Puzzling Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
it-is-a-puzzling-thing-the-truth-knocks-on-the-door-and-you-say-go-away-im-looking-for-the-truth-and-so-it-goes-away-puzzling
the-british-constitution-has-always-been-puzzling-always-will-be-queen-elizabeth-ii
peoples-intolerance-i-find-puzzling
the-world-is-puzzling-place-if-youre-not-willing-to-be-puzzled-you-just-become-replica-someone-elses-mind-noam-chomsky
tis-very-puzzling-on-the-brink-of-what-is-called-eternity-to-stare-and-know-no-more-of-what-is-here-than-there
the-whole-conception-sin-is-one-which-i-find-puzzling-doubtless-owing-to-my-sinful-nature-bertrand-russell
intellectual-growth-is-when-you-surpass-barrier-puerility-puzzling-people-with-your-dazzling-creativity-michael-bassey-johnson
seriously-i-think-what-all-puzzling-over-parenthood-i-had-to-do-to-write-novelroom-taught-me-is-that-children-can-thrive-in-remarkable-range-emma-donoghue
and-now-finished-with-that-puzzling-mixture-insane-intimacy-isolation-which-is-notoriety-velvet-was-able-to-get-on-quietly-to-her-next-adventures-enid-bagnold
you-are-perfect-you-are-im-talking-to-you-dont-you-dare-think-otherwise-embrace-entity-yourself-you-are-puzzle-piece-you-are-meant-to-be-puzzling-kaiden-blake
what-song-syrens-sang-what-name-achilles-assumed-when-he-hid-himself-among-women-though-puzzling-questions-are-not-beyond-all-conjecture-thomas-browne
life-is-unresolved-confusing-bewildering-puzzling-ambiguous-you-dont-really-know-whats-going-to-happen-the-future-is-uncertain-for-everybody-woody-allen
find-most-puzzling-kind-art-you-can-think-then-go-out-try-to-approximate-it-with-your-camera-take-photograph-that-corresponds-to-it-assignment-john-baldessari
there-are-countless-artists-whose-shoes-i-am-not-worthy-to-polish-whose-prints-would-not-pay-printer-the-question-judgment-is-puzzling-one-maxfield-parrish
the-contradiction-puzzling-to-ordinary-way-thinking-comes-from-fact-that-we-have-to-use-language-to-communicate-our-inner-experience-which-in-its-dt-suzuki
plants-exist-in-weather-light-rays-that-surround-them-waving-in-wind-shimmering-in-sunlight-i-am-always-puzzling-over-how-to-draw-such-things-hayao-miyazaki
childhood-is-fundamental-part-all-human-lives-parents-not-since-thats-how-we-all-start-out-and-yet-babies-young-children-are-mysterious-puzzling-alison-gopnik
he-shivered-his-coat-was-thin-it-was-obvious-he-would-not-get-his-kiss-which-he-found-puzzling-the-manly-heroes-penny-dreadfuls-shilling-novels-never-had-these-problems-getting-k
i-have-been-both-praised-criticized-the-criticism-stung-but-praise-sometimes-bothered-me-even-more-to-have-received-such-praise-honors-has-always-been-puzzling-to-me
agatha-christies-writing-is-incredibly-skillful-because-her-books-are-incredibly-intellectually-puzzling-challenging
as-rule-more-bizarre-thing-is-less-mysterious-it-proves-to-be-it-is-your-commonplace-featureless-crimes-which-are-really-puzzling-just-as-commonplace-face-is-most-difficult-to-id
we-just-didnt-get-it-we-were-weakened-exhilarated-at-same-time-a-paranoiacs-nightmare-a-narcissists-dream-we-didnt-know-how-to-feel-flattered-raped-maybe-both-we-were-puzzling-at
the-truth-knocks-on-the-door-and-you-say-go-away-im-looking-for-the-truth-and-it-goes-away-puzzling
the-truth-knocks-on-door-you-say-go-away-im-looking-for-truth-it-goes-away-puzzling-robert-m-pirsig
i-never-tried-to-emulate-that-new-york-rap-style-what-i-do-is-quasi-rap-its-honky-rap-not-black-rap-i-find-it-puzzling-that-many-people-have-assumed-im-black
one-most-puzzling-things-about-novel-is-that-way-it-really-was-half-time-is-half-time-isnt-way-it-ought-to-be-in-novel-randall-jarrell
as-children-wrote-alice-raikes-mrs-wilson-fox-in-the-times-january-22-1932-we-lived-in-onslow-square-used-to-play-in-garden-behind-houses-charles-dodgson-used-to-stay-with-old-un
looking-back-into-childhood-is-like-turning-telescope-wrong-way-around-everything-appears-in-miniature-but-with-clarity-it-probably-does-not-deserve-moreover-it-has-become-concen
In The Sunset Sky The sunset sky dazzling with the golden hues, Taking bow in brilliant sparkle of experience Is it not a climax, of the story so far, that was today? Or is it building anticipation of the night yet to come. Watch the days go, some proud of their accomplishments Some leaving sighs of disappointments, Leaving all in awe of its Amaranthine twists and turns And the fortunate get to see the moon trying to steal the show from setting sun, Oh she is such a show off, isn't she, basking in reflected glory Its magical, the sunset sky, Puzzling, sometimes just like a riddle, Leaving the nature stunned and amazed For it has been filling the canvas whole day with colours And now the sunset threatens to hide them all And in dark all the colours will be same A cue for the wise. Sunset sky has so much to offer, is she not a fine exampleof how uncertain a life can be Often reminding no matter what you planned, there will besome unexpected returns For End has its own brain, its own script Charting its own course So why just the beginning, every moment of the life should be grand, meted with equal passion and fervor She has been so clever; the sunset sky Leaving Twinkling cryptic messages for the night sky For even the dark has sparkle and hope if you keep your head up, A constant reminder that exuberance is an attitude of deep, rich, warm hearts I want my sunset sky to be grand, magical, and full of stories of my life that has been And its memories to linger on in this world, in the tomorrow and a few more years to come

Soma Mukherjee
in-the-sunset-sky-the-sunset-sky-dazzling-with-golden-hues-taking-bow-in-brilliant-sparkle-experience-is-it-not-climax-story-far-that-was-today-or-is-it-building-anticipation-nig
It was The Gospel From Outer Space, by Kilgore Trout. It was about a visitor from outer space... [who] made a serious study of Christianity, to learn, if he could, why Christians found it so easy to be cruel. He concluded that at least part of the trouble was slipshod storytelling in the New Testament. He supposed that the intent of the Gospels was to teach people, among other things, to be merciful, even to the lowest of the low. But the Gospels actually taught this: Before you kill somebody, make absolutely sure he isn't well connected. So it goes. The flaw in the Christ stories, said the visitor from outer space, was that Christ, who didn't look like much, was actually the Son of the Most Powerful Being in the Universe. Readers understood that, so, when they came to the crucifixion, they naturally thought... : Oh, boy - they sure picked the wrong guy to lynch that time! And that thought had a brother: "There are right people to lynch." Who? People not well connected. So it goes. The visitor from outer space made a gift to Earth of a new Gospel. In it, Jesus really was a nobody, and a pain in the neck to a lot of people with better connections than he had. He still got to say all the lovely and puzzling things he said in the other Gospels. So the people amused themselves one day by nailing him to a cross and planting the cross in the ground. There couldn't possibly be any repercussions, the lynchers thought. The reader would have to think that too, since the Gospel hammered home again and again what a nobody Jesus was. And then, just before the nobody died, the heavens opened up, and there was thunder and lightning. The voice of God came crashing down. He told the people that he was adopting the bum as his son, giving him the full powers and privileges of the Son of the Creator of the Universe throughout all eternity. God said this: From this moment on, He will punish anybody who torments a bum who has no connections!

Kurt Vonnegut
it-was-the-gospel-from-outer-space-by-kilgore-trout-it-was-about-visitor-from-outer-space-who-made-serious-study-christianity-to-learn-if-he-could-why-christians-found-it-easy-to
The visitor from outer space made a serious study of Christianity, to learn, if he could, why Christians found it so easy to be cruel. He concluded that at least part of the trouble was slipshod storytelling in the New Testament. He supposed that the intent of the Gospels was to teach people, among other things, to be merciful, even to the lowest of the low. But the Gospels actually taught this: Before you kill somebody, make absolutely sure he isn't well connected. So it goes. The flaw in the Christ stories, said the visitor from outer space, was that Christ, who didn't look like much, was actually the Son of the Most Powerful Being in the Universe. Readers understood that, so, when they came to the crucifixion, they naturally thought, and Rosewater read out loud again: Oh, boy-they sure picked the wrong guy to lynch _that_ time! And that thought had a brother: 'There are right people to lynch.' Who? People not well connected. So it goes. The visitor from outer space made a gift to the Earth of a new Gospel. In it, Jesus really was a nobody, and a pain in the neck to a lot of people with better connections than he had. He still got to say all the lovely and puzzling things he said in the other Gospels. So the people amused themselves one day by nailing him to a cross and planting the cross in the ground. There couldn't possibly be any repercussions, the lynchers thought. The reader would have to think that, too, since the new Gospel hammered home again and again what a nobody Jesus was. And then, just before the nobody died, the heavens opened up, and there was thunder and lightning. The voice of God came crashing down. He told the people that he was adopting the bum as his son, giving him the full powers and privileges of The Son of the Creator of the Universe throughout all eternity. God said this: From this moment on, He will punish horribly anybody who torments a bum who has no connections.

Kurt Vonnegut
the-visitor-from-outer-space-made-serious-study-christianity-to-learn-if-he-could-why-christians-found-it-easy-to-be-cruel-he-concluded-that-at-least-part-trouble-was-slipshod-st
I have used the theologians and their treatment of apocalypse as a model of what we might expect to find not only in more literary treatments of the same radical fiction, but in the literary treatment of radical fictions in general. The assumptions I have made in doing so I shall try to examine next time. Meanwhile it may be useful to have some kind of summary account of what I've been saying. The main object: is the critical business of making sense of some of the radical ways of making sense of the world. Apocalypse and the related themes are strikingly long-lived; and that is the first thing to say tbout them, although the second is that they change. The Johannine acquires the characteristics of the Sibylline Apocalypse, and develops other subsidiary fictions which, in the course of time, change the laws we prescribe to nature, and specifically to time. Men of all kinds act, as well as reflect, as if this apparently random collocation of opinion and predictions were true. When it appears that it cannot be so, they act as if it were true in a different sense. Had it been otherwise, Virgil could not have been altissimo poeta in a Christian tradition; the Knight Faithful and True could not have appeared in the opening stanzas of "The Faerie Queene". And what is far more puzzling, the City of Apocalypse could not have appeared as a modern Babylon, together with the 'shipmen and merchants who were made rich by her' and by the 'inexplicable splendour' of her 'fine linen, and purple and scarlet, ' in The Waste Land, where we see all these things, as in Revelation, 'come to nought.' Nor is this a matter of literary allusion merely. The Emperor of the Last Days turns up as a Flemish or an Italian peasant, as Queen Elizabeth or as Hitler; the Joachite transition as a Brazilian revolution, or as the Tudor settlement, or as the Third Reich. The apocalyptic types-empire, decadence and renovation, progress and catastrophe-are fed by history and underlie our ways of making sense of the world from where we stand, in the middest.

Frank Kermode
i-have-used-theologians-their-treatment-apocalypse-as-model-what-we-might-expect-to-find-not-only-in-more-literary-treatments-same-radical-fiction-but-in-literary-treatment-radic
The greatest book in the world, the Mahabharata, tells us we all have to live and die by our karmic cycle. Thus works the perfect reward-and-punishment, cause-and-effect, code of the universe. We live out in our present life what we wrote out in our last. But the great moral thriller also orders us to rage against karma and its despotic dictates. It teaches us to subvert it. To change it. It tells us we also write out our next lives as we live out our present. The Mahabharata is not a work of religious instruction. It is much greater. It is a work of art. It understands men will always fall in the shifting chasm between the tug of the moral and the lure of the immoral. It is in this shifting space of uncertitude that men become men. Not animals, not gods. It understands truth is relative. That it is defined by context and motive. It encourages the noblest of men - Yudhishtra, Arjuna, Lord Krishna himself - to lie, so that a greater truth may be served. It understands the world is powered by desire. And that desire is an unknowable thing. Desire conjures death, destruction, distress. But also creates love, beauty, art. It is our greatest undoing. And the only reason for all doing. And doing is life. Doing is karma. Thus it forgives even those who desire intemperately. It forgives Duryodhana. The man who desires without pause. The man who precipitates the war to end all wars. It grants him paradise and the admiration of the gods. In the desiring and the doing this most reviled of men fulfils the mandate of man. You must know the world before you are done with it. You must act on desire before you renounce it. There can be no merit in forgoing the not known. The greatest book in the world rescues volition from religion and gives it back to man. Religion is the disciplinarian fantasy of a schoolmaster. The Mahabharata is the joyous song of life of a maestro. In its tales within tales it takes religion for a spin and skins it inside out. Leaves it puzzling over its own poisoned follicles. It gives men the chance to be splendid. Doubt-ridden architects of some small part of their lives. Duryodhanas who can win even as they lose.

Tarun J. Tejpal
the-greatest-book-in-world-mahabharata-tells-us-we-all-have-to-live-die-by-our-karmic-cycle-thus-works-perfect-rewardpunishment-causeeffect-code-universe-we-live-out-in-our-prese
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