Sneering Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
i-hate-word-sneering-i-cant-help-way-my-face-looks
it-is-just-as-hard-to-do-your-duty-when-men-are-sneering-at-you-as-when-they-are-shouting-at-you-woodrow-wilson
my-family-pride-is-something-inconceivable-i-cant-help-it-i-was-born-sneering
sneering-springs-out-wish-to-deny-wretched-must-that-state-mind-be-that-wishes-to-take-refuge-in-doubt-letitia-elizabeth-landon
no-friend-had-i-made-there-but-i-wasnt-with-this-group-to-make-friends-besides-he-sneered-too-much-ive-found-that-people-who-sneer-are-almost-always-sneering-at-me-megan-whalen-t
they-who-suspect-mephistophiles-sneering-satirical-devil-under-all-have-not-learned-secret-true-humor-which-sympathizes-with-gods-themselves-in-view-their-grotesque-halffinished-
Adelia began to get cross. Why was it women who were to blame for everything-everything, from the Fall of Man to these blasted hedges? 'We are not in a labyrinth, my lord, ' she said clearly. 'Where are we, then?' 'It's a maze.' 'Same difference.' Puffing at the horse: 'Get back, you great cow.' 'No, it isn't. A labyrinth has only one path and you merely have to follow it. It's a symbol of life or, rather, of life and death. Labyrinths twist and turn, but they have a beginning and an end, through darkness into light.' Softening, and hoping that he would, too, she added, 'Like Ariadne's. Rather beautiful, really.' 'I don't want mythology, mistress, beautiful or not, I want to get to that sodding tower. What's a maze when it's at home?' 'It's a trick. A trick to confuse. To amaze.' 'And I suppose Mistress Clever-boots knows how to get us out?' 'I do, actually.' God's rib, he was sneering at her, sneering. She'd a mind to stay where she was and let him sweat. 'Then in the name of Christ, do it.' 'Stop bellowing at me, ' she yelled at him. 'You're bellowing.' She saw his teeth grit in the pretense of a placatory smile; he always had good teeth. Still did. Between them, he said, 'The Bishop of Saint Albans presents his compliments to Mistress Adelia and please to escort him out of this hag's hole, for the love of God. How will you do it?' 'My business.' Be damned if she'd tell him. Women were defenseless enough without revealing their secrets. 'I'll have to take the lead.' She stumped along in front, holding Walt's mount's reins in her right hand. In the other was her riding crop, which she trailed with apparent casualness so that it brushed against the hedge on her left. As she went, she chuntered to herself. Lord, how disregarded I am in this damned country. How disregarded all women are... Ironically, the lower down the social scale women were, the greater freedom they had; the wives of laborers and craftsmen could work alongside their men-even, sometimes, when they were widowed, take over their husband's trade. Adelia trudged on. Hag's hole. Grendel's mother's entrails. Why was this dreadful place feminine to the men lost in it? Because it was tunneled? Womb-like? Is this woman's magic? The great womb? Is that why the Church hates me, hates all women? Because we are the source of all true power? Of life? She supposed that by leading them out of it, she was only confirming that a woman knew its secrets and they did not. Great God, she thought, it isn't a question of hatred. It's fear. They are frightened of us. And Adelia laughed quietly, sending a suggestion of sound reverberating backward along the tunnel, as if a small pebble was skipping on water, making each man start when it passed him. 'What in hell was that?' Walt called back stolidly, 'Reckon someone's laughing at us, master.' 'Dear God.

Ariana Franklin
adelia-began-to-get-cross-why-was-it-women-who-were-to-blame-for-everythingeverything-from-fall-man-to-these-blasted-hedges-we-are-not-in-labyrinth-my-lord-she-said-clearly-where
i-have-never-fully-unbosomed-myself-to-any-human-being-i-have-never-been-encouraged-to-trust-much-in-sympathy-my-fellow-men-but-we-have-all-chance-meeting-with-some-pity-some-ten
But there is a way of despising the dandelion which is not that of the dreary pessimist, but of the more offensive optimist. It can be done in various ways; one of which is saying, "You can get much better dandelions at Selfridge's, " or "You can get much cheaper dandelions at Woolworth's." Another way is to observe with a casual drawl, "Of course nobody but Gamboli in Vienna really understands dandelions, " or saying that nobody would put up with the old-fashioned dandelion since the super-dandelion has been grown in the Frankfurt Palm Garden; or merely sneering at the stinginess of providing dandelions, when all the best hostesses give you an orchid for your buttonhole and a bouquet of rare exotics to take away with you. These are all methods of undervaluing the thing by comparison; for it is not familiarity but comparison that breeds contempt. And all such captious comparisons are ultimately based on the strange and staggering heresy that a human being has a right to dandelions; that in some extraordinary fashion we can demand the very pick of all the dandelions in the garden of Paradise; that we owe no thanks for them at all and need feel no wonder at them at all; and above all no wonder at being thought worthy to receive them. Instead of saying, like the old religious poet, "What is man that Thou carest for him, or the son of man that Thou regardest him?" we are to say like the discontented cabman, "What's this?" or like the bad-tempered Major in the club, "Is this a chop fit for a gentleman?" Now I not only dislike this attitude quite as much as the Swinburnian pessimistic attitude, but I think it comes to very much the same thing; to the actual loss of appetite for the chop or the dish of dandelion-tea. And the name of it is Presumption and the name of its twin brother is Despair. This is the principle I was maintaining when I seemed an optimist to Mr. Max Beerbohm; and this is the principle I am still maintaining when I should undoubtedly seem a pessimist to Mr. Gordon Selfridge. The aim of life is appreciation; there is no sense in not appreciating things; and there is no sense in having more of them if you have less appreciation of them.

G.K. Chesterton
but-there-is-way-despising-dandelion-which-is-not-that-dreary-pessimist-but-more-offensive-optimist-it-can-be-done-in-various-ways-one-which-is-saying-you-can-get-much-better-dan
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