Faerie Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
why-hell-didnt-faerie-food-come-with-warning-written-in-bold-letters-made-in-la-la-land-eating-will-open-you-up-to-faerie-attacks-cherie-colyer
if-faerie-vampire-demon-walk-into-bar-you-wait-for-punch-line-at-private-eye-when-faerie-vampire-demon-walk-through-door-its-just-another-day-at-office-ej-stevens
we-call-them-faerie-we-dont-believe-in-them-our-loss-charles-de-lint
everyone-wants-to-grow-up-to-be-faerie-princess-trust-me-its-overrated-laurell-k-hamilton
the-best-thing-about-my-faerie-godmother-is-that-creepy-just-keeps-on-coming-jim-butcher
leave-it-to-boy-to-make-faerie-realms-look-like-dump-kiersten-white
faerie-is-perilous-land-in-it-are-pitfalls-for-unwary-dungeons-for-overbold-j-r-r-tolkien
thanks-i-say-finn-looks-uncomfortable-mum-used-to-say-he-was-like-faerie-he-didnt-like-to-be-thanked-i-add-sorry-maggie-stiefvater
the-problem-with-faerie-gifts-is-that-they-always-come-with-price-which-is-why-they-are-made-by-desperate-foolish
angels-pixies-faerie-dust-treading-love-living-lust-jesse-tyler-ferguson
for-trouble-with-real-folk-faerie-is-that-they-do-not-always-look-like-what-they-are-they-put-on-pride-beauty-that-we-would-fain-wear-ourselves-j-r-r-tolkien
arent-faeries-supposed-to-be-like-really-tiny-with-wings-wand-faerie-dust-im-not-tinker-bell-rachel-morgan
turns-out-faerieproofing-person-required-length-chain-that-one-could-find-in-any-hardware-store-cherie-colyer
the-tales-elfland-do-not-stand-fall-on-their-actuality-but-on-their-truthfulness-their-speaking-to-human-condition-longings-we-all-have-for-faerie-other-jane-yolen
she-padded-toward-han-barefoot-like-faerie-startled-out-forest-bower-bewitching-mix-clan-flatland-beauty-cinda-williams-chima
she-was-never-going-to-get-used-to-how-much-faeries-seem-to-stare-at-her-as-if-dissecting-her-examining-little-pieces-inside-her-like-science-projectever-fire-a-dark-faerie-tale-
none-books-are-worth-reading-there-are-no-fairy-tales-no-faerie-tails-no-swordswinging-princesses-lightningthrowing-gods-laurie-halse-anderson
the-catering-on-true-blood-was-good-id-be-eating-amazing-doughnuts-all-day-then-realised-i-was-in-danger-turning-into-right-fat-faerie
most-critics-agree-with-seventeenthcentury-printer-who-gave-them-to-world-that-mutabilitie-cantos-seem-to-be-part-some-following-book-the-faerie-queene-janet-spens
every-place-but-that-in-which-one-is-born-is-equally-strange-wondrous-once-beyond-bounds-city-walls-none-knows-what-may-happen-we-have-stepped-forth-into-land-faerie-but-at-least
know-goodwife-that-faerie-is-shaped-by-storytellers-their-fantasies-their-dreams-give-my-realm-life-we-were-dying-all-us-from-smallest-nixie-to-highborn-sidhe-for-want-storytelle
i-havent-finished-revisiting-sleeping-beauty-as-faerie-tale-that-one-is-rife-with-inherent-difficulties-after-all-world-doesnt-stop-just-because-one-person-is-asleep-anna-sheehan
ive-got-idea-for-modern-day-faerie-tale-that-i-think-would-made-great-short-novel-but-i-just-dont-have-time-to-work-on-it-right-now-im-way-too-busy-with-kingkiller-chronicles-bei
one-faerie-then-we-were-free-just-on-more-swing-my-arm-and-maybe-one-more-after-that-maybe-one-more-swing-up-inward-into-my-own-heart-sarah-j-maas
when-i-told-my-teachers-i-wanted-to-be-writer-alot-them-encouraged-me-to-lower-my-expectations-to-be-more-realistic-so-i-rode-away-on-my-magical-winged-horse-spraying-faerie-dust
she-wondered-if-he-thought-this-was-all-lark-game-shed-been-to-disney-world-once-there-fairies-were-cute-sweet-didnt-attempt-to-kill-visitors-living-here-wasnt-anything-like-huma
do-you-remember-what-i-told-you-that-first-time-at-takis-about-faerie-food-i-remember-you-said-you-ran-down-madison-avenue-naked-with-antlers-on-your-head-said-clary-blinking-sil
Or maybe this wasn't a human-faerie translation problem at all. Maybe this was a male-female translation problem. I read an article once that said that when women have a conversation, they're communicating on five levels. They follow the conversation that they're actually having, the conversation that is specifically being avoided, the tone being applied to the overt conversation, the buried conversation that is being covered only in subtext, and finally the other person's body language. That is, on many levels, astounding to me. I mean, that's like having a freaking superpower. When I, and most other people with a Y chromosome, have a conversation, we're having a conversation. Singular. We're paying attention to what is being said, considerating that, and replying to it. All these other conversations that have apparently been going on for the last several thousand years? I didn't even know tht they existed until I read that stupid article, and I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one. I felt somewhat skeptical about the article's grounding. There were probably a lot of women who didn't communicate on multiple wavelenghts at once. There were probably men who could handle that many just fine. I just wasn't one of them. So, ladies, if you ever have some conversation with your boyfriend or husband or brother or male friend, and you are telling him something perfectly obvious, and he comes away from it utterly clueless? I know it's tempting to think to yourself, "The man can't possibly be that stupid!" But yes. Yes he can.

Jim Butcher
or-maybe-this-wasnt-humanfaerie-translation-problem-at-all-maybe-this-was-malefemale-translation-problem-i-read-article-once-that-said-that-when-women-have-conversation-theyre-co
da-this-is-going-well-already-thomas-barked-out-laugh-there-are-seven-us-against-red-king-his-thirteen-most-powerful-nobles-its-going-well-mouse-sneezed-eight-thomas-corrected-hi
I have used the theologians and their treatment of apocalypse as a model of what we might expect to find not only in more literary treatments of the same radical fiction, but in the literary treatment of radical fictions in general. The assumptions I have made in doing so I shall try to examine next time. Meanwhile it may be useful to have some kind of summary account of what I've been saying. The main object: is the critical business of making sense of some of the radical ways of making sense of the world. Apocalypse and the related themes are strikingly long-lived; and that is the first thing to say tbout them, although the second is that they change. The Johannine acquires the characteristics of the Sibylline Apocalypse, and develops other subsidiary fictions which, in the course of time, change the laws we prescribe to nature, and specifically to time. Men of all kinds act, as well as reflect, as if this apparently random collocation of opinion and predictions were true. When it appears that it cannot be so, they act as if it were true in a different sense. Had it been otherwise, Virgil could not have been altissimo poeta in a Christian tradition; the Knight Faithful and True could not have appeared in the opening stanzas of "The Faerie Queene". And what is far more puzzling, the City of Apocalypse could not have appeared as a modern Babylon, together with the 'shipmen and merchants who were made rich by her' and by the 'inexplicable splendour' of her 'fine linen, and purple and scarlet, ' in The Waste Land, where we see all these things, as in Revelation, 'come to nought.' Nor is this a matter of literary allusion merely. The Emperor of the Last Days turns up as a Flemish or an Italian peasant, as Queen Elizabeth or as Hitler; the Joachite transition as a Brazilian revolution, or as the Tudor settlement, or as the Third Reich. The apocalyptic types-empire, decadence and renovation, progress and catastrophe-are fed by history and underlie our ways of making sense of the world from where we stand, in the middest.

Frank Kermode
i-have-used-theologians-their-treatment-apocalypse-as-model-what-we-might-expect-to-find-not-only-in-more-literary-treatments-same-radical-fiction-but-in-literary-treatment-radic
While this is all very amusing, the kiss that will free the girl is the kiss that she most desires, ' she said. 'Only that and nothing more.' Jace's heart started to pound. He met the Queen's eyes with his own. 'Why are you doing this?' ... 'Desire is not always lessened by disgust... And as my words bind my magic, so you can know the truth. If she doesn't desire your kiss, she won't be free.' 'You don't have to do this, Clary, it's a trick-' (Simon)... Isabelle sounded exasperated. 'Who cares, anyway? It's just a kiss.' 'That's right, ' Jace said. Clary looked up, then finally, and her wide green eyes rested on him. He moved toward her... and put his hand on her shoulder, turning her to face him... He could feel the tension in his own body, the effort of holding back, of not pulling her against him and taking this one chance, however dangerous and stupid and unwise, and kissing her the way he had thought he would never, in his life, be able to kiss her again. 'It's just a kiss, ' he said, and heard the roughness in his own voice, and wondered if she heard it, too. Not that it mattered-there was no way to hide it. It was too much. He had never wanted like this before... She understood him, laughed when he laughed, saw through the defenses he put up to what was underneath. There was no Jace Wayland more real than the one he saw in her eyes when she looked at him... All he knew was that whatever he had to owe to Hell or Heaven for this chance, he was going to make it count. He... whispered in her ear. 'You can close your eyes and think of England, if you like, ' he said. Her eyes fluttered shut, her lashes coppery lines against her pale, fragile skin. 'I've never even been to England, ' she said, and the softness, the anxiety in her voice almost undid him. He had never kissed a girl without knowing she wanted it too, usually more than he did, and this was Clary, and he didn't know what she wanted. Her eyes were still closed, but she shivered, and leaned into him - barely, but it was permission enough. His mouth came down on hers. And that was it. All the self-control he'd exerted over the past weeks went, like water crashing through a broken dam. Her arms came up around his neck and he pulled her against him... His hands flattened against her back... and she was up on the tips of her toes, kissing him as fiercely as he was kissing her... He clung to her more tightly, knotting his hands in her hair, trying to tell her, with the press of his mouth on hers, all the things he could never say out loud... His hands slid down to her waist... he had no idea what he would have done or said next, if it would have been something he could never have pretended away or taken back, but he heard a soft hiss of laughter - the Faerie Queen - in his ears, and it jolted him back to reality. He pulled away from Clary before he it was too late, unlocking her hands from around his neck and stepping back... Clary was staring at him. Her lips were parted, her hands still open. Her eyes were wide. Behind her, Alec and Isabelle were gaping at them; Simon looked as if he was about to throw up... If there had ever been any hope that he could have come to think of Clary as just his sister, this - what had just happened between them - had exploded it into a thousand pieces... He tried to read Clary's face - did she feel the same? ... I know you felt it, he said to her with his eyes, and it was half bitter triumph and half pleading. I know you felt it, too... She glanced away from him... He whirled on the Queen. 'Was that good enough?' he demanded. 'Did that entertain you?' The Queen gave him a look: special and secretive and shared between the two of them. 'We are quite entertained, " she said. 'But not, I think, so much as the both of you.

Cassandra Clare
while-this-is-all-amusing-kiss-that-will-free-girl-is-kiss-that-she-most-desires-she-said-only-that-nothing-more-jaces-heart-started-to-pound-he-met-queens-eyes-with-his-own-why-
Reading list (1972 edition)[edit] 1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey 2. The Old Testament 3. Aeschylus - Tragedies 4. Sophocles - Tragedies 5. Herodotus - Histories 6. Euripides - Tragedies 7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War 8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings 9. Aristophanes - Comedies 10. Plato - Dialogues 11. Aristotle - Works 12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus 13. Euclid - Elements 14. Archimedes - Works 15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections 16. Cicero - Works 17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things 18. Virgil - Works 19. Horace - Works 20. Livy - History of Rome 21. Ovid - Works 22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia 23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania 24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic 25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion 26. Ptolemy - Almagest 27. Lucian - Works 28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations 29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties 30. The New Testament 31. Plotinus - The Enneads 32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine 33. The Song of Roland 34. The Nibelungenlied 35. The Saga of Burnt Nje¡l 36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica 37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy 38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales 39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks 40. Niccole² Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy 41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly 42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres 43. Thomas More - Utopia 44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises 45. Frane§ois Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel 46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion 47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays 48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies 49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote 50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene 51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis 52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays 53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences 54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World 55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals 56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan 57. Rene Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy 58. John Milton - Works 59. Molie¨re - Comedies 60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises 61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light 62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics 63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education 64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies 65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics 66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology 67. Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe 68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal 69. William Congreve - The Way of the World 70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge 71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man 72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws 73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary 74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones 75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets

Mortimer J. Adler
reading-list-1972-editionedit-1homer-iliad-odyssey-2the-old-testament-3aeschylus-tragedies-4sophocles-tragedies-5herodotus-histories-6euripides-tragedies-7-thucydides-history-pel
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