Consolations Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
its-practically-my-subject-my-theme-solitude-community-weirdness-terrors-solitude-stifling-consolations-community-also-consolations-solitude-derek-mahon
hear-diligently-my-speech-and-let-this-be-your-consolations
modern-thought-does-not-offer-consolations-but-upsets-mason-cooley
it-seems-to-be-fate-man-to-seek-all-his-consolations-in-futurity
a-resistance-that-dispenses-with-consolations-is-always-stronger-than-one-which-relies-on-them-perry-anderson
the-effect-consolations-religion-may-be-compared-to-that-narcotic-sigmund-freud
are-gods-consolations-not-enough-for-you-words-spoken-gently-to-you-job-1511
one-large-consolations-for-experiencing-anything-unpleasant-is-knowledge-that-one-can-communicate-it-joyce-carol-oates
people-dont-know-consolations-being-unsuccessful-if-i-had-been-successful-i-should-have-had-no-peace-time-rumer-godden
our-soul-can-find-in-blessed-sacrament-all-joys-consolations-it-desires-teresa-avila
one-great-consolations-is-that-because-jesus-walked-such-long-lonely-path-utterly-alone-we-do-not-have-to-do-jeffrey-r-holland
how-often-god-takes-away-our-consolations-that-we-may-only-love-him-for-himself-reveals-our-sinfulness-that-we-may-better-appreciate-completeness-fb-meyer
to-express-unafraid-unashamed-what-one-really-thinks-feels-is-one-great-consolations-life-theodor-reik
it-is-one-consolations-philosophy-that-benefit-showing-how-to-dispense-with-concept-does-not-hinge-on-dispensing-with-it-willard-van-orman-quine
workmens-compensation-hours-conditions-labor-are-cold-consolations-if-there-be-no-employment-calvin-coolidge
that-ye-may-suck-and-be-satisfied-with-the-breasts-of-her-consolations-that-ye-may-milk-out-and-be-delighted-with-the-abundance-of-her-glory
our-dependence-upon-god-ought-to-be-entire-absolute-that-we-should-never-think-it-necessary-in-any-kind-distress-to-have-recourse-to-human-thomas-kempis
the-creative-consequences-mans-imaginative-strivings-may-never-make-him-whole-but-they-constitute-his-deepest-consolations-his-greatest-glories-anthony-storr
i-still-occasionally-need-to-struggle-but-i-now-fear-it-less-the-weapons-i-fight-it-with-are-also-my-consolations-books-music-food-wine-nature-p-d-james
unless-we-form-habit-going-to-bible-in-bright-moments-as-well-as-in-trouble-we-cannot-fully-respond-to-its-consolations-because-we-lack-equilibrium-helen-keller
christianity-in-particular-should-be-dubbed-great-treasurechamber-ingenious-consolations-such-store-refreshing-soothing-deadening-drugs-has-it-friedrich-nietzsche
what-unthankfulness-is-it-to-forget-our-consolations-to-look-upon-matters-grievance-to-think-much-upon-two-three-crosses-as-to-forget-hundred-richard-sibbes
are-the-consolations-of-god-small-with-thee-is-there-any-secret-thing-with-thee
there-is-in-us-lyric-germ-nucleus-which-deserves-respect-it-bids-man-to-ponder-create-in-this-dim-corner-himself-he-can-take-refuge-find-consolations-which-society-his-fellow-cre
talk-to-me-about-truth-religion-ill-listen-gladly-talk-to-me-about-duty-religion-ill-listen-submissively-but-dont-come-talking-to-me-about-consolations-religion-i-shall-suspect-t
But the Esquire passage I found most poignant and revealing was this one: Mister Rogers' visit to a teenage boy severely afflicted with cerebral palsy and terrible anger. One of the boys' few consolations in life, Junod wrote, was watching Mister Rogers Neighborhood. 'At first, the boy was made very nervous by the thought that Mister Rogers was visiting him. He was so nervous, in fact, that when Mister Rogers did visit, he got mad at himself and began hating himself and hitting himself, and his mother had to take him to another room and talk to him. Mister Rogers didn't leave, though. He wanted something from the boy, and Mister Rogers never leaves when he wants something from somebody. He just waited patiently, and when the boy came back, Mister Rogers talked to him, and then he made his request. He said, 'I would like you to do something for me. Would you do something for me?' On his computer, the boy answered yes, of course, he would do anything for Mister Rogers, so then Mister Rogers said: I would like you to pray for me. Will you pray for me?' And now the boy didn't know how to respond. He was thunderstruck... because nobody had ever asked him for something like that, ever. The boy had always been prayed for. The boy had always been the object of prayer, and now he was being asked to pray for Mister Rogers, and although at first he didn't know how to do it, he said he would, he said he'd try, and ever since then he keeps Mister Rogers in his prayers and doesn't talk about wanting to die anymore, because he figures if Mister Rogers likes him, that must mean that God likes him, too. As for Mister Rogers himself... he doesn't look at the story the same way the boy did or I did. In fact, when Mister Rogers first told me the story, I complimented him on being smart - for knowing that asking the boy for his prayers would make the boy feel better about himself - and Mister Rogers responded by looking at me first with puzzlement and then with surprise. 'Oh heavens no, Tom! I didn't ask him for his prayers for him; I asked for me. I asked him because I think that anyone who has gone through challenges like that must be very close to God. I asked him because I wanted his intercession.

Tim Madigan
but-esquire-passage-i-found-most-poignant-revealing-was-this-one-mister-rogers-visit-to-teenage-boy-severely-afflicted-with-cerebral-palsy-terrible-anger-one-boys-few-consolation
Cheap grace means grace sold on the market like cheapjacks' wares. The sacraments, the forgiveness of sin, and the consolations of religion are thrown away at cut prices. Grace is represented as the Church's inexhaustible treasury, from which she showers blessings with generous hands, without asking questions or fixing limits. Grace without price; grace without cost! The essence of grace, we suppose, is that the account has been paid in advance; and, because it has been paid, everything can be had for nothing. Since the cost was infinite, the possibilities of using and spending it are infinite. What would grace be if it were not cheap?... Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession, absolution without personal confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate. Costly grace is the treasure hidden in the field; for the sake of it a man will go and sell all that he has. It is the pearl of great price to buy which the merchant will sell all his goods. It is the kingly rule of Christ, for whose sake a man will pluck out the eye which causes him to stumble; it is the call of Jesus Christ at which the disciple leaves his nets and follows him. Costly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again, the gift which must be asked for, the door at which a man must knock. Such grace is costly because it calls us to follow, and it is grace because it calls us to follow Jesus Christ. It is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life. It is costly because it condemns sin, and grace because it justifies the sinner. Above all, it is costly because it cost God the life of his Son: "ye were bought at a price, " and what has cost God much cannot be cheap for us. Above all, it is grace because God did not reckon his Son too dear a price to pay for our life, but delivered him up for us. Costly grace is the Incarnation of God.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer
cheap-grace-means-grace-sold-on-market-like-cheapjacks-wares-the-sacraments-forgiveness-sin-consolations-religion-are-thrown-away-at-cut-prices-grace-is-represented-as-churchs-in
It happens that in our phase of civility, the novel is the central form of literary art. It lends itself to explanations borrowed from any intellectual system of the universe which seems at the time satisfactory. Its history is an attempt to evade the laws of what Scott called 'the land of fiction'-the stereotypes which ignore reality, and whose remoteness from it we identify as absurd. From Cervantes forward it has been, when it has satisfied us, the poetry which is 'capable, ' in the words of Ortega, 'of coping with present reality.' But it is a 'realistic poetry' and its theme is, bluntly, 'the collapse of the poetic' because it has to do with 'the barbarous, brutal, mute, meaningless reality of things.' It cannot work with the old hero, or with the old laws of the land of romance; moreover, such new laws and customs as it creates have themselves to be repeatedly broken under the demands of a changed and no less brutal reality. 'Reality has such a violent temper that it does not tolerate the ideal even when reality itself is idealized.' Nevertheless, the effort continues to be made. The extremest revolt against the customs or laws of fiction-the antinovels of Fielding or Jane Austen or Flaubert or Natalie Sarraute-creates its new laws, in their turn to be broken. Even when there is a profession of complete narrative anarchy, as in some of the works I discussed last week, or in a poem such as Paterson, which rejects as spurious whatever most of us understand as form, it seems that time will always reveal some congruence with a paradigm-provided always that there is in the work that necessary element of the customary which enables it to communicate at all. I shall not spend much time on matters so familiar to you. Whether, with Luke¡cs, you think of the novel as peculiarly the resolution of the problem of the individual in an open society-or as relating to that problem in respect of an utterly contingent world; or express this in terms of the modern French theorists and call its progress a necessary and 'unceasing movement from the known to the unknown'; or simply see the novel as resembling the other arts in that it cannot avoid creating new possibilities for its own future-however you put it, the history of the novel is the history of forms rejected or modified, by parody, manifesto, neglect, as absurd. Nowhere else, perhaps, are we so conscious of the dissidence between inherited forms and our own reality. There is at present some good discussion of the issue not only in French but in English. Here I have in mind Iris Murdoch, a writer whose persistent and radical thinking about the form has not as yet been fully reflected in her own fiction. She contrasts what she calls 'crystalline form' with narrative of the shapeless, quasi-documentary kind, rejecting the first as uncharacteristic of the novel because it does not contain free characters, and the second because it cannot satisfy that need of form which it is easier to assert than to describe; we are at least sure that it exists, and that it is not always illicit. Her argument is important and subtle, and this is not an attempt to restate it; it is enough to say that Miss Murdoch, as a novelist, finds much difficulty in resisting what she calls 'the consolations of form' and in that degree damages the 'opacity, ' as she calls it, of character. A novel has this (and more) in common with love, that it is, so to speak, delighted with its own inventions of character, but must respect their uniqueness and their freedom. It must do so without losing the formal qualities that make it a novel. But the truly imaginative novelist has an unshakable 'respect for the contingent'; without it he sinks into fantasy, which is a way of deforming reality. 'Since reality is incomplete, art must not be too afraid of incompleteness, ' says Miss Murdoch. We must not falsify it with patterns too neat, too inclusive; there must be dissonance.

Frank Kermode
it-happens-that-in-our-phase-civility-novel-is-central-form-literary-art-it-lends-itself-to-explanations-borrowed-from-any-intellectual-system-universe-which-seems-at-time-satisf
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