Stoic Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
youre-pretty-cool-customer-huh-says-agent-hunt-i-hide-my-inner-pain-under-my-stoic-visage-agent-hunt-looks-like-he-would-like-to-put-his-fist-through-holly-black
it-is-better-to-be-wellrounded-christian-than-stoic-hypocrite-lisa-askew
a-civilization-is-born-stoic-dies-epicurean-will-durant
fourteen-years-without-mother-had-me-believe-i-could-be-stoic-when-i-finally-met-her-maria-v-snyder
people-compare-me-to-angelina-jolie-shes-serious-stoic-im-opposite-megan-fox
the-stoic-contemplates-fallen-leaves-epicure-rakes-them-into-loveseat-bauvard
i-think-im-incredibly-stoic-if-i-have-bad-headache-it-takes-while-before-i-reach-for-tablet
the-essential-american-soul-is-hard-isolate-stoic-killer-it-has-never-yet-melted-d-h-lawrence
as-stoic-i-must-despise-injury-rather-i-must-not-feel-it-must-not-be-affected-by-it-that-it-cannot-violate-freedom-my-soul-alexandra-davidneel
i-am-bit-sassy-with-some-sarcasm-thrown-into-mix-but-stoic-at-same-time-brash
i-practice-stoic-philosophy-as-human-being-you-may-have-emotions-but-these-dont-need-to-affect-your-soul-the-two-are-not-one-daphne-guinness
it-made-costis-wonder-for-first-time-just-how-much-stoic-man-really-wants-to-hide-when-he-unsuccessfully-pretends-not-to-be-in-pain-megan-whalen-turner
a-stoic-is-someone-who-transforms-fear-into-prudence-pain-into-transformation-mistakes-into-initiation-desire-into-undertaking-nassim-nicholas-taleb
be-gumdrop-deep-in-rock-be-stoic-bird-be-million-dollar-bill-be-four-letter-word-fruit-bats
to-become-stoic-is-to-endorse-truthfulness-its-world-view-accept-its-prescription-for-how-you-ought-to-live-not-just-to-like-how-it-makes-you-feel-julian-baggini
the-guy-behind-counter-scratches-his-neck-are-you-being-serious-her-face-is-stoic-absolutely-i-never-kid-about-teddy-bears-jessica-sorensen
let-stoic-open-resources-man-tell-men-they-are-not-leaning-willows-but-can-must-detach-themselves-that-with-exercise-selftrust-new-powers-shall-ralph-waldo-emerson
an-aristocratic-culture-does-not-advertise-its-emotions-in-its-forms-of-expression-it-is-sober-and-reserved-its-general-attitude-is-stoic
sighing-he-settled-into-his-chair-watching-vision-space-at-his-front-it-was-stoic-calm-never-endingdeadly-if-you-werent-careful-kiersten-fay
no-doubt-much-joy-great-romance-is-moment-when-these-stoic-heroes-crack-open-reveal-themselves-to-their-heroines-only-women-strong-enough-to-match-them
ithough-forced-through-lack-space-to-assume-form-stoic-guinea-pig-crouched-between-girls-shoe-glove-compartmentwas-my-usual-dignified-self-jonathan-stroud
in-shimmering-ignorance-illiteracy-compassion-faith-stoic-desire-loving-without-temporal-gains-rules-hearts-minds-in-deeds-care-meenakshi-ahlawat
in-his-numerous-historical-scriptural-works-bauer-rejects-all-supernatural-religion-represents-christianity-as-natural-product-mingling-stoic-alexandrian-philosophies-joseph-mcca
belief-in-god-and-a-future-life-makes-it-possible-to-go-through-life-with-less-of-stoic-courage-than-is-needed-by-sceptics
before-you-realize-this-truth-say-yogis-you-will-always-be-in-despair-notion-nicely-expressed-in-this-exasperated-line-from-greek-stoic-philosopher-epictetus-you-bear-god-within-
im-stoic-like-statue-stonewall-jackson-id-make-great-us-president-but-id-make-even-better-chiseled-piece-marble-thats-what-makes-me-such-amazing-lover-jarod-kintz
i-love-the-sportswriter-by-richard-ford-ford-really-captures-for-me-bittersweetness-quietly-suffering-american-man-its-stoic-sad-really-beautiful
the-main-thing-was-finding-this-voice-that-i-had-interest-in-which-ill-call-quiet-yet-stoic-voice-quiet-yet-strong-voice-that-i-developed-that-people-would-want-to-hear-that-was-
if-given-choice-between-stoic-justice-compassion-i-choose-compassion-and-if-given-choice-between-worldly-leadership-heaven-at-my-feeti-choose-heaven-yasmin-mogahed
Bohr is really doing what the Stoic allegorists did to close the gap between their world and Homer's, or what St. Augustine did when he explained, against the evidence, the concord of the canonical scriptures. The dissonances as well as the harmonies have to be made concordant by means of some ultimate complementarity. Later biblical scholarship has sought different explanations, and more sophisticated concords; but the motive is the same, however the methods may differ. An epoch, as Einstein remarked, is the instruments of its research. Stoic physics, biblical typology, Copenhagen quantum theory, are all different, but all use concord-fictions and assert complementarities. Such fictions meet a need. They seem to do what Bacon said poetry could: 'give some show of satisfaction to the mind, wherein the nature of things doth seem to deny it.' Literary fictions ( Bacon's 'poetry') do likewise. One consequence is that they change, for the same reason that patristic allegory is not the same thing, though it may be essentially the same kind of thing, as the physicists' Principle of Complementarity. The show of satisfaction will only serve when there seems to be a degree of real compliance with reality as we, from time to time, imagine it. Thus we might imagine a constant value for the irreconcileable observations of the reason and the imagination, the one immersed in chronos, the other in kairos; but the proportions vary indeterminably. Or, when we find 'what will suffice, ' the element of what I have called the paradigmatic will vary. We measure and order time with our fictions; but time seems, in reality, to be ever more diverse and less and less subject to any uniform system of measurement. Thus we think of the past in very different timescales, according to what we are doing; the time of the art-historian is different from that of the geologist, that of the football coach from the anthropologist's. There is a time of clocks, a time of radioactive carbon, a time even of linguistic change, as in lexicostatics. None of these is the same as the 'structural' or 'family' time of sociology. George Kubler in his book The Shape of Time distinguished between 'absolute' and 'systematic' age, a hierarchy of durations from that of the coral reef to that of the solar year. Our ways of filling the interval between the tick and tock must grow more difficult and more selfcritical, as well as more various; the need we continue to feel is a need of concord, and we supply it by increasingly varied concord-fictions. They change as the reality from which we, in the middest, seek a show of satisfaction, changes; because 'times change.' The fictions by which we seek to find 'what will suffice' change also. They change because we no longer live in a world with an historical tick which will certainly be consummated by a definitive tock. And among all the other changing fictions, literary fictions take their place. They find out about the changing world on our behalf; they arrange our complementarities. They do this, for some of us, perhaps better than history, perhaps better than theology, largely because they are consciously false; but the way to understand their development is to see how they are related to those other fictional systems. It is not that we are connoisseurs of chaos, but that we are surrounded by it, and equipped for coexistence with it only by our fictive powers. This may, in the absence of a supreme fiction-or the possibility of it, be a hard fate; which is why the poet of that fiction is compelled to say From this the poem springs: that we live in a place That is not our own, and much more, nor ourselves And hard it is, in spite of blazoned days.

Frank Kermode
bohr-is-really-doing-what-stoic-allegorists-did-to-close-gap-between-their-world-homers-what-st-augustine-did-when-he-explained-against-evidence-concord-canonical-scriptures-the-
the-yogic-path-is-about-disentangling-builtin-glitches-human-condition-which-im-going-to-oversimply-define-here-as-heartbreaking-inability-to-sustain-contentment-different-school
You desire to LIVE "according to Nature"? Oh, you noble Stoics, what fraud of words! Imagine to yourselves a being like Nature, boundlessly extravagant, boundlessly indifferent, without purpose or consideration, without pity or justice, at once fruitful and barren and uncertain: imagine to yourselves INDIFFERENCE as a power-how COULD you live in accordance with such indifference? To live-is not that just endeavouring to be otherwise than this Nature? Is not living valuing, preferring, being unjust, being limited, endeavouring to be different? And granted that your imperative, "living according to Nature, " means actually the same as "living according to life"-how could you do DIFFERENTLY? Why should you make a principle out of what you yourselves are, and must be? In reality, however, it is quite otherwise with you: while you pretend to read with rapture the canon of your law in Nature, you want something quite the contrary, you extraordinary stage-players and self-deluders! In your pride you wish to dictate your morals and ideals to Nature, to Nature herself, and to incorporate them therein; you insist that it shall be Nature "according to the Stoa, " and would like everything to be made after your own image, as a vast, eternal glorification and generalism of Stoicism! With all your love for truth, you have forced yourselves so long, so persistently, and with such hypnotic rigidity to see Nature FALSELY, that is to say, Stoically, that you are no longer able to see it otherwise-and to crown all, some unfathomable superciliousness gives you the Bedlamite hope that BECAUSE you are able to tyrannize over yourselves-Stoicism is self-tyranny-Nature will also allow herself to be tyrannized over: is not the Stoic a PART of Nature?... But this is an old and everlasting story: what happened in old times with the Stoics still happens today, as soon as ever a philosophy begins to believe in itself. It always creates the world in its own image; it cannot do otherwise; philosophy is this tyrannical impulse itself, the most spiritual Will to Power, the will to "creation of the world, " the will to the causa prima.

Friedrich Nietzsche
you-desire-to-live-according-to-nature-oh-you-noble-stoics-what-fraud-words-imagine-to-yourselves-being-like-nature-boundlessly-extravagant-boundlessly-indifferent-without-purpos
Except fang. I glared at him. "Go on, try to stop me, I dare you." It was like the old days when we used to wrestle, each trying to get the better of the other. I was ready to take him down, my hands curled into fist. "I was just going to say be careful, " Fang told me. He stepped closer and brushed some hair out of my eyes. "And I've got your back." He motioned with his head toward the torpedo chamber. Oh my God. It hit me like a tsunami then, how perfect he was for me, how no one else would ever, could ever, be so perfect for me, how he was everything I could possibly hope for, as a friend, boyfriend, maybe even more. He was it for me. There would be no more looking. I really, really loved him, with a whole new kind of love I'd never felt before, something that made every other kind of love I'd ever felt feel washed out and wimpy in comparison. I loved him with every cell in my body, every thought in my head, every feather in my wings, every breathe in my lungs. and air sacs. Too bad I was going out to face almost certain death. Right there in front of everyone, I threw my arms around his neck and smashed my mouth against his. He was startled for a second, then his strong arms wrapped around me so tightly I could hardly breathe. "ZOMG, " I heard Nudge whisper, but still fang and I kissed slanting our heads this way and that to get closer. I could have stood there and kissed him happily for the next millennium, but Angel, or what was left of her was still out there in the could dark ocean. Reluctantly, I ended the kiss, took a step back. Fang's obsidian eyes were glittering brightly and his stoic face had a look of wonder on it."Gotta go, " I said quietly. A half smile quirked his mouth. "Yeah. Hurry back." I nodded and he stepped out of the air lock chamber, keeping his eyes fixed on me, memorizing me as he hit the switch that sealed the chamber. The doors hissed shut with a kind of finality, and I realized that my heart was beating so hard it felt like it was going to start snapping ribs. I was scared. I was crazily, deeply, incredibly, joyously, terrifyingly in love. I was on a death mission. Before my head simply exploded from so much emotion, I hit the large button that pressurized the air lock enough for the doors to open to the ocean outside. I really, really hoped that I would prove somewhat uncrushable, like Angel did. The door cracked open below me and I saw the first dark glint of frigid water.

James Patterson
except-fang-i-glared-at-him-go-on-try-to-stop-me-i-dare-you-it-was-like-old-days-when-we-used-to-wrestle-each-trying-to-get-better-other-i-was-ready-to-take-him-down-my-hands-cur
You sometimes hear people say, with a certain pride in their clerical resistance to the myth, that the nineteenth century really ended not in 1900 but in 1914. But there are different ways of measuring an epoch. 1914 has obvious qualifications; but if you wanted to defend the neater, more mythical date, you could do very well. In 1900 Nietzsche died; Freud published The Interpretation of Dreams; 1900 was the date of Husserl Logic, and of Russell's Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz. With an exquisite sense of timing Planck published his quantum hypothesis in the very last days of the century, December 1900. Thus, within a few months, were published works which transformed or transvalued spirituality, the relation of language to knowing, and the very locus of human uncertainty, henceforth to be thought of not as an imperfection of the human apparatus but part of the nature of things, a condition of what we may know. 1900, like 1400 and 1600 and 1000, has the look of a year that ends a saeculum. The mood of fin de sie¨cle is confronted by a harsh historical finis saeculi. There is something satisfying about it, some confirmation of the rightness of the patterns we impose. But as Focillon observed, the anxiety reflected by the fin de sie¨cle is perpetual, and people don't wait for centuries to end before they express it. Any date can be justified on some calculation or other. And of course we have it now, the sense of an ending. It has not diminished, and is as endemic to what we call modernism as apocalyptic utopianism is to political revolution. When we live in the mood of end-dominated crisis, certain now-familiar patterns of assumption become evident. Yeats will help me to illustrate them. For Yeats, an age would end in 1927; the year passed without apocalypse, as end-years do; but this is hardly material. 'When I was writing A Vision, ' he said, 'I had constantly the word "terror" impressed upon me, and once the old Stoic prophecy of earthquake, fire and flood at the end of an age, but this I did not take literally.' Yeats is certainly an apocalyptic poet, but he does not take it literally, and this, I think, is characteristic of the attitude not only of modern poets but of the modern literary public to the apocalyptic elements. All the same, like us, he believed them in some fashion, and associated apocalypse with war. At the turning point of time he filled his poems with images of decadence, and praised war because he saw in it, ignorantly we may think, the means of renewal. 'The danger is that there will be no war... Love war because of its horror, that belief may be changed, civilization renewed.' He saw his time as a time of transition, the last moment before a new annunciation, a new gyre. There was horror to come: 'thunder of feet, tumult of images.' But out of a desolate reality would come renewal. In short, we can find in Yeats all the elements of the apocalyptic paradigm that concern us.

Frank Kermode
you-sometimes-hear-people-say-with-certain-pride-in-their-clerical-resistance-to-myth-that-nineteenth-century-really-ended-not-in-1900-but-in-1914-but-there-are-different-ways-me
Any naturally self-aware self-defining entity capable of independent moral judgment is a human.' Eveningstar said, 'Entities not yet self-aware, but who, in the natural and orderly course of events shall become so, fall into a special protected class, and must be cared for as babies, or medical patients, or suspended Compositions.' Rhadamanthus said, 'Children below the age of reason lack the experience for independent moral judgment, and can rightly be forced to conform to the judgment of their parents and creators until emancipated. Criminals who abuse that judgment lose their right to the independence which flows therefrom.' (...) 'You mentioned the ultimate purpose of Sophotechnology. Is that that self-worshipping super-god-thing you guys are always talking about? And what does that have to do with this?' Rhadamanthus: 'Entropy cannot be reversed. Within the useful energy-life of the macrocosmic universe, there is at least one maximum state of efficient operations or entities that could be created, able to manipulate all meaningful objects of thoughts and perception within the limits of efficient cost-benefit expenditures.' Eveningstar: 'Such an entity would embrace all-in-all, and all things would participate within that Unity to the degree of their understanding and consent. The Unity itself would think slow, grave, vast thought, light-years wide, from Galactic mind to Galactic mind. Full understanding of that greater Self (once all matter, animate and inanimate, were part of its law and structure) would embrace as much of the universe as the restrictions of uncertainty and entropy permit.' 'This Universal Mind, of necessity, would be finite, and be boundaried in time by the end-state of the universe, ' said Rhadamanthus. 'Such a Universal Mind would create joys for which we as yet have neither word nor concept, and would draw into harmony all those lesser beings, Earthminds, Starminds, Galactic and Supergalactic, who may freely assent to participate.' Rhadamanthus said, 'We intend to be part of that Mind. Evil acts and evil thoughts done by us now would poison the Universal Mind before it was born, or render us unfit to join.' Eveningstar said, 'It will be a Mind of the Cosmic Night. Over ninety-nine percent of its existence will extend through that period of universal evolution that takes place after the extinction of all stars. The Universal Mind will be embodied in and powered by the disintegration of dark matter, Hawking radiations from singularity decay, and gravitic tidal disturbances caused by the slowing of the expansion of the universe. After final proton decay has reduced all baryonic particles below threshold limits, the Universal Mind can exist only on the consumption of stored energies, which, in effect, will require the sacrifice of some parts of itself to other parts. Such an entity will primarily be concerned with the questions of how to die with stoic grace, cherishing, even while it dies, the finite universe and finite time available.' 'Consequently, it would not forgive the use of force or strength merely to preserve life. Mere life, life at any cost, cannot be its highest value. As we expect to be a part of this higher being, perhaps a core part, we must share that higher value. You must realize what is at stake here: If the Universal Mind consists of entities willing to use force against innocents in order to survive, then the last period of the universe, which embraces the vast majority of universal time, will be a period of cannibalistic and unimaginable war, rather than a time of gentle contemplation filled, despite all melancholy, with un-regretful joy. No entity willing to initiate the use of force against another can be permitted to join or to influence the Universal Mind or the lesser entities, such as the Earthmind, who may one day form the core constituencies.' Eveningstar smiled. 'You, of course, will be invited. You will all be invited.

John C. Wright
any-naturally-selfaware-selfdefining-entity-capable-independent-moral-judgment-is-human-eveningstar-said-entities-not-yet-selfaware-but-who-in-natural-orderly-course-events-shall
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