Confluence Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
i-think-60s-were-extraordinary-time-i-feel-bad-for-kids-today-who-missed-this-wonderful-confluence-which-was-simultaneously-confluence-global-peter-coyote
is-not-every-meanest-day-confluence-two-eternities-thomas-carlyle
health-care-its-going-to-be-political-its-going-to-be-lets-say-confluence-politics-messy-implementation-mark-shields
its-combination-melody-lyrics-not-one-without-other-its-confluence-these-different-elements-that-makes-something-powerful
it-was-fortunate-moment-in-history-that-i-happened-to-be-in-there-was-confluence-internet-all-this-other-stuff-that-i-was-able-to-capitalize-on-jeff-vespa
a-small-kindness-confluence-compassion-had-saved-his-life-was-that-strength-weakness-jacqueline-carey
a-notion-for-story-is-for-me-confluence-real-events-historical-perhaps-from-my-own-memory-to-create-exciting-fusion-michael-morpurgo
the-english-inn-stands-permanently-planted-at-confluence-roads-history-memory-romance-martha-grimes
explore-your-untamed-dreams-you-just-might-find-unique-place-where-confluence-paths-lead-towards-your-destiny-kathy-goodhew
the-irritating-question-they-ask-us-us-being-writers-is-where-do-you-get-your-ideas-and-answer-is-confluence-things-come-together-the-right-ingredients-suddenly-abracadabra-neil-
never-before-in-modern-times-has-much-world-been-simultaneously-hit-by-confluence-economic-financial-turmoil-such-as-we-are-now-living-through
never-before-in-modern-times-has-much-world-been-simultaneously-hit-by-confluence-economic-financial-turmoil-such-as-we-are-now-living-through-timothy-geithner
by-numbers-by-all-official-records-here-at-confluence-history-racism-poverty-economic-power-this-is-what-our-lives-are-worth-nothing-jesmyn-ward
people-adopt-ideas-when-social-personal-financial-trends-intersect-confluence-that-may-seem-random-but-usually-happens-by-design-clement-mok
we-are-not-being-arrogant-complacent-when-we-are-said-that-our-country-as-united-nation-has-never-in-its-entire-history-enjoyed-such-confluence-thabo-mbeki
amazing-how-confluence-praise-lust-can-just-make-your-defensive-barriers-collapse-like-jello-on-hot-stove-dan-skinner
i-related-to-whole-hippie-acid-test-confluence-early-internet-the-idea-that-we-should-be-open-interoperate-with-our-data-resonated-with-me
what-amplifies-transformational-power-ahead-is-confluence-two-major-technological-currents-today-universal-access-to-mobile-computing-pervasive-use-social-networks
it-was-even-said-that-some-birds-spring-to-life-in-tension-accidental-chords-being-struck-in-ether-confluence-arbitrary-sound-waves-from-unrelated-sources-piano-truck-breaking-bo
i-quit-eating-meat-in-1976-same-year-i-turned-fifteen-came-out-went-to-my-first-gay-rights-rally-not-in-that-order-when-i-say-that-i-came-out-i-mean-that-i-resolved-to-never-lie-
It was one of those rare moments where one has a vision of the scope of the wild ocean. Not just small cylinders firing to keep a tiny engine running, but rather the giant, massive gears of nature, each one with its own reasoning, its own meta-logic, spinning in its particular circle in competition or in confluence with the gear below it. We zeroed in on the school, but our progress was painfully slow, It would have been foolish to speed into the tumult-we would have ruined our baits in the process and doomed our chances of hooking a tuna. But luckily, the commotion did not subside. If anything it only grew more frantic and exhuberant on our approach. Beneath the birds, beneath the dolphins, beneath the menhaden, there should have been an equally vast school of giant bluefin tuna, collaborating with vertebrates of the so-called higher orders of life to form the floor of the prey trap, sealing the baitfish in from below, while the dolphins and birds made up the trap's walls and ceiling. A strike from a giant tuna seemed inevitable...as the boat moved forward, I saw seabirds gathering up ahead into a cloud, the size and violence of which I had never seen before. Gannets - big, albatross-like pelagic birds - flew hundreds of feet above the churning surface of the water. In a flock of many thousands, they whirled in unison and then, as if on command from some brigadier general of bird life, dropped in an arc, bird after bird, into the water beneath. The gyre of gannets turned in a clockwise direction, and down below, spinning counterclockwise, was the largest school of dolphins I'd ever seen. There in the angry blue-green sea, the dolphins had corralled a vast school of menhaden-small herringlike creatures that, when bitten, release globules of oil that float on the surface. Oil slicks flattened the water everywhere as the dolphins swirled around, using their exceptional intelligence and wolf-pack cooperation to befuddle and surround the fish, which in turn whirled in a clockwise direction.

Paul Greenberg
it-was-one-those-rare-moments-where-one-has-vision-scope-wild-ocean-not-just-small-cylinders-firing-to-keep-tiny-engine-running-but-rather-giant-massive-gears-nature-each-one-wit
Old Hubert must have had a premonition of his squalid demise. In October he said to me, 'Forty-two years I've had this place. I'd really like to go back home, but I ain't got the energy since my old girl died. And I can't sell it the way it is now. But anyway before I hang my hat up I'd be curious to know what's in that third cellar of mine.' The third cellar has been walled up by order of the civil defence authorities after the floods of 1910. A double barrier of cemented bricks prevents the rising waters from invading the upper floors when flooding occurs. In the event of storms or blocked drains, the cellar acts as a regulatory overflow. The weather was fine: no risk of drowning or any sudden emergency. There were five of us: Hubert, Gerard the painter, two regulars and myself. Old Marteau, the local builder, was upstairs with his gear, ready to repair the damage. We made a hole. Our exploration took us sixty metres down a laboriously-faced vaulted corridor (it must have been an old thoroughfare). We were wading through a disgusting sludge. At the far end, an impassable barrier of iron bars. The corridor continued beyond it, plunging downwards. In short, it was a kind of drain-trap. That's all. Nothing else. Disappointed, we retraced our steps. Old Hubert scanned the walls with his electric torch. Look! An opening. No, an alcove, with some wooden object that looks like a black statuette. I pick the thing up: it's easily removable. I stick it under my arm. I told Hubert, 'It's of no interest... ' and kept this treasure for myself. I gazed at it for hours on end, in private. So my deductions, my hunches were not mistaken: the Bie¨vre-Seine confluence was once the site where sorcerers and satanists must surely have gathered. And this kind of primitive magic, which the blacks of Central Africa practise today, was known here several centuries ago. The statuette had miraculously survived the onslaught of time: the well-known virtues of the waters of the Bie¨vre, so rich in tannin, had protected the wood from rotting, actually hardened, almost fossilized it. The object answered a purpose that was anything but aesthetic. Crudely carved, probably from heart of oak. The legs were slightly set apart, the arms detached from the body. No indication of gender. Four nails set in a triangle were planted in its chest. Two of them, corroded with rust, broke off at the wood's surface all on their own. There was a spike sunk in each eye. The skull, like a salt cellar, had twenty-four holes in which little tufts of brown hair had been planted, fixed in place with wax, of which there were still some vestiges. I've kept quiet about my find. I'm biding my time.

Jacques Yonnet
old-hubert-must-have-had-premonition-his-squalid-demise-in-october-he-said-to-me-fortytwo-years-ive-had-this-place-id-really-like-to-go-back-home-but-i-aint-got-energy-since-my-o
Almost immediately after jazz musicians arrived in Paris, they began to gather in two of the city's most important creative neighborhoods: Montmartre and Montparnasse, respectively the Right and Left Bank haunts of artists, intellectuals, poets, and musicians since the late nineteenth century. Performing in these high-profile and popular entertainment districts could give an advantage to jazz musicians because Parisians and tourists already knew to go there when they wanted to spend a night out on the town. As hubs of artistic imagination and experimentation, Montmartre and Montparnasse therefore attracted the kinds of audiences that might appreciate the new and thrilling sounds of jazz. For many listeners, these locations leant the music something of their own exciting aura, and the early success of jazz in Paris probably had at least as much to do with musicians playing there as did other factors. In spite of their similarities, however, by the 1920s these neighborhoods were on two very different paths, each representing competing visions of what France could become after the war. And the reactions to jazz in each place became important markers of the difference between the two areas and visions. Montmartre was legendary as the late-nineteenth-century capital of 'bohemian Paris, ' where French artists had gathered and cabaret songs had filled the air. In its heyday, Montmartre was one of the centers of popular entertainment, and its artists prided themselves on flying in the face of respectable middle-class values. But by the 1920s, Montmartre represented an established artistic tradition, not the challenge to bourgeois life that it had been at the fin de sie¨cle. Entertainment culture was rapidly changing both in substance and style in the postwar era, and a desire for new sounds, including foreign music and exotic art, was quickly replacing the love for the cabarets' French chansons. Jazz was not entirely to blame for such changes, of course. Commercial pressures, especially the rapidly growing tourist trade, eroded the popularity of old Montmartre cabarets, which were not always able to compete with the newer music halls and dance halls. Yet jazz bore much of the criticism from those who saw the changes in Montmartre as the death of French popular entertainment. Montparnasse, on the other hand, was the face of a modern Paris. It was the international crossroads where an ever changing mixture of people celebrated, rather than lamented, cosmopolitanism and exoticism in all its forms, especially in jazz bands. These different attitudes within the entertainment districts and their institutions reflected the impact of the broader trends at work in Paris-the influx of foreign populations, for example, or the advent of cars and electricity on city streets as indicators of modern technology-and the possible consequences for French culture. Jazz was at the confluence of these trends, and it became a convenient symbol for the struggle they represented.

Jeffrey H. Jackson
almost-immediately-after-jazz-musicians-arrived-in-paris-they-began-to-gather-in-two-citys-most-important-creative-neighborhoods-montmartre-montparnasse-respectively-right-left-b
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