Idealized Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
i-dont-want-to-be-idealized-by-patient-because-what-ive-written
their-reality-was-far-more-interesting-than-any-idealized-version-could-possibly-be-donna-tartt
i-do-not-believe-that-average-person-wants-map-his-face-i-believe-he-wants-to-be-idealized-louis-fabian-bachrach
the-basis-insincerity-is-idealized-image-we-hold-ourselves-wish-to-impose-on-others-anais-nin
tell-me-what-you-yearn-for-i-shall-tell-you-who-you-are-we-are-what-we-reach-for-idealized-image-that-drives-our-wandering-james-hillman
we-have-this-idealized-romanticism-about-how-love-might-solve-all-our-problems-but-then-it-doesnt
women-are-the-only-exploited-group-in-history-to-have-been-idealized-into-powerlessness
love-at-distance-may-be-poignant-it-is-also-idealized-contact-more-than-separation-is-test-attachment-ilka-chase
maybe-im-too-masculine-casting-directors-cast-in-their-own-idealized-image-maybe-i-dont-look-like-anybodys-ideal-charles-bronson
my-father-happened-to-be-doctor-though-i-loved-idealized-him-privately-professionally-i-never-had-any-use-for-him-anyone-connected-with-that-science
the-world-is-full-of-people-whose-notion-of-a-satisfactory-future-is-in-fact-a-return-to-the-idealized-past
the-world-is-full-people-whose-notion-satisfactory-future-is-in-fact-return-to-idealized-past-robertson-davies
i-grew-up-with-idealized-version-sport-that-people-do-it-because-they-love-horses-i-guess-thats-just-romantic-illusion-james-hastie
even-though-i-love-my-mother-i-didnt-want-to-make-idealized-portrait-her-im-fascinated-more-by-her-defects-they-are-funnier-than-her-other-qualities
the-exposure-to-idealized-body-images-found-in-todays-society-lowers-many-womens-satisfaction-with-their-own-attractiveness
i-have-prayed-for-years-for-one-good-humiliation-day-then-i-must-watch-my-reaction-to-it-i-have-no-other-way-spotting-both-my-denied-shadow-self-my-idealized-persona-richard-rohr
in-idealized-world-we-would-all-be-able-to-do-what-our-english-teachers-told-us-to-do-which-is-to-write-beautiful-prose-where-enthusiasm-is-conveyed-will-schwalbe
why-be-in-music-why-write-songs-if-you-cant-use-them-to-explore-life-idealized-vision-life-rufus-wainwright
weve-always-idealized-youth-then-destroyed-youth-that-has-happened-since-beginning-time-im-fascinated-by-why-we-do-that
fantasy-is-like-idealized-reality-core-fantasy-is-one-person-can-make-difference
sometimes-you-make-record-that-is-what-you-want-to-hear-ive-made-couple-those-idealized-creations-what-i-wanted-to-hear-then-there-are-records-sondre-lerche
a-lot-people-want-to-see-this-idealized-version-heroism-all-pretty-perfect-im-not-interested-in-playing-goody-goody-hero-at-all
familiar-life-tending-to-sordidness-had-been-succeeded-by-remote-life-generally-idealized-historical-detail-had-been-brought-in-to-teach-readers-who-carl-clinton-van-doren
spontaneous-honest-love-admits-errors-hesitations-human-failings-it-can-be-tested-repaired-idealized-love-ties-us-because-we-already-intuit-that-it-is-unreal-are-afraid-to-face-t
Novelists when they write novels tend to take an almost godlike attitude toward their subject, pretending to a total comprehension of the story, a man's life, which they can therefore recount as God Himself might, nothing standing between them and the naked truth, the entire story meaningful in every detail. I am as little able to do this as the novelist is, even though my story is more important to me than any novelist's is to him - for this is my story; it is the story of a man, not of an invented, or possible, or idealized, or otherwise absent figure, but of a unique being of flesh and blood, Yet, what a real living human being is made of seems to be less understood today than at any time before, and men - each one of whom represents a unique and valuable experiment on the part of nature - are therefore shot wholesale nowadays. If we were not something more than unique human beings, if each one of us could really be done away with once and for all by a single bullet, storytelling would lose all purpose. But every man is more than just himself; he also represents the unique, the very special and always significant and remarkable point at which the world's phenomena intersect, only once in this way and never again. That is why every man's story is important, eternal, sacred; that is why every man, as long as he lives and fulfills the will of nature, is wondrous, and worthy of every consideration. In each individual the spirit has become flesh, in each man the creation suffers, within each one a redeemer is nailed to the cross.

Hermann Hesse
novelists-when-they-write-novels-tend-to-take-almost-godlike-attitude-toward-their-subject-pretending-to-total-comprehension-story-mans-life-which-they-can-therefore-recount-as-g
The idealized market was supposed to deliver 'friction free' exchanges, in which the desires of consumers would be met directly, without the need for intervention or mediation by regulatory agencies. Yet the drive to assess the performance of workers and to measure forms of labor which, by their nature, are resistant to quantification, has inevitably required additional layers of management and bureaucracy. What we have is not a direct comparison of workers' performance or output, but a comparison between the audited representation of that performance and output. Inevitably, a short-circuiting occurs, and work becomes geared towards the generation and massaging of representations rather than to the official goals of the work itself. Indeed, an anthropological study of local government in Britain argues that 'More effort goes into ensuring that a local authority's services are represented correctly than goes into actually improving those services'. This reversal of priorities is one of the hallmarks of a system which can be characterized without hyperbole as 'market Stalinism'. What late capitalism repeats from Stalinism is just this valuing of symbols of achievement over actual achievement. [... ] It would be a mistake to regard this market Stalinism as some deviation from the 'true spirit' of capitalism. On the contrary, it would be better to say that an essential dimension of Stalinism was inhibited by its association with a social project like socialism and can only emerge in a late capitalist culture in which images acquire an autonomous force. The way value is generated on the stock exchange depends of course less on what a company 'really does', and more on perceptions of, and beliefs about, its (future) performance. In capitalism, that is to say, all that is solid melts into PR, and late capitalism is defined at least as much by this ubiquitous tendency towards PR-production as it is by the imposition of market mechanisms.

Mark Fisher
the-idealized-market-was-supposed-to-deliver-friction-free-exchanges-in-which-desires-consumers-would-be-met-directly-without-need-for-intervention-mediation-by-regulatory-agenci
Moving on, while he wondered, the dark through which Mr. Lecky's light cut grew more beautiful with scents. Particles of solid matter so minute, gases so subtle, that they filtered through stopping and sealing, hung on the unstirred air. Drawn in with Mr. Lecky's breath came impalpable dews cooked out of disintegrating coal. Distilled, chemically split and reformed, they ended in flawless simulation of the aromas of gums, the scent of woods and the world's flowers. The chemists who made them could do more than that. Loose on the gloom were perfumes of flowers which might possibly have bloomed but never had, and the strong-smelling saps of trees either lost or not yet evolved. Mixed in the mucus of the pituitary membrane, these volatile essences meant more than synthetic chemistry to Mr. Lecky. Their microscopic slime coated the bushed-out ends of the olfactory nerve; their presence was signaled to the anterior of the brain's temporal lobe. At once, thought waited on them, tossing down from the great storehouse of old images, neglected ideas - sandalwood and roses, musk and lavender. Mr. Lecky stood still, wrung by pangs as insistent and unanswerable as hunger. He was prodded by the unrest of things desired, not had; the surfeit of things had, not desired. More than anything he could see, or words, or sounds, these odors made him stupidly aware of the past. Unable to remember it, whence he was, or where he had previously been, all that was sweet, impermanent and gone came back not spoiled by too much truth or exact memory. Volatile as the perfumes, the past stirred him with longing for what was not - the only beloved beauty which you will have to see but which you may not keep. Mr. Lecky's beam of light went through glass top and side of a counter, displayed bottles of colored liquid - straw, amber, topaz - threw shadows behind their diverse shapes. He had no use for perfume. All the distraction, all the sense of loss and implausible sweetness which he felt was in memory of women. Behind the counter, Mr. Lecky, curious, took out bottles, sniffed them, examined their elaborately varied forms - transparent squares, triangles, cones, flattened ovals. Some were opaque, jet or blue, rough with embedded metals in intricate design. This great and needless decoration of the flasks which contained it was one strange way to express the inexpressible. Another way was tried in the names put on the bottles. Here words ran the suggestive or symbolic gamut of idealized passion, or festive night, of desired caresses, or of abstractions of the painful allure yet farther fetched. Not even in the hopeful, miracle-raving fancy of those who used the perfumes could a bottle of liquid have any actual magic. Since the buyers at the counters must be human beings, nine of every ten were beyond this or other help. Women, young, but unlovely and unloved, women, whatever they had been, now at the end of it and ruined by years or thickened to caricature by fat, ought to be the ones called to mind by perfume. But they were not. Mr. Lecky held the bottle in his hand a long while, aware of the tenth woman.

James Gould Cozzens
moving-on-while-he-wondered-dark-through-which-mr-leckys-light-cut-grew-more-beautiful-with-scents-particles-solid-matter-minute-gases-subtle-that-they-filtered-through-stopping-
It happens that in our phase of civility, the novel is the central form of literary art. It lends itself to explanations borrowed from any intellectual system of the universe which seems at the time satisfactory. Its history is an attempt to evade the laws of what Scott called 'the land of fiction'-the stereotypes which ignore reality, and whose remoteness from it we identify as absurd. From Cervantes forward it has been, when it has satisfied us, the poetry which is 'capable, ' in the words of Ortega, 'of coping with present reality.' But it is a 'realistic poetry' and its theme is, bluntly, 'the collapse of the poetic' because it has to do with 'the barbarous, brutal, mute, meaningless reality of things.' It cannot work with the old hero, or with the old laws of the land of romance; moreover, such new laws and customs as it creates have themselves to be repeatedly broken under the demands of a changed and no less brutal reality. 'Reality has such a violent temper that it does not tolerate the ideal even when reality itself is idealized.' Nevertheless, the effort continues to be made. The extremest revolt against the customs or laws of fiction-the antinovels of Fielding or Jane Austen or Flaubert or Natalie Sarraute-creates its new laws, in their turn to be broken. Even when there is a profession of complete narrative anarchy, as in some of the works I discussed last week, or in a poem such as Paterson, which rejects as spurious whatever most of us understand as form, it seems that time will always reveal some congruence with a paradigm-provided always that there is in the work that necessary element of the customary which enables it to communicate at all. I shall not spend much time on matters so familiar to you. Whether, with Luke¡cs, you think of the novel as peculiarly the resolution of the problem of the individual in an open society-or as relating to that problem in respect of an utterly contingent world; or express this in terms of the modern French theorists and call its progress a necessary and 'unceasing movement from the known to the unknown'; or simply see the novel as resembling the other arts in that it cannot avoid creating new possibilities for its own future-however you put it, the history of the novel is the history of forms rejected or modified, by parody, manifesto, neglect, as absurd. Nowhere else, perhaps, are we so conscious of the dissidence between inherited forms and our own reality. There is at present some good discussion of the issue not only in French but in English. Here I have in mind Iris Murdoch, a writer whose persistent and radical thinking about the form has not as yet been fully reflected in her own fiction. She contrasts what she calls 'crystalline form' with narrative of the shapeless, quasi-documentary kind, rejecting the first as uncharacteristic of the novel because it does not contain free characters, and the second because it cannot satisfy that need of form which it is easier to assert than to describe; we are at least sure that it exists, and that it is not always illicit. Her argument is important and subtle, and this is not an attempt to restate it; it is enough to say that Miss Murdoch, as a novelist, finds much difficulty in resisting what she calls 'the consolations of form' and in that degree damages the 'opacity, ' as she calls it, of character. A novel has this (and more) in common with love, that it is, so to speak, delighted with its own inventions of character, but must respect their uniqueness and their freedom. It must do so without losing the formal qualities that make it a novel. But the truly imaginative novelist has an unshakable 'respect for the contingent'; without it he sinks into fantasy, which is a way of deforming reality. 'Since reality is incomplete, art must not be too afraid of incompleteness, ' says Miss Murdoch. We must not falsify it with patterns too neat, too inclusive; there must be dissonance.

Frank Kermode
it-happens-that-in-our-phase-civility-novel-is-central-form-literary-art-it-lends-itself-to-explanations-borrowed-from-any-intellectual-system-universe-which-seems-at-time-satisf
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