Vestige Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
a-vestige-of-the-thoughts-that-once-i-had
im-not-going-to-sit-here-now-say-do-this-do-that-but-you-must-must-expunge-any-vestige-racism
black-holes-are-last-vestige-civilizations-obsessed-with-tinkering-kane-freeman
the-existence-soldier-next-to-capital-punishment-is-most-grievous-vestige-barbarism-which-survives-among-men-alfred-de-vigny
for-if-darkness-corruption-leave-a-vestige-thoughts-that-once-i-had-better-by-far-you-should-forget-smile-than-that-you-should-remember-be-sad-christina-rossetti
curious-how-love-destroys-every-vestige-that-politeness-which-human-race-in-its-years-evolution-has-painfully-acquired-stella-gibbons
im-trying-to-eliminate-every-vestige-my-own-personality-style-approach-get-into-somebody-elses-skin-sometimes-i-feel-ive-accomplished-it-but-when-i-dont-im-nobody-at-all-having-l
the-spiritual-sense-our-place-in-nature-can-be-traced-to-origins-human-civilization-the-last-vestige-organized-goddess-worship-was-eliminated-by-al-gore
no-nude-however-abstract-should-fail-to-arouse-in-spectator-some-vestige-erotic-feeling-even-if-it-be-only-faintest-shadow-if-it-does-not-do-it-kenneth-clark
if-i-live-to-be-old-enough-i-may-sit-down-under-some-bush-last-left-in-utilitarian-world-feel-thankful-that-intellect-in-its-march-has-spared-one-thomas-cole
bodily-passion-which-has-been-unjustly-decried-compels-its-victims-to-display-every-vestige-that-is-in-them-unselfishness-generosity-effectively-that-they-shine-resplendent-in-ey
her-young-soul-felt-cut-up-like-fiftyyearold-like-squirrel-that-appeared-content-but-carried-scars-from-vestige-time-in-its-black-gray-grooves-meghna-pant
its-time-to-resist-efforts-american-civil-liberties-union-who-have-conducted-religious-lobotomy-on-this-country-seeking-to-strip-it-any-vestige-cal-thomas
This century will be called Darwin's century. He was one of the greatest men who ever touched this globe. He has explained more of the phenomena of life than all of the religious teachers. Write the name of Charles Darwin on the one hand and the name of every theologian who ever lived on the other, and from that name has come more light to the world than from all of those. His doctrine of evolution, his doctrine of the survival of the fittest, his doctrine of the origin of species, has removed in every thinking mind the last vestige of orthodox Christianity. He has not only stated, but he has demonstrated, that the inspired writer knew nothing of this world, nothing of the origin of man, nothing of geology, nothing of astronomy, nothing of nature; that the Bible is a book written by ignorance-at the instigation of fear. Think of the men who replied to him. Only a few years ago there was no person too ignorant to successfully answer Charles Darwin, and the more ignorant he was the more cheerfully he undertook the task. He was held up to the ridicule, the scorn and contempt of the Christian world, and yet when he died, England was proud to put his dust with that of her noblest and her grandest. Charles Darwin conquered the intellectual world, and his doctrines are now accepted facts. His light has broken in on some of the clergy, and the greatest man who to-day occupies the pulpit of one of the orthodox churches, Henry Ward Beecher, is a believer in the theories of Charles Darwin-a man of more genius than all the clergy of that entire church put together... The church teaches that man was created perfect, and that for six thousand years he has degenerated. Darwin demonstrated the falsity of this dogma. He shows that man has for thousands of ages steadily advanced; that the Garden of Eden is an ignorant myth; that the doctrine of original sin has no foundation in fact; that the atonement is an absurdity; that the serpent did not tempt, and that man did not 'fall.' Charles Darwin destroyed the foundation of orthodox Christianity. There is nothing left but faith in what we know could not and did not happen. Religion and science are enemies. One is a superstition; the other is a fact. One rests upon the false, the other upon the true. One is the result of fear and faith, the other of investigation and reason.

Robert G. Ingersoll
this-century-will-be-called-darwins-century-he-was-one-greatest-men-who-ever-touched-this-globe-he-has-explained-more-phenomena-life-than-all-religious-teachers-write-name-charle
Conceive a world-society developed materially far beyond the wildest dreams of America. Unlimited power, derived partly from the artificial disintegration of atoms, partly from the actual annihilation of matter through the union of electrons and protons to form radiation, completely abolished the whole grotesque burden of drudgery which hitherto had seemed the inescapable price of civilization, nay of life itself. The vast economic routine of the world-community was carried on by the mere touching of appropriate buttons. Transport, mining, manufacture, and even agriculture were performed in this manner. And indeed in most cases the systematic co-ordination of these activities was itself the work of self-regulating machinery. Thus, not only was there no longer need for any human beings to spend their lives in unskilled monotonous labour, but further, much that earlier races would have regarded as highly skilled though stereotyped work, was now carried on by machinery. Only the pioneering of industry, the endless exhilarating research, invention, design and reorganization, which is incurred by an ever-changing society, still engaged the minds of men and women. And though this work was of course immense, it could not occupy the whole attention of a great world-community. Thus very much of the energy of the race was free to occupy itself with other no less difficult and exacting matters, or to seek recreation in its many admirable sports and arts. Materially every individual was a multi-millionaire, in that he had at his beck and call a great diversity of powerful mechanisms; but also he was a penniless friar, for he had no vestige of economic control over any other human being. He could fly through the upper air to the ends of the earth in an hour, or hang idle among the clouds all day long. His flying machine was no cumbersome aeroplane, but either a wingless aerial boat, or a mere suit of overalls in which he could disport himself with the freedom of a bird. Not only in the air, but in the sea also, he was free. He could stroll about the ocean bed, or gambol with the deep-sea fishes. And for habitation he could make his home, as he willed, either in a shack in the wilderness or in one of the great pylons which dwarfed the architecture even of the American age. He could possess this huge palace in loneliness and fill it with his possessions, to be automatically cared for without human service; or he could join with others and create a hive of social life. All these amenities he took for granted as the savage takes for granted the air which he breathes. And because they were as universally available as air, no one craved them in excess, and no one grudged another the use of them.

Olaf Stapledon
conceive-worldsociety-developed-materially-far-beyond-wildest-dreams-america-unlimited-power-derived-partly-from-artificial-disintegration-atoms-partly-from-actual-annihilation-m
?Earn cash when you save a quote by clicking
EARNED Load...
LEVEL : Load...