Simile Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
ill-buy-metaphor-but-similes-copout-used-by-scaredycats-who-wont-commit-to-anything-similes-for-cowards-alan-garner
the-simile-has-to-match-tone-its-surroundings-has-to-be-like-little-joke-writing-simile-that-isnt-funny-on-some-level-is-quite-hard-ned-beauman
life-is-like-simile-terry-carr
a-metaphor-is-like-simile-steven-wright
a-simile-is-just-metaphor-with-scaffolding-still-up-james-geary
the-wisdom-our-ancestors-is-in-simile-charles-dickens
i-went-out-on-date-with-simile-i-dont-know-what-i-metaphor-tim-vine
never-use-metaphor-simile-other-figure-speech-which-you-are-used-to-seeing-in-print-george-orwell
grahams-life-is-as-tense-as-overstretched-simile-zane-stumpo
a-simile-committing-suicide-is-always-depressing-spectacle-oscar-wilde
a-good-simileas-concise-as-kings-declaration-love-laurence-sterne
old-marley-was-dead-as-doornail-the-wisdom-our-ancestors-is-in-simile-charles-dickens
a-smile-is-like-simile-if-you-have-mouth-like-metaphor-that-would-make-for-like-best-kiss-ever-jarod-kintz
he-had-gone-beyond-world-metaphor-amp-simile-into-place-things-that-are-it-was-changing-him-neil-gaiman
one-thing-that-literature-would-be-greatly-better-forwould-be-more-restricted-employment-by-authors-simile-metaphor-ogden-nash
and-grade-every-simile-metaphor-from-one-star-to-five-remove-any-threes-below-it-hurts-when-you-operate-but-afterwards-you-feel-much-better-david-mitchell
on-heights-it-is-warmer-than-people-in-valley-suppose-especially-in-winter-the-thinker-recognizes-full-import-this-simile-friedrich-nietzsche
death-real-simile-for-disease-for-when-we-are-ill-do-we-not-always-feel-like-we-are-dying-even-if-its-only-little-remains-despite-our-secularism-will-self
my-stern-chase-after-time-is-to-borrow-simile-from-tom-paine-like-race-man-with-wooden-leg-after-horse-john-quincy-adams
to-borrow-simile-from-football-field-we-believe-that-men-must-play-fair-but-that-there-must-be-no-shirking-that-success-can-only-come-to-player-theodore-roosevelt
without-forgetting-f-word-which-some-overdosed-victims-patients-it-misuse-it-as-verb-adverb-simile-adjective-noun-whenever-mouth-opens-besto-muzenda
the-beautiful-part-writing-is-that-you-dont-have-to-get-it-right-first-time-unlike-say-brain-surgeon-you-can-always-do-it-better-find-exact-word-robert-cormier
the-simile-sets-two-ideas-side-by-side-in-metaphor-they-become-superimposed-f-l-lucas
how-is-it-that-from-beauty-i-have-derived-type-unlovelinessfrom-covenant-peace-simile-sorrow-but-as-in-ethics-evil-is-consequence-good-in-fact-out-joy-is-sorrow-born-edgar-allan-
in-mainstream-literature-trope-is-figure-speech-metaphor-simile-irony-like-words-used-other-than-literally-in-sf-trope-at-least-as-i-understand-usage-is-more-science-used-other-t
a-simile-is-like-pair-eyeglasses-one-side-sees-this-one-side-sees-that-device-brings-them-together-george-mcwhirter
perche-dopo-averla-rinviata-in-cose-tanti-modi-credo-che-la-mia-trasformazione-sare-pie-radicale-del-previsto-che-potrei-diventare-davvero-qualcosa-di-simile-alla-creatura-lament
Very Like a Whale One thing that literature would be greatly the better for Would be a more restricted employment by authors of simile and metaphor. Authors of all races, be they Greeks, Romans, Teutons or Celts, Can'ts seem just to say that anything is the thing it is but have to go out of their way to say that it is like something else. What foes it mean when we are told That the Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold? In the first place, George Gordon Byron had had enough experience To know that it probably wasn't just one Assyrian, it was a lot of Assyrians. However, as too many arguments are apt to induce apoplexy and thus hinder longevity, We'll let it pass as one Assyrian for the sake of brevity. Now then, this particular Assyrian, the one whose cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold, Just what does the poet mean when he says he came down like a wolf on the fold? In heaven and earth more than is dreamed of in our philosophy there are a great many things, But i don't imagine that among then there is a wolf with purple and gold cohorts or purple and gold anythings. No, no, Lord Byron, before I'll believe that this Assyrian was actually like a wolf I must have some kind of proof; Did he run on all fours and did he have a hairy tail and a big red mouth and big white teeth and did he say Woof woof? Frankly I think it very unlikely, and all you were entitled to say, at the very most, Was that the Assyrian cohorts came down like a lot of Assyrian cohorts about to destroy the Hebrew host. But that wasn't fancy enough for Lord Byron, oh dear me no, he had to invent a lot of figures of speech and then interpolate them, With the result that whenever you mention Old Testament soldiers to people they say Oh yes, they're the ones that a lot of wolves dressed up in gold and purple ate them. That's the kind of thing that's being done all the time by poets, from Homer to Tennyson; They're always comparing ladies to lilies and veal to venison, And they always say things like that the snow is a white blanket after a winter storm. Oh it is, is it, all right then, you sleep under a six-inch blanket of snow and I'll sleep under a half-inch blanket of unpoetical blanket material and we'll see which one keeps warm, And after that maybe you'll begin to comprehend dimly, What I mean by too much metaphor and simile.

Ogden Nash
very-like-whale-one-thing-that-literature-would-be-greatly-better-for-would-be-more-restricted-employment-by-authors-simile-metaphor-authors-all-races-be-they-greeks-romans-teuto
let-us-return-for-moment-to-lady-lovelaces-objection-which-stated-that-machine-can-only-do-what-we-tell-it-to-do-one-could-say-that-man-can-inject-idea-into-machine-that-it-will-
Rapture I can feel she has got out of bed. That means it is seven a.m. I have been lying with eyes shut, thinking, or possibly dreaming, of how she might look if, at breakfast, I spoke about the hidden place in her which, to me, is like a soprano's tremolo, and right then, over toast and bramble jelly, if such things are possible, she came. I imagine she would show it while trying to conceal it. I imagine her hair would fall about her face and she would become apparently downcast, as she does at a concert when she is moved. The hypnopompic play passes, and I open my eyes and there she is, next to the bed, bending to a low drawer, picking over various small smooth black, white, and pink items of underwear. She bends so low her back runs parallel to the earth, but there is no sway in it, there is little burden, the day has hardly begun. The two mounds of muscles for walking, leaping, lovemaking, lift toward the east-what can I say? Simile is useless; there is nothing like them on earth. Her breasts fall full; the nipples are deep pink in the glare shining up through the iron bars of the gate under the earth where those who could not love press, wanting to be born again. I reach out and take her wrist and she falls back into bed and at once starts unbuttoning my pajamas. Later, when I open my eyes, there she is again, rummaging in the same low drawer. The clock shows eight. Hmmm. With huge, silent effort of great, mounded muscles the earth has been turning. She takes a piece of silken cloth from the drawer and stands up. Under the falls of hair her face has become quiet and downcast, as if she will be, all day among strangers, looking down inside herself at our rapture.

Galway Kinnell
rapture-i-can-feel-she-has-got-out-bed-that-means-it-is-seven-m-i-have-been-lying-with-eyes-shut-thinking-possibly-dreaming-how-she-might-look-if-at-breakfast-i-spoke-about-hidde
The affinities of all the beings of the same class have sometimes been represented by a great tree.I believe this simile largely speaks the truth. The green and budding twigs may represent existing species; and those produced during former years may represent the long succession of extinct species. At each period of growth all the growing twigs have tried to branch out on all sides, and to overtop and kill the surrounding twigs and branches, in the same manner as species and groups of species have at all times overmastered other species in the great battle for life. The limbs divided into great branches, and these into lesser and lesser branches, were themselves once, when the tree was young, budding twigs; and this connection of the former and present buds by ramifying branches may well represent the classification of all extinct and living species in groups subordinate to groups. Of the many twigs which flourished when the tree was a mere bush, only two or three, now grown into great branches, yet survive and bear the other branches; so with the species which lived during long-past geological periods, very few have left living and modified descendants. From the first growth of the tree, many a limb and branch has decayed and dropped off; and these fallen branches of various sizes may represent those whole orders, families, and genera which have now no living representatives, and which are known to us only in a fossil state. As we here and there see a thin straggling branch springing from a fork low down in a tree, and which by some chance has been favoured and is still alive on its summit, so we occasionally see an animal like the Ornithorhynchus or Lepidosiren, which in some small degree connects by its affinities two large branches of life, and which has apparently been saved from fatal competition by having inhabited a protected station. As buds give rise by growth to fresh buds, and these, if vigorous, branch out and overtop on all sides many a feebler branch, so by generation I believe it has been with the great Tree of Life, which fills with its dead and broken branches the crust of the earth, and covers the surface with its ever-branching and beautiful ramifications.

Charles Darwin
the-affinities-all-beings-same-class-have-sometimes-been-represented-by-great-treei-believe-this-simile-largely-speaks-truth-the-green-budding-twigs-may-represent-existing-specie
When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature. If a writer can make people live there may be no great characters in his book, but it is possible that his book will remain as a whole; as an entity; as a novel. If the people the writer is making talk of old masters; of music; of modern painting; of letters; or of science then they should talk of those subjects in the novel. If they do not talk of these subjects and the writer makes them talk of them he is a faker, and if he talks about them himself to show how much he knows then he is showing off. No matter how good a phrase or a simile he may have if he puts it in where it is not absolutely necessary and irreplaceable he is spoiling his work for egotism. Prose is architecture, not interior decoration, and the Baroque is over. For a writer to put his own intellectual musings, which he might sell for a low price as essays, into the mouths of artificially constructed characters which are more remunerative when issued as people in a novel is good economics, perhaps, but does not make literature. People in a novel, not skillfully constructed characters, must be projected from the writer's assimilated experience, from his knowledge, from his head, from his heart and from all there is of him. If he ever has luck as well as seriousness and gets them out entire they will have more than one dimension and they will last a long time. A good writer should know as near everything as possible. Naturally he will not. A great enough writer seems to be born with knowledge. But he really is not; he has only been born with the ability to learn in a quicker ratio to the passage of time than other men and without conscious application, and with an intelligence to accept or reject what is already presented as knowledge. There are some things which cannot be learned quickly and time, which is all we have, must be paid heavily for their acquiring. They are the very simplest things and because it takes a man's life to know them the little new that each man gets from life is very costly and the only heritage he has to leave. Every novel which is truly written contributes to the total of knowledge which is there at the disposal of the next writer who comes, but the next writer must pay, always, a certain nominal percentage in experience to be able to understand and assimilate what is available as his birthright and what he must, in turn, take his departure from. If a writer of prose knows enough about what he is writing about he may omit things that he knows and the reader, if the writer is writing truly enough, will have a feeling of those things as strongly as though the writer had stated them. The dignity of movement of an ice-berg is due to only one-eighth of it being above water. A writer who omits things because he does not know them only makes hollow places in his writing. A writer who appreciates the seriousness of writing so little that he is anxious to make people see he is formally educated, cultured or well-bred is merely a popinjay. And this too remember; a serious writer is not to be confounded with a solemn writer. A serious writer may be a hawk or a buzzard or even a popinjay, but a solemn writer is always a bloody owl.

Ernest Hemingway
when-writing-novel-writer-should-create-living-people-people-not-characters-a-character-is-caricature-if-writer-can-make-people-live-there-may-be-no-great-characters-in-his-book-
Eliot's understanding of poetic epistemology is a version of Bradley's theory, outlined in our second chapter, that knowing involves immediate, relational, and transcendent stages or levels. The poetic mind, like the ordinary mind, has at least two types of experience: The first consists largely of feeling (falling in love, smelling the cooking, hearing the noise of the typewriter), the second largely of thought (reading Spinoza). The first type of experience is sensuous, and it is also to a great extent monistic or immediate, for it does not require mediation through the mind; it exists before intellectual analysis, before the falling apart of experience into experiencer and experienced. The second type of experience, in contrast, is intellectual (to be known at all, it must be mediated through the mind) and sharply dualistic, in that it involves a breaking down of experience into subject and object. In the mind of the ordinary person, these two types of experience are and remain disparate. In the mind of the poet, these disparate experiences are somehow transcended and amalgamated into a new whole, a whole beyond and yet including subject and object, mind and matter. Eliot illustrates his explanation of poetic epistemology by saying that John Donne did not simply feel his feelings and think his thoughts; he felt his thoughts and thought his feelings. He was able to "feel his thought as immediately as the odour of a rose." Immediately" in this famous simile is a technical term in philosophy, used with precision; it means unmediated through mind, unshattered into subject and object. Falling in love and reading Spinoza typify Eliot's own experiences in the years in which he was writing The Waste Land. These were the exciting and exhausting years in which he met Vivien Haigh-Wood and consummated a disastrous marriage, the years in which he was deeply involved in reading F. H. Bradley, the years in which he was torn between the professions of philosophy and poetry and in which he was in close and frequent contact with such brilliant and stimulating figures as Bertrand Russell and Ezra Pound, the years of the break from his family and homeland, the years in which in every area of his life he seemed to be between broken worlds. The experiences of these years constitute the material of The Waste Land. The relevant biographical details need not be reviewed here, for they are presented in the introduction to The Waste Land Facsimile. For our purposes, it is only necessary to acknowledge what Eliot himself acknowledged: the material of art is always actual life. At the same time, it should also be noted that material in itself is not art. As Eliot argued in his review of Ulysses, "in creation you are responsible for what you can do with material which you must simply accept." For Eliot, the given material included relations with and observations of women, in particular, of his bright but seemingly incurably ill wife Vivien(ne).

Jewel Spears Brooker
eliots-understanding-poetic-epistemology-is-version-bradleys-theory-outlined-in-our-second-chapter-that-knowing-involves-immediate-relational-transcendent-stages-levels-the-poeti
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