give-him-my-asthma-inhaler-the-poor-guy
to-me-idea-living-this-lifestyle-is-boring-that-i-would-prefer-to-read-marcel-proust-whole-time-during-tour
proust-more-perspicaciously-than-any-other-writer-reminds-us-that-walks-childhood-form-raw-material-our-intelligence-bruce-chatwin
only-determined-resourceful-scholar-could-establish-manuscript-precedence-but-in-race-to-masturbate-on-printed-page-proust-definitely-came-first-michael-foley
proust-again-one-can-only-wish-that-man-with-such-powers-total-recall-had-led-less-tedious-life-moved-among-somewhat-livelier-circles-edward-abbey
im-sick-foodies-who-need-every-morsel-that-goes-into-their-mouth-to-be-picasso-painting-giacometti-sculpture-proust-novel-evoking-world-with-each-crumb
creating-is-living-doubly-the-groping-anxious-quest-proust-his-meticulous-collecting-flowers-wallpapers-anxieties-signifies-nothing-else-albert-camus
all-literature-up-to-today-is-sexist-the-muses-never-sang-to-poets-about-liberated-women-its-same-old-chanson-from-bible-homer-through-joyce-allan-bloom
we-now-know-that-memories-are-not-fixed-frozen-like-prousts-jars-preserves-in-larder-but-are-transformed-disassembled-reassembled-recategorized-oliver-sacks
it-is-prousts-implacable-honesty-his-reluctance-to-cut-corners-to-articulate-what-might-have-been-good-enough-credible-enough-in-any-other-writer-that-make-him-introspective-geni
i-didnt-go-to-university-i-hardly-went-to-school-but-i-grew-up-among-people-well-versed-in-henry-james-proust-just-felt-this-endless-total-inadequacy
in-country-like-france-ancient-their-history-is-full-outstanding-people-they-carry-heavy-weight-on-their-back-who-could-write-in-french-after-manuel-puig
homer-vergil-dante-shakespeare-goethe-proust-not-exactly-authors-one-expects-to-whiz-through-take-lightly-but-like-all-works-genius-they-are-meant-to-be-read-out-loud-loved
as-far-as-i-can-see-best-writers-in-last-two-hundred-years-have-been-whitman-rilke-proust-kafka-their-best-works-leaves-grass-1855-duino-elegies-the-captive-the-fugitive-the-cast
a-businessman-who-reads-business-week-is-lost-to-fame-one-who-reads-proust-is-marked-for-greatness-john-kenneth-galbraith
el-pasado-dece-proust-no-solo-es-fugaz-es-que-no-se-mueve-de-sitio-con-pares-pasa-lo-mismo-james-ha-salido-de-viaje-y-encima-es-interminable-no-se-acaba-nunca-enrique-vilamatas
if-what-proust-says-is-true-that-happiness-is-absence-fever-then-i-will-never-know-happiness-for-i-am-possessed-by-fever-for-knowledge-experience-creation-anais-nin
with-eric-rohmer-as-with-mozart-austen-james-proust-we-need-to-remember-that-art-is-seldom-about-life-not-quite-about-life-art-is-about-discovery-design-reasoning-with-chaos
it-should-not-be-illierscombray-that-we-visit-genuine-homage-to-proust-would-be-to-look-at-our-world-through-his-eyes-not-look-at-his-world-through-alain-de-botton
reading-proust-isnt-just-reading-book-its-experience-you-cant-reject-experience-william-gaddis
penser-cest-reapprendre-e-voir-e-etre-attentif-cest-diriger-sa-conscience-cest-faire-de-chaque-idee-et-de-chaque-image-e-la-faeon-de-proust-un-lieu-privilegie-albert-camus
if-one-were-to-list-all-cruelties-maltreatments-both-physical-emotional-that-parents-adults-inflict-on-children-under-guise-love-list-would-be-long-one-but-going-beyond-such-sini
Literary Fiction and Reality Towards the beginning of his novel The Man Without Qualities, Robert Musil announces that 'no serious attempt will be made to... enter into competition with reality.' And yet it is an element in the situation he cannot ignore. How good it would be, he suggests, if one could find in life ' the simplicity inherent in narrative order. 'This is the simple order that consists in being able to say: "When that had happened, then this happened." What puts our mind at rest is the simple sequence, the overwhelming variegation of life now represented in, as a mathematician would say, a unidimensional order.' We like the illusions of this sequence, its acceptable appearance of causality: 'it has the look of necessity.' But the look is illusory; Musil's hero Ulrich has 'lost this elementary narrative element' and so has Musil. The Man Without Qualities is multidimensional, fragmentary, without the possibility of a narrative end. Why could he not have his narrative order? Because 'everything has now become nonnarrative.' The illusion would be too gross and absurd. Musil belonged to the great epoch of experiment; after Joyce and Proust, though perhaps a long way after, he is the novelist of early modernism. And as you see he was prepared to spend most of his life struggling with the problems created by the divergence of comfortable story and the non-narrative contingencies of modern reality. Even in the earlier stories he concerned himself with this disagreeable but necessary dissociation; in his big novel he tries to create a new genre in which, by all manner of dazzling devices and metaphors and stratagems, fiction and reality can be brought together again. He fails; but the point is that he had to try, a sceptic to the point of mysticism and caught in a world in which, as one of his early characters notices, no curtain descends to conceal 'the bleak matter-of-factness of things.

Frank Kermode
literary-fiction-reality-towards-beginning-his-novel-the-man-without-qualities-robert-musil-announces-that-no-serious-attempt-will-be-made-to-enter-into-competition-with-reality-
The formerly absolute distinction between time and eternity in Christian thought-between nunc movens with its beginning and end, and nunc stans, the perfect possession of endless life-acquired a third intermediate order based on this peculiar betwixt-and-between position of angels. But like the Principle of Complementarity, this concord-fiction soon proved that it had uses outside its immediate context, angelology. Because it served as a means of talking about certain aspects of human experience, it was humanized. It helped one to think about the sense, men sometimes have of participating in some order of duration other than that of the nunc movens-of being able, as it were, to do all that angels can. Such are those moments which Augustine calls the moments of the soul's attentiveness; less grandly, they are moments of what psychologists call 'temporal integration.' When Augustine recited his psalm he found in it a figure for the integration of past, present, and future which defies successive time. He discovered what is now erroneously referred to as 'spatial form.' He was anticipating what we know of the relation between books and St. Thomas's third order of duration-for in the kind of time known by books a moment has endless perspectives of reality. We feel, in Thomas Mann's words, that 'in their beginning exists their middle and their end, their past invades the present, and even the most extreme attention to the present is invaded by concern for the future.' The concept of aevum provides a way of talking about this unusual variety of duration-neither temporal nor eternal, but, as Aquinas said, participating in both the temporal and the eternal. It does not abolish time or spatialize it; it co-exists with time, and is a mode in which things can be perpetual without being eternal. We've seen that the concept of aevum grew out of a need to answer certain specific Averroistic doctrines concerning origins. But it appeared quite soon that this medium inter aeternitatem et tempus had human uses. It contains beings (angels) with freedom of choice and immutable substance, in a creation which is in other respects determined. Although these beings are out of time, their acts have a before and an after. Aevum, you might say, is the time-order of novels. Characters in novels are independent of time and succession, but may and usually do seem to operate in time and succession; the aevum co-exists with temporal events at the moment of occurrence, being, it was said, like a stick in a river. Brabant believed that Bergson inherited the notion through Spinoza's duratio, and if this is so there is an historical link between the aevum and Proust; furthermore this duree reelle is, I think, the real sense of modern 'spatial form, ' which is a figure for the aevum.

Frank Kermode
the-formerly-absolute-distinction-between-time-eternity-in-christian-thoughtbetween-nunc-movens-with-its-beginning-end-nunc-stans-perfect-possession-endless-lifeacquired-third-in
It might be useful here to say a word about Beckett, as a link between the two stages, and as illustrating the shift towards schism. He wrote for transition, an apocalyptic magazine (renovation out of decadence, a Joachite indication in the title), and has often shown a flair for apocalyptic variations, the funniest of which is the frustrated millennialism of the Lynch family in Watt, and the most telling, perhaps, the conclusion of Comment c'est. He is the perverse theologian of a world which has suffered a Fall, experienced an Incarnation which changes all relations of past, present, and future, but which will not be redeemed. Time is an endless transition from one condition of misery to another, 'a passion without form or stations, ' to be ended by no parousia. It is a world crying out for forms and stations, and for apocalypse; all it gets is vain temporality, mad, multiform antithetical influx. It would be wrong to think that the negatives of Beckett are a denial of the paradigm in favour of reality in all its poverty. In Proust, whom Beckett so admires, the order, the forms of the passion, all derive from the last book; they are positive. In Beckett, the signs of order and form are more or less continuously presented, but always with a sign of cancellation; they are resources not to be believed in, cheques which will bounce. Order, the Christian paradigm, he suggests, is no longer usable except as an irony; that is why the Rooneys collapse in laughter when they read on the Wayside Pulpit that the Lord will uphold all that fall. But of course it is this order, however ironized, this continuously transmitted idea of order, that makes Beckett's point, and provides his books with the structural and linguistic features which enable us to make sense of them. In his progress he has presumed upon our familiarity with his habits of language and structure to make the relation between the occulted forms and the narrative surface more and more tenuous; in Comment c'est he mimes a virtually schismatic breakdown of this relation, and of his language. This is perfectly possible to reach a point along this line where nothing whatever is communicated, but of course Beckett has not reached it by a long way; and whatever preserves intelligibility is what prevents schism. This is, I think, a point to be remembered whenever one considers extremely novel, avant-garde writing. Schism is meaningless without reference to some prior condition; the absolutely New is simply unintelligible, even as novelty. It may, of course, be asked: unintelligible to whom? -the inference being that a minority public, perhaps very small-members of a circle in a square world-do understand the terms in which the new thing speaks. And certainly the minority public is a recognized feature of modern literature, and certainly conditions are such that there may be many small minorities instead of one large one; and certainly this is in itself schismatic. The history of European literature, from the time the imagination's Latin first made an accommodation with the lingua franca, is in part the history of the education of a public-cultivated but not necessarily learned, as Auerbach says, made up of what he calls la cour et la ville. That this public should break up into specialized schools, and their language grow scholastic, would only be surprising if one thought that the existence of excellent mechanical means of communication implied excellent communications, and we know it does not, McLuhan's 'the medium is the message' notwithstanding. But it is still true that novelty of itself implies the existence of what is not novel, a past. The smaller the circle, and the more ambitious its schemes of renovation, the less useful, on the whole, its past will be. And the shorter. I will return to these points in a moment.

Frank Kermode
it-might-be-useful-here-to-say-word-about-beckett-as-link-between-two-stages-as-illustrating-shift-towards-schism-he-wrote-for-transition-apocalyptic-magazine-renovation-out-deca
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