Lazarus Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
thats-greatest-comeback-since-lazarus
the-greatest-comeback-since-lazarus
wheres-bit-about-lazarus-he-asked-fyodor-dostoyevsky
it039s-the-greatest-comeback-since-lazarus
so-then-he-told-them-plainly-lazarus-is-dead-john-1114
it-was-well-to-be-martha-serve-but-better-to-be-lazarus-commune-charles-haddon-spurgeon
then-said-jesus-unto-them-plainly-lazarus-is-dead
and-when-he-thus-had-spoken-he-cried-with-a-loud-voice-lazarus-come-forth
yet-when-he-heard-that-lazarus-was-sick-he-stayed-where-he-was-two-more-days-john-116
in-1937-i-began-like-lazarus-impossible-return
now-jesus-loved-martha-and-her-sister-and-lazarus
in-hell-where-he-was-in-torment-he-looked-up-saw-abraham-far-away-with-lazarus-by-his-side-luke-1623
every-word-you-have-ever-uttered-is-engraved-upon-my-heart-lazarus-to-his-mother-elizabeth-hoyt
so-chief-priests-made-plans-to-kill-lazarus-as-well-john-1210
but-the-chief-priests-consulted-that-they-might-put-lazarus-also-to-death
at-his-gate-was-laid-beggar-named-lazarus-covered-with-sores-luke-1620
death-is-like-bedtimewe-all-want-to-put-it-off-until-tomorrow-but-when-youre-going-to-bed-im-just-getting-up-lazarus-style-jarod-kintz
these-things-said-he-and-after-that-he-saith-unto-them-our-friend-lazarus-sleepeth-but-i-go-that-i-may-awake-him-out-of-sleep
and-there-was-a-certain-beggar-named-lazarus-which-was-laid-at-his-gate-full-of-sores
there-they-made-him-a-supper-and-martha-served-but-lazarus-was-one-of-them-that-sat-at-the-table-with-him
the-people-therefore-that-was-with-him-when-he-called-lazarus-out-of-his-grave-and-raised-him-from-the-dead-bare-record
here-dinner-was-given-in-jesus-honor-martha-served-while-lazarus-was-among-those-reclining-at-table-with-him-john-122
and-in-hell-he-lift-up-his-eyes-being-in-torments-and-seeth-abraham-afar-off-and-lazarus-in-his-bosom
now-a-certain-man-was-sick-named-lazarus-of-bethany-the-town-of-mary-and-her-sister-martha
alls-fair-in-love-warwhat-contemptible-lie-notebooks-lazarus-long-robert-a-robert-heinlein
now-man-named-lazarus-was-sick-he-was-from-bethany-village-mary-her-sister-martha-john-111
now-crowd-that-was-with-him-when-he-called-lazarus-from-tomb-raised-him-from-dead-continued-to-spread-word-john-1217
another-ingredient-in-a-happy-marriage-budget-the-luxuries-first-notebooks-of-lazarus-long-robert-a
it-was-that-mary-which-anointed-the-lord-with-ointment-and-wiped-his-feet-with-her-hair-whose-brother-lazarus-was-sick
this-mary-whose-brother-lazarus-now-lay-sick-was-same-one-who-poured-perfume-on-lord-wiped-his-feet-with-her-hair-john-112
we-can-no-more-assist-holy-spirit-in-quickening-our-souls-to-spiritual-life-than-lazarus-could-help-jesus-raise-him-from-dead-rc-sproul
the-ideal-historian-goes-to-mouth-tomb-cries-lazarus-come-forth-sets-him-that-was-dead-for-ages-blinking-passionate-in-sun-austin-omalley
so-he-called-to-him-father-abraham-have-pity-on-me-send-lazarus-to-dip-tip-his-finger-in-water-cool-my-tongue-because-i-am-in-agony-in-this-fire-luke-1624
our-beasts-our-thieves-our-chattels-have-weight-for-good-for-ill-but-poor-are-only-his-image-his-presence-his-word-his-will-and-lazarus-lies-at-our-doorstep-and-dives-neglects-hi
then-jesus-six-days-before-the-passover-came-to-bethany-where-lazarus-was-which-had-been-dead-whom-he-raised-from-the-dead
six-days-before-passover-jesus-arrived-at-bethany-where-lazarus-lived-whom-jesus-had-raised-from-dead-john-121
he-answered-then-i-beg-you-father-send-lazarus-to-my-fathers-house-luke-1627
we-were-like-lazarus-we-came-back-to-life-then-it-was-like-it-got-reversed-next-thing-you-know-we-were-back-in-obituaries-don-maestri
they-had-to-call-call-and-pick-worms-off-me-like-sticky-pearls-from-poem-lady-lazarus-written-2329-october-1962-sylvia-plath
many-writers-make-mistake-making-their-readers-appear-like-lazarus-without-any-iota-care-throwing-down-books-to-readers-to-crunch-as-if-they-are-dogs-michael-bassey-johnson
but-abraham-replied-son-remember-that-in-your-lifetime-you-received-your-good-things-while-lazarus-received-bad-things-but-now-he-is-comforted-here-luke-1625
i-believe-god-weeps-over-over-death-jesus-wept-at-grave-lazarus-in-bible-jesus-weeps-at-death-steven-curtis-chapman
According to the gospels, Christ healed diseases, cast out devils, rebuked the sea, cured the blind, fed multitudes with five loaves and two fishes, walked on the sea, cursed a fig tree, turned water into wine and raised the dead. How is it possible to substantiate these miracles? The Jews, among whom they were said to have been performed, did not believe them. The diseased, the palsied, the leprous, the blind who were cured, did not become followers of Christ. Those that were raised from the dead were never heard of again. Can we believe that Christ raised the dead? A widow living in Nain is following the body of her son to the tomb. Christ halts the funeral procession and raises the young man from the dead and gives him back to the arms of his mother. This young man disappears. He is never heard of again. No one takes the slightest interest in the man who returned from the realm of death. Luke is the only one who tells the story. Maybe Matthew, Mark and John never heard of it, or did not believe it and so failed to record it. John says that Lazarus was raised from the dead. It was more wonderful than the raising of the widow's son. He had not been laid in the tomb for days. He was only on his way to the grave, but Lazarus was actually dead. He had begun to decay. Lazarus did not excite the least interest. No one asked him about the other world. No one inquired of him about their dead friends. When he died the second time no one said: 'He is not afraid. He has traveled that road twice and knows just where he is going.' We do not believe in the miracles of Mohammed, and yet they are as well attested as this. We have no confidence in the miracles performed by Joseph Smith, and yet the evidence is far greater, far better. If a man should go about now pretending to raise the dead, pretending to cast out devils, we would regard him as insane. What, then, can we say of Christ? If we wish to save his reputation we are compelled to say that he never pretended to raise the dead; that he never claimed to have cast out devils. We must take the ground that these ignorant and impossible things were invented by zealous disciples, who sought to deify their leader. In those ignorant days these falsehoods added to the fame of Christ. But now they put his character in peril and belittle the authors of the gospels. Christianity cannot live in peace with any other form of faith. If that religion be true, there is but one savior, one inspired book, and but one little narrow grass-grown path that leads to heaven. Why did he not again enter the temple and end the old dispute with demonstration? Why did he not confront the Roman soldiers who had taken money to falsely swear that his body had been stolen by his friends? Why did he not make another triumphal entry into Jerusalem? Why did he not say to the multitude: 'Here are the wounds in my feet, and in my hands, and in my side. I am the one you endeavored to kill, but death is my slave'? Simply because the resurrection is a myth. The miracle of the resurrection I do not and cannot believe. We know nothing certainly of Jesus Christ. We know nothing of his infancy, nothing of his youth, and we are not sure that such a person ever existed. There was in all probability such a man as Jesus Christ. He may have lived in Jerusalem. He may have been crucified; but that he was the Son of God, or that he was raised from the dead, and ascended bodily to heaven, has never been, and, in the nature of things, can never be, substantiated.

Robert G. Ingersoll
according-to-gospels-christ-healed-diseases-cast-out-devils-rebuked-sea-cured-blind-fed-multitudes-with-five-loaves-two-fishes-walked-on-sea-cursed-fig-tree-turned-water-into-win
That Reagan shaped mechanical gadget in the metal box that made you jump like a little sissy boy, Joe, that is the heart and soul of what the flag'n'Jebus crowd is scared of so bad they can't even think about him existing.' He looked at Joe, waiting for an aha! that didn't come. 'That whole wing of modern conservatism lives for, on, about, with, in, and by the idea that everything is happening via supernatural powers and that the devil is powerful and has to be fought. Modern science totally spoils that because it gives people so much power but not from supernatural sources. No God in the instruments, you know? 'So with modern tech we can make Ronald Reagan appear to come back from the grave, but to do it with modern tech leaves no need for spirits or sacred words or miracles or any other flavor of magic. Which only re emphasizes what they're most afraid of: living in a world where nobody paints the sky blue every morning, or leaves quarters for teeth, or made platypi as a joke, or decided to sculpt the Grand Canyon, or took granny to heaven to make chocolate chip cookies for the angels. Nobody, nobody, nobody. So since their theology won't let me bring in a Robo Jesus to call forth Robo Reagan, like sort of a Robo Lazarus, and they really want this, like so many people do... well, it can't come from nobody, it has to come from somebody, and the somebody can't be God. 'Well, if the devil is anything, he's somebody.' Joe was still sputtering. 'But it... I mean, they're going to think it's coming out of Hell! Literal capital H real place Hell!' 'Well, exactly. Think about how much that proves. If there's a Hell and a Devil, there's also a Heaven and a God. Once they have their Reagan back all they have to do is pray over him a little, drive the devil out, accept the blessing of a restored Reagan on behalf of God, and they're good to go. God forgives crazier shit than that all the time.

John Barnes
that-reagan-shaped-mechanical-gadget-in-metal-box-that-made-you-jump-like-little-sissy-boy-joe-that-is-heart-soul-what-flagnjebus-crowd-is-scared-bad-they-cant-even-think-about-h
At first Christ was a man - nothing more. Mary was his mother, Joseph his father. The genealogy of his father, Joseph, was given to show that he was of the blood of David. Then the claim was made that he was the son of God, and that his mother was a virgin, and that she remained a virgin until her death. The claim was made that Christ rose from the dead and ascended bodily to heaven. It required many years for these absurdities to take possession of the minds of men. If he really ascended, why did he not do so in public, in the presence of his persecutors? Why should this, the greatest of miracles, be done in secret, in a corner? Is Christ our example? He never said a word in favor of education. He never even hinted at the existence of any science. He never uttered a word in favor of industry, economy or of any effort to better our condition in this world. He was the enemy of the successful, of the wealthy. Dives was sent to hell, not because he was bad, but because he was rich. Lazarus went to heaven, not because he was good, but because he was poor. Christ cared nothing for painting, for sculpture, for music - nothing for any art. He said nothing about the duties of nation to nation, of king to subject; nothing about the rights of man; nothing about intellectual liberty or the freedom of speech. He said nothing about the sacredness of home; not one word for the fireside; not a word in favor of marriage, in honor of maternity. He never married. He wandered homeless from place to place with a few disciples. None of them seem to have been engaged in any useful business, and they seem to have lived on alms. All human ties were held in contempt; this world was sacrificed for the next; all human effort was discouraged. God would support and protect. At last, in the dusk of death, Christ, finding that he was mistaken, cried out: 'My God! My God! Why hast thou forsaken me? We have found that man must depend on himself. He must clear the land; he must build the home; he must plow and plant; he must invent; he must work with hand and brain; he must overcome the difficulties and obstructions; he must conquer and enslave the forces of nature to the end that they may do the work of the world.

Robert G. Ingersoll
at-first-christ-was-man-nothing-more-mary-was-his-mother-joseph-his-father-the-genealogy-his-father-joseph-was-given-to-show-that-he-was-blood-david-then-claim-was-made-that-he-w
LADY LAZARUS I have done it again. One year in every ten I manage it- A sort of walking miracle, my skin Bright as a Nazi lampshade, My right foot A paperweight, My face a featureless, fine Jew linen. Peel off the napkin O my enemy. Do I terrify?- The nose, the eye pits, the full set of teeth? The sour breath Will vanish in a day. Soon, soon the flesh The grave cave ate will be At home on me And I a smiling woman. I am only thirty. And like the cat I have nine times to die. This is Number Three. What a trash To annihilate each decade. What a million filaments. The peanut-crunching crowd Shoves in to see Them unwrap me hand and foot- The big strip tease. Gentlemen, ladies These are my hands My knees. I may be skin and bone, Nevertheless, I am the same, identical woman. The first time it happened I was ten. It was an accident. The second time I meant To last it out and not come back at all. I rocked shut As a seashell. They had to call and call And pick the worms off me like sticky pearls. Dying Is an art, like everything else. I do it exceptionally well. I do it so it feels like hell. I do it so it feels real. I guess you could say I've a call. It's easy enough to do it in a cell. It's easy enough to do it and stay put. It's the theatrical Comeback in broad day To the same place, the same face, the same brute Amused shout: 'A miracle!' That knocks me out. There is a charge For the eyeing of my scars, there is a charge For the hearing of my heart- It really goes. And there is a charge, a very large charge For a word or a touch Or a bit of blood Or a piece of my hair or my clothes. So, so, Herr Doktor. So, Herr Enemy. I am your opus, I am your valuable, The pure gold baby That melts to a shriek. I turn and burn. Do not think I underestimate your great concern. Ash, ash- You poke and stir. Flesh, bone, there is nothing there- A cake of soap, A wedding ring, A gold filling. Herr God, Herr Lucifer Beware Beware. Out of the ash I rise with my red hair And I eat men like air.

Sylvia Plath
lady-lazarus-i-have-done-it-again-one-year-in-every-ten-i-manage-it-a-sort-walking-miracle-my-skin-bright-as-nazi-lampshade-my-right-foot-a-paperweight-my-face-featureless-fine-j
I was standing lost, sunk, my hands in my pockets, gazing toward Tinker Mountain and feeling the earth reel down. All at once, I saw what looked like a Martian spaceship whirling towards me in the air. It flashed borrowed light like a propeller. Its forward motion greatly outran its fall. As I watched, transfixed, it rose, just before it would have touched a thistle, and hovered pirouetting in one spot, then twirled on and finally came to rest. I found it in the grass; it was a maple key... Hullo. I threw it into the wind and it flew off again, bristling with animate purpose, not like a thing dropped or windblown, pushed by the witless winds of convection currents hauling round the world's rondure where they must, but like a creature muscled and vigorous, or a creature spread thin to that other wind, the wind of the spirit that bloweth where it listeth, lighting, and raising up, and easing down. O maple key, I thought, I must confess I thought, o welcome, cheers. And the bell under my ribs rang a true note, a flourish of blended horns, clarion, sweet, and making a long dim sense I will try at length to explain. Flung is too harsh a word for the rush of the world. Blown is more like it, but blown by a generous, unending breath. That breath never ceases to kindle, exuberant, abandoned; frayed splinters spatter in every direction and burgeon into flame. And now when I sway to a fitful wind, alone and listing, I will think, maple key. When I see a photograph of earth from outer space, the planet so startlingly painterly and hung, I will think, maple key. When I shake your hand or meet your eyes, I will think two maple keys. If I am maple key falling, at least I can twirl. Thomas Merton wrote, 'There is always a temptation to diddle around in the contemplative life, making itsy-bitsy statues.' There is always an enormous temptation in all of life to diddle around making itsy-bitsy friends and meals and journeys for itsy-bitsy years on end. It's no self-conscious, so apparently moral, simple to step aside from the gaps where the creeks and winds pour down, saying, I never merited this grace, quite rightly, and then to sulk along the rest of your days on the edge of rage. I won't have it. The world is wilder than that in all directions, more dangerous and bitter, more extravagant and bright. We are making hay when we should be making whoopee; we are raising tomatoes when we should be raising Cain, or Lazarus. Ezekiel excoriates false prophets who have 'not gone up into the gaps.' The gaps are the thing. The gaps are the spirit's one home, the altitudes and latitudes so dazzlingly spare and clean that the spirit can discover itself for the first time like a once blind man unbound. The gaps are the cliffs in the rock where you cower to see the back parts of God; they are the fissures between mountains and cells the wind lances through, the icy narrowing fjords splitting the cliffs of mystery. Go up into the gaps. If you can find them; they shift and vanish too. Stalk the gaps. Squeak into a gap in the soil, turn, and unlock- more than a maple- a universe. This is how you spend the afternoon, and tomorrow morning, and tomorrow afternoon. Spend the afternoon. You can't take it with you.

Annie Dillard
i-was-standing-lost-sunk-my-hands-in-my-pockets-gazing-toward-tinker-mountain-feeling-earth-reel-down-all-at-once-i-saw-what-looked-like-martian-spaceship-whirling-towards-me-in-
The plane banked, and he pressed his face against the cold window. The ocean tilted up to meet him, its dark surface studded with points of light that looked like constellations, fallen stars. The tourist sitting next to him asked him what they were. Nathan explained that the bright lights marked the boundaries of the ocean cemeteries. The lights that were fainter were memory buoys. They were the equivalent of tombstones on land: they marked the actual graves. While he was talking he noticed scratch-marks on the water, hundreds of white gashes, and suddenly the captain's voice, crackling over the intercom, interrupted him. The ships they could see on the right side of the aircraft were returning from a rehearsal for the service of remembrance that was held on the ocean every year. Towards the end of the week, in case they hadn't realised, a unique festival was due to take place in Moon Beach. It was known as the Day of the Dead... When he was young, it had been one of the days he most looked forward to. Yvonne would come and stay, and she'd always bring a fish with her, a huge fish freshly caught on the ocean, and she'd gut it on the kitchen table. Fish should be eaten, she'd said, because fish were the guardians of the soul, and she was so powerful in her belief that nobody dared to disagree. He remembered how the fish lay gaping on its bed of newspaper, the flesh dark-red and subtly ribbed where it was split in half, and Yvonne with her sleeves rolled back and her wrists dipped in blood that smelt of tin. It was a day that abounded in peculiar traditions. Pass any candy store in the city and there'd be marzipan skulls and sugar fish and little white chocolate bones for 5 cents each. Pass any bakery and you'd see cakes slathered in blue icing, cakes sprinkled with sea-salt.If you made a Day of the Dead cake at home you always hid a coin in it, and the person who found it was supposed to live forever. Once, when she was four, Georgia had swallowed the coin and almost choked. It was still one of her favourite stories about herself. In the afternoon, there'd be costume parties. You dressed up as Lazarus or Frankenstein, or you went as one of your dead relations. Or, if you couldn't think of anything else, you just wore something blue because that was the colour you went when you were buried at the bottom of the ocean. And everywhere there were bowls of candy and slices of special home-made Day of the Dead cake. Nobody's mother ever got it right. You always had to spit it out and shove it down the back of some chair. Later, when it grew dark, a fleet of ships would set sail for the ocean cemeteries, and the remembrance service would be held. Lying awake in his room, he'd imagine the boats rocking the the priest's voice pushed and pulled by the wind. And then, later still, after the boats had gone, the dead would rise from the ocean bed and walk on the water. They gathered the flowers that had been left as offerings, they blew the floating candles out. Smoke that smelt of churches poured from the wicks, drifted over the slowly heaving ocean, hid their feet. It was a night of strange occurrences. It was the night that everyone was Jesus... Thousands drove in for the celebrations. All Friday night the streets would be packed with people dressed head to toe in blue. Sometimes they painted their hands and faces too. Sometimes they dyed their hair. That was what you did in Moon Beach. Turned blue once a year. And then, sooner or later, you turned blue forever.

Rupert Thomson
the-plane-banked-he-pressed-his-face-against-cold-window-the-ocean-tilted-up-to-meet-him-its-dark-surface-studded-with-points-light-that-looked-like-constellations-fallen-stars-t
?Earn cash when you save a quote by clicking
EARNED Load...
LEVEL : Load...