Amusements Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
life-would-be-tolerable-but-for-its-amusements
most-amusements-only-mean-trying-to-win-another-persons-money-rudyard-kipling
let-us-read-let-us-dance-two-amusements-that-will-never-do-any-harm-to-world-voltaire
the-real-character-man-is-found-out-by-his-amusements
let-us-read-let-us-dance-these-two-amusements-will-never-do-any-harm-to-world-voltaire
the-real-character-man-is-found-out-by-his-amusements-joshua-reynolds
what-a-pity-it-is-that-we-have-no-amusements-in-england-but-vice-and-religion
happiness-does-not-consist-in-pastimes-amusements-but-in-virtuous-activities-aristotle
a-am-a-great-friend-of-public-amusements-they-keep-people-from-vice
i-wish-to-emphasize-fact-that-our-homes-should-be-more-attractive-that-more-our-amusements-should-be-in-home-instead-streets-david-o-mckay
the-amusements-life-he-argued-should-be-accepted-with-same-philosophy-as-its-ills-the-striding-place-gertrude-atherton
we-ought-never-to-sport-with-pain-distress-in-any-our-amusements-treat-even-meanest-insect-with-wanton-cruelty-hugh-blair
if-those-who-are-enemies-innocent-amusements-had-direction-world-they-would-take-away-spring-youth-former-from-year-latter-from-human-life-honore-de-balzac
ordinary-people-simply-dont-know-what-books-mean-to-us-shut-up-here-reading-learning-radio-are-our-amusements-anne-frank
one-amusements-idleness-is-reading-without-fatigue-close-attention-world-therefore-swarms-with-writers-whose-wish-is-not-to-be-studied-but-to-be-samuel-johnson
if-you-are-animated-by-right-principles-are-fully-awakened-to-true-dignity-life-subject-amusements-may-be-left-to-settle-itself-thornton-t-munger
when-we-hear-people-talk-riches-honors-amusements-world-let-us-remember-that-all-things-have-end-let-us-then-say-my-god-i-wish-for-you-alone-alphonsus-liguori
this-is-perfect-example-how-entirely-out-hand-women-in-this-country-have-gotten-you-act-like-men-arent-anything-more-than-extraneous-amusements-little-toys-to-keep-you-entertaine
any-reading-not-vicious-species-must-be-good-substitute-for-amusements-too-apt-to-fill-up-leisure-labouring-classes-james-madison
every-man-is-rich-poor-according-to-degree-in-which-he-can-afford-to-enjoy-necessaries-conveniences-amusements-human-life-adam-smith
newton-took-no-exercise-indulged-in-no-amusements-worked-incessantly-often-spending-eighteen-nineteen-hours-out-twentyfour-in-writing-ww-rouse-ball
the-great-business-man-is-to-improve-his-mind-govern-his-manners-all-other-projects-pursuits-whether-in-our-power-to-compass-not-are-only-pliny-elder
towards-my-husband-i-often-fail-to-show-interest-in-his-affairs-amusements-not-rousing-myself-to-respond-when-im-tired-concerned-with-other-things-forgetting-he-is-patient-with-m
young-ladies-who-think-nothing-but-dress-public-amusements-forming-what-they-call-high-connexions-are-undoubtedly-most-easily-managed-by-fear-what-maria-edgeworth
society-has-been-able-to-create-refuges-every-sort-for-since-it-preferred-to-take-lovelife-as-amusement-it-also-had-to-give-it-easy-form-cheap-safe-rainer-maria-rilke
if-god-bores-you-tell-him-that-he-bores-you-that-you-prefer-vilest-amusements-to-his-presence-that-you-only-feel-at-your-ease-when-you-are-far-from-francois-fenelon
i-wish-that-i-could-marshall-all-young-to-appreciation-fact-that-you-have-earnest-work-in-life-your-amusements-recreations-are-only-to-help-you-thomas-de-witt-talmage
opinions-mens-thoughts-about-great-subjects-taste-their-thoughts-about-small-ones-dress-behavior-amusements-ornaments-george-eliot
i-am-overachieving-at-aimlessness-i-am-typea-alphagirl-lollygagger-leader-gang-heartbroken-kids-running-wild-across-this-lonely-strip-amusements-each-us-smarting-from-betrayals-l
on-sir-joshua-reynoldss-observing-that-real-character-man-was-found-out-by-his-amusements-yes-sir-no-man-is-hypocrite-in-his-pleasures-samuel-johnson
i-believe-that-entertainment-amusements-are-work-enemy-to-keep-dying-men-from-knowing-theyre-dying-to-keep-enemies-god-from-remembering-that-theyre-enemies-aw-tozer
if-work-art-is-placed-before-me-i-believe-i-can-enjoy-it-but-i-do-not-overlook-fact-that-art-is-one-thing-another-thing-amusement-that-people-do-george-henry-lewes
illusions-are-certainly-expensive-amusements-but-destruction-illusions-is-still-more-expensive-if-looked-upon-as-amusement-as-it-undoubtedly-is-by-friedrich-nietzsche
vous-craignez-les-livres-comme-certaines-bourgades-ont-craint-les-violons-laissez-lire-et-laissez-danser-ces-deux-amusements-ne-feront-jamais-de-mal-au-monde-voltaire
Without conversion of heart we cannot serve God on earth. We have naturally neither faith, nor fear, nor love, toward God and His Son Jesus Christ. We have no delight in His Word. We take no pleasure in prayer or communion with Him. We have no enjoyment in His ordinances, His house, His people, or His day. We may have a form of Christianity, and keep up a round of ceremonies and religious performances. But without conversion we have no more heart in our religion than a brick or a stone. Can a dead corpse serve God? We know it cannot. Well, without conversion we are dead toward God. Look round the congregation with which you worship every Sunday. Mark how little interest the great majority of them take in what is going on. Observe how listless, and apathetic, and indifferent, they evidently are about the whole affair. It is clear their hearts are not there! They are thinking of something else, and not of religion. They are thinking of business, or money, or pleasure, or worldly plans, or bonnets, or gowns, or new dresses, or amusements. Their bodies are there, but not their hearts. And what is the reason? What is it they all need? They need conversion. Without it they only come to church for fashion and form's sake, and go away from church to serve the world or their sins. But this is not all. Without conversion of heart we could not enjoy heaven, if we got there. Heaven is a place where holiness reigns supreme, and sin and the world have no place at all. The company will all be holy; the employments will all be holy; it will be an eternal Sunday. Surely if we go to heaven, we must have a heart in tune and able to enjoy it, or else we shall not be happy. We must have a nature in harmony with the element we live in, and the place where we dwell. Can a fish be happy out of water? We know it cannot. Well, without conversion of heart we could not be happy in heaven. Look round the neighborhood in which you live and the persons with whom you are acquainted. Think what many of them would do if they were cut off for ever from money, and business, and newspapers, and cards, and balls, and races, and hunting, and shopping, and worldly amusements! Would they like it? Think what they would feel if they were shut up forever with Jesus Christ, and saints, and angels! Would they be happy? Would the eternal company of Moses, and David, and St. Paul be pleasant to those who never take the trouble to read what those holy men wrote? Would heaven's everlasting praise suit the taste of those who can hardly spare a few minutes in a week for private religion, even for prayer? There is but one answer to be given to all these questions. We must be converted before we can enjoy heaven. Heaven would be no heaven to any child of Adam without conversion. Let no man deceive us. There are two things which are of absolute necessity to the salvation of every man and woman on earth. One of them is the mediatorial work of Christ for us, His atonement, satisfaction, and intercession. The other is the converting work of the Spirit in us, His guiding, renewing, and sanctifying grace. We must have both a title and a heart for heaven. Sacraments are only generally necessary to salvation: a man may be saved without them, like the penitent thief. An interest in Christ and conversion are absolutely necessary: without them no one can possibly be saved. All, all alike, high or low, rich or poor, old or young, gentle or simple, churchmen or dissenters, baptized or unbaptized, all must be converted or perish.

J.C. Ryle
without-conversion-heart-we-cannot-serve-god-on-earth-we-have-naturally-neither-faith-nor-fear-nor-love-toward-god-his-son-jesus-christ-we-have-no-delight-in-his-word-we-take-no-
In our folk nobody has any experience of youth, there's barely even any time for being a toddler. The children simply don't have any time in which they might be children... Indeed... there's simply no way that we would be able to provide our children with a viable childhood, one that is real. Naturally, there are consequences. There's a certain ever present, not to be liquidated childishness that permeates our folk; We often act in ways that are totally and utterly ridiculous and, indeed, precisely like children we do things that are crazy, letting loose with our assets in a manner that is bereft of all rationality, prodigious in our celebrations, partaking in a light-headed frivolousness that is divorced from all sensibility, and often enough all simply for the sake of some small token of fun, so much do we love having our small amusements. But our folk isn't only childish, to a certain extent we also age prematurely, childhood and old age mix themselves differently with us than by others. We don't have any youth, we jump right away into maturity and, then, we remain grown-ups for too long and as a consequence to this there's a broad shadow of a certain tiredness and a sort of hopelessness that colours our essential nature, a nature that as a whole is otherwise so tenacious and permeated by hope, strong hope. This, no doubt, this is related to why we're so disinclined toward music-we're too old for music, so much excitement, so much passion doesn't sit well with our heaviness;

Franz Kafka
in-our-folk-nobody-has-any-experience-youth-theres-barely-even-any-time-for-being-toddler-the-children-simply-dont-have-any-time-in-which-they-might-be-children-indeed-theres-sim
Hold childhood in reverence, and do not be in any hurry to judge it for good or ill. Leave exceptional cases to show themselves, let their qualities be tested and confirmed, before special methods are adopted. Give nature time to work before you take over her business, lest you interfere with her dealings. You assert that you know the value of time and are afraid to waste it. You fail to perceive that it is a greater waste of time to use it ill than to do nothing, and that a child ill taught is further from virtue than a child who has learnt nothing at all. You are afraid to see him spending his early years doing nothing. What! is it nothing to be happy, nothing to run and jump all day? He will never be so busy again all his life long. Plato, in his Republic, which is considered so stern, teaches the children only through festivals, games, songs, and amusements. It seems as if he had accomplished his purpose when he had taught them to be happy; and Seneca, speaking of the Roman lads in olden days, says, "They were always on their feet, they were never taught anything which kept them sitting." Were they any the worse for it in manhood? Do not be afraid, therefore, of this so-called idleness. What would you think of a man who refused to sleep lest he should waste part of his life? You would say, "He is mad; he is not enjoying his life, he is robbing himself of part of it; to avoid sleep he is hastening his death." Remember that these two cases are alike, and that childhood is the sleep of reason. The apparent ease with which children learn is their ruin. You fail to see that this very facility proves that they are not learning. Their shining, polished brain reflects, as in a mirror, the things you show them, but nothing sinks in. The child remembers the words and the ideas are reflected back; his hearers understand them, but to him they are meaningless. Although memory and reason are wholly different faculties, the one does not really develop apart from the other. Before the age of reason the child receives images, not ideas; and there is this difference between them: images are merely the pictures of external objects, while ideas are notions about those objects determined by their relations.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau
hold-childhood-in-reverence-do-not-be-in-any-hurry-to-judge-it-for-good-ill-leave-exceptional-cases-to-show-themselves-let-their-qualities-be-tested-confirmed-before-special-meth
All human life, we may say, consists solely of these two activities: (1) bringing one's activities into harmony with conscience, or (2) hiding from oneself the indications of conscience in order to be able to continue to live as before. Some do the first, others the second. To attain the first there is but one means: moral enlightenment - the increase of light in oneself and attention to what it shows. To attain the second - to hide from oneself the indications of conscience-there are two means: one external and the other internal. The external means consists in occupations that divert one's attention from the indications given by conscience; the internal method consists in darkening conscience itself. As a man has two ways of avoiding seeing an object that is before him: either by diverting his sight to other more striking objects, or by obstructing the sight of his own eyes-just so a man can hide from himself the indications of conscience in two ways: either by the external method of diverting his attention to various occupations, cares, amusements, or games; or by the internal method of obstructing the organ of attention itself. For people of dull, limited moral feeling, the external diversions are often quite sufficient to enable them not to perceive the indications conscience gives of the wrongness of their lives. But for morally sensitive people those means are often insufficient. The external means do not quite divert attention from the consciousness of discord between one's life and the demands of conscience. This consciousness hampers one's life; and in order to be able to go on living as before, people have recourse to the reliable, internal method, which is that of darkening conscience itself by poisoning the brain with stupefying substances. One is not living as conscience demands, yet lacks the strength to reshape one's life in accord with its demands. The diversions which might distract attention from the consciousness of this discord are insufficient, or have become stale, and so-in order to be able to live on, disregarding the indications conscience gives of the wrongness of their life-people (by poisoning it temporarily) stop the activity of the organ through which conscience manifests itself, as a man by covering his eyes hides from himself what he does not wish to see.

Leo Tolstoy
all-human-life-we-may-say-consists-solely-these-two-activities-1-bringing-ones-activities-into-harmony-with-conscience-2-hiding-from-oneself-indications-conscience-in-order-to-be
To begin with, there is the frightful debauchery of taste that has already been effected by a century of mechanisation. This is almost too obvious and too generally admitted to need pointing out. But as a single instance, take taste in its narrowest sense - the taste for decent food. In the highly mechanical countries, thanks to tinned food, cold storage, synthetic flavouring matters, etc., the palate it almost a dead organ. As you can see by looking at any greengrocer's shop, what the majority of English people mean by an apple is a lump of highly-coloured cotton wool from America or Australia; they will devour these things, apparently with pleasure, and let the English apples rot under the trees. It is the shiny, standardized, machine-made look of the American apple that appeals to them; the superior taste of the English apple is something they simply do not notice. Or look at the factory-made, foil wrapped cheeses and 'blended' butter in an grocer's; look at the hideous rows of tins which usurp more and more of the space in any food-shop, even a dairy; look at a sixpenny Swiss roll or a twopenny ice-cream; look at the filthy chemical by-product that people will pour down their throats under the name of beer. Wherever you look you will see some slick machine-made article triumphing over the old-fashioned article that still tastes of something other than sawdust. And what applies to food applies also to furniture, houses, clothes, books, amusements and everything else that makes up our environment. These are now millions of people, and they are increasing every year, to whom the blaring of a radio is not only a more acceptable but a more normal background to their thoughts than the lowing of cattle or the song of birds. The mechanisation of the world could never proceed very far while taste, even the taste-buds of the tongue, remained uncorrupted, because in that case most of the products of the machine would be simply unwanted. In a healthy world there would be no demand for tinned food, aspirins, gramophones, gas-pipe chairs, machine guns, daily newspapers, telephones, motor-cars, etc. etc.; and on the other hand there would be a constant demand for the things the machine cannot produce. But meanwhile the machine is here, and its corrupting effects are almost irresistible. One inveighs against it, but one goes on using it. Even a bare-arse savage, given the change, will learn the vices of civilisation within a few months. Mechanisation leads to the decay of taste, the decay of taste leads to demand for machine-made articles and hence to more mechanisation, and so a vicious circle is established.

George Orwell
to-begin-with-there-is-frightful-debauchery-taste-that-has-already-been-effected-by-century-mechanisation-this-is-almost-too-obvious-too-generally-admitted-to-need-pointing-out-b
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