Huxley Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares. But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think. What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us. This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.

Neil Postman
we-were-keeping-our-eye-on-1984-when-year-came-prophecy-didnt-thoughtful-americans-sang-softly-in-praise-themselves-the-roots-liberal-democracy-had-held-wherever-else-terror-had-
On the morning of November 22nd, a Friday, it became clear the gap between living and dying was closing. Realizing that Aldous [Huxley] might not survive the day, Laura [Huxley's wife] sent a telegram to his son, Matthew, urging him to come at once. At ten in the morning, an almost inaudible Aldous asked for paper and scribbled "If I go" and then some directions about his will. It was his first admission that he might die... Around noon he asked for a pad of paper and scribbled LSD-try it intermuscular 100mm In a letter circulated to Aldous's friends, Laura Huxley described what followed: 'You know very well the uneasiness in the medical mind about this drug. But no 'authority', not even an army of authorities, could have stopped me then. I went into Aldous's room with the vial of LSD and prepared a syringe. The doctor asked me if I wanted him to give the shot- maybe because he saw that my hands were trembling. His asking me that made me conscious of my hands, and I said, 'No, I must do this.' An hour later she gave Huxley a second 100mm. Then she began to talk, bending close to his ear, whispering, 'light and free you let go, darling; forward and up. You are going forward and up; you are going toward the light. Willingly and consciously you are going, willingly and consciously, and you are doing this beautifully - you are going toward the light - you are going toward a greater love ... You are going toward Maria's [Huxley's first wife, who had died many years earlier] love with my love. You are going toward a greater love than you have ever known. You are going toward the best, the greatest love, and it is easy, it is so easy, and you are doing it so beautifully.' All struggle ceased. The breathing became slower and slower and slower until, 'like a piece of music just finishing so gently in sempre piu piano, dolcamente, ' at twenty past five in the afternoon, Aldous Huxley died.

Jay Stevens
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all-raw-uncooked-protesting-on-aldous-huxley-virginia-woolf
television-is-soma-aldous-huxleys-brave-new-world-robert-macneil
i-know-lsd-i-dont-need-to-take-it-anymore-maybe-when-i-die-like-aldous-huxley-albert-hofmann
you-go-back-to-t-h-huxley-who-coined-term-what-he-said-i-came-to-believe-he-is-right-is-that-agnosticism-asserts-not-only-that-he-himself-didnt-know-if-there-was-god-not-but-that
a-man-got-up-after-one-huxleys-sermons-said-they-had-never-heard-anything-like-that-in-norwich-before-never-did-science-seem-vast-mere-creeds-adrian-desmond
i-have-no-great-quickness-apprehension-wit-which-is-remarkable-in-some-clever-men-for-instance-huxley-charles-darwin
the-library-refused-many-downloads-course-but-i-succeeded-with-two-optimists-translated-from-late-english-orwell-huxley-david-mitchell
when-on-my-return-to-england-i-showed-cast-cranium-to-professor-huxley-he-remarked-at-once-that-it-was-most-ape-like-skull-he-had-ever-beheld
throughout-history-there-have-been-many-other-examples-similar-to-that-haeckel-huxley-cell-where-key-piece-particular-scientific-puzzle-was-michael-behe
my-perfect-day-would-be-to-go-on-picnic-up-mt-wilson-with-christopher-isherwood-greta-garbo-aldous-huxley-bertrand-russell
it-wasnt-until-after-id-been-around-timothy-leary-aldous-huxley-alan-watts-that-i-started-to-reflect-about-issues-like-evolution-consciousness-ram-dass
the-position-modern-science-as-far-as-ignorant-man-letters-can-understand-it-seems-not-step-in-advance-that-held-by-huxley-romanes-in-last-albert-j-nock
i-browsed-far-outside-science-in-my-reading-attended-public-lectures-bertrand-russell-h-g-wells-huxley-shaw-being-my-favorite-speakers-raymond-cattell
god-is-not-exclamation-point-he-is-at-his-best-semicolon-connecting-people-generating-what-aldous-huxley-called-human-grace-somewhere-along-way-eric-weiner
god-is-not-exclamation-point-he-is-at-his-best-semicolon-connecting-people-generating-what-aldous-huxley-called-human-grace-somewhere-along-way-weve-lost-sight-this-eric-weiner
theres-joke-in-everything-trick-is-finding-it-the-best-compliment-joke-can-get-is-what-huxley-said-about-darwins-theory-evolution-why-didnt-i-emo-philips
she-spoke-under-her-breath-to-nick-is-there-reason-hes-only-wearing-one-sock-he-puked-on-his-foot-oh-she-turned-back-to-huxley-can-we-get-you-another-sock-maybe-blanket-something
i-know-these-are-going-to-sound-like-school-reading-list-suggestions-but-if-you-like-dystopian-fiction-you-should-check-out-some-originals-anthem-by-ayn-rand-1984-by-george-orwel
each-us-has-explanatory-style-and-our-explanation-is-more-important-than-experience-itself-in-words-aldous-huxley-experience-is-not-what-happens-to-man-it-is-what-man-does-with-w
i-encourage-everyone-to-read-james-baldwin-malcom-x-aldous-huxley-to-read-primo-levi-to-read-silent-spring-to-read-toni-morrison-to-read-zora-neale-hurston
It would be pleasant to believe that the age of pessimism is now coming to a close, and that its end is marked by the same author who marked its beginning: Aldous Huxley. After thirty years of trying to find salvation in mysticism, and assimilating the Wisdom of the East, Huxley published in 1962 a new constructive utopia, The Island. In this beautiful book he created a grand synthesis between the science of the West and the Wisdom of the East, with the same exceptional intellectual power which he displayed in his Brave New World. (His gaminerie is also unimpaired; his close union of eschatology and scatology will not be to everybody's tastes.) But though his Utopia is constructive, it is not optimistic; in the end his island Utopia is destroyed by the sort of adolescent gangster nationalism which he knows so well, and describes only too convincingly. This, in a nutshell, is the history of thought about the future since Victorian days. To sum up the situation, the sceptics and the pessimists have taken man into account as a whole; the optimists only as a producer and consumer of goods. The means of destruction have developed pari passu with the technology of production, while creative imagination has not kept pace with either. The creative imagination I am talking of works on two levels. The first is the level of social engineering, the second is the level of vision. In my view both have lagged behind technology, especially in the highly advanced Western countries, and both constitute dangers.

Dennis Gabor
it-would-be-pleasant-to-believe-that-age-pessimism-is-now-coming-to-close-that-its-end-is-marked-by-same-author-who-marked-its-beginning-aldous-huxley-after-thirty-years-trying-t
Darwin, with his Origin of Species, his theories about Natural Selection, the Survival of the Fittest, and the influence of environment, shed a flood of light upon the great problems of plant and animal life. These things had been guessed, prophesied, asserted, hinted by many others, but Darwin, with infinite patience, with perfect care and candor, found the facts, fulfilled the prophecies, and demonstrated the truth of the guesses, hints and assertions. He was, in my judgment, the keenest observer, the best judge of the meaning and value of a fact, the greatest Naturalist the world has produced. The theological view began to look small and mean. Spencer gave his theory of evolution and sustained it by countless facts. He stood at a great height, and with the eyes of a philosopher, a profound thinker, surveyed the world. He has influenced the thought of the wisest. Theology looked more absurd than ever. Huxley entered the lists for Darwin. No man ever had a sharper sword - a better shield. He challenged the world. The great theologians and the small scientists - those who had more courage than sense, accepted the challenge. Their poor bodies were carried away by their friends. Huxley had intelligence, industry, genius, and the courage to express his thought. He was absolutely loyal to what he thought was truth. Without prejudice and without fear, he followed the footsteps of life from the lowest to the highest forms. Theology looked smaller still. Haeckel began at the simplest cell, went from change to change - from form to form - followed the line of development, the path of life, until he reached the human race. It was all natural. There had been no interference from without. I read the works of these great men - of many others - and became convinced that they were right, and that all the theologians - all the believers in "special creation" were absolutely wrong. The Garden of Eden faded away, Adam and Eve fell back to dust, the snake crawled into the grass, and Jehovah became a miserable myth.

Robert G. Ingersoll
darwin-with-his-origin-species-his-theories-about-natural-selection-survival-fittest-influence-environment-shed-flood-light-upon-great-problems-plant-animal-life-these-things-had
But it so happens that everything on this planet is, ultimately, irrational; there is not, and cannot be, any reason for the causal connexion of things, if only because our use of the word "reason" already implies the idea of causal connexion. But, even if we avoid this fundamental difficulty, Hume said that causal connexion was not merely unprovable, but unthinkable; and, in shallower waters still, one cannot assign a true reason why water should flow down hill, or sugar taste sweet in the mouth. Attempts to explain these simple matters always progress into a learned lucidity, and on further analysis retire to a remote stronghold where every thing is irrational and unthinkable. If you cut off a man's head, he dies. Why? Because it kills him. That is really the whole answer. Learned excursions into anatomy and physiology only beg the question; it does not explain why the heart is necessary to life to say that it is a vital organ. Yet that is exactly what is done, the trick that is played on every inquiring mind. Why cannot I see in the dark? Because light is necessary to sight. No confusion of that issue by talk of rods and cones, and optical centres, and foci, and lenses, and vibrations is very different to Edwin Arthwait's treatment of the long-suffering English language. Knowledge is really confined to experience. The laws of Nature are, as Kant said, the laws of our minds, and, as Huxley said, the generalization of observed facts. It is, therefore, no argument against ceremonial magic to say that it is "absurd" to try to raise a thunderstorm by beating a drum; it is not even fair to say that you have tried the experiment, found it would not work, and so perceived it to be "impossible." You might as well claim that, as you had taken paint and canvas, and not produced a Rembrandt, it was evident that the pictures attributed to his painting were really produced in quite a different way. You do not see why the skull of a parricide should help you to raise a dead man, as you do not see why the mercury in a thermometer should rise and fall, though you elaborately pretend that you do; and you could not raise a dead man by the aid of the skull of a parricide, just as you could not play the violin like Kreisler; though in the latter case you might modestly add that you thought you could learn. This is not the special pleading of a professed magician; it boils down to the advice not to judge subjects of which you are perfectly ignorant, and is to be found, stated in clearer and lovelier language, in the Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley.

Aleister Crowley
but-it-happens-that-everything-on-this-planet-is-ultimately-irrational-there-is-not-cannot-be-any-reason-for-causal-connexion-things-if-only-because-our-use-word-reason-already-i
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