Overgrown Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
like-paths-alleys-overgrown-with-hardy-rankgrowing-weeds-words-we-use-are-overgrown-with-our-individual-private-provincial-associations-which-tend-stefan-themerson
you-may-think-youre-married-to-woman-but-shes-really-overgrown-child-emily-yoffe
a-poet-more-than-thirty-years-old-is-simply-overgrown-child-hl-mencken
i-believe-that-all-men-are-just-overgrown-boys-with-deep-problems-communicating-neil-gaiman
i-have-garden-my-own-but-with-roses-overgrown-and-lilies-that-you-would-it-guess-to-be-little-wilderness-andrew-marvell
what-were-fighting-against-isnt-outout-vice-its-overgrown-perverted-virtue-jared-taylor
we-have-long-become-overgrown-with-calluses-we-no-longer-hear-people-being-killed-x-yevgeny-zamyatin
damsels-were-women-unable-to-do-anything-more-complicated-than-get-themselves-captured-by-overgrown-lizards-with-virgin-fetishes-se-zbasnik
a-standing-military-force-with-overgrown-executive-will-not-long-be-safe-companions-to-liberty-james-madison
my-gardens-overgrown-i-go-out-on-my-belly-crawling-i-got-cctv-pornography-cnbc-i-got-nightly-news-to-get-to-know-enemy-u2
i-have-often-argued-that-poet-more-than-thirty-years-old-is-simply-overgrown-child-i-begin-to-suspect-that-there-may-be-some-truth-in-it-h-l-mencken
looking-at-first-assembly-is-kind-like-looking-at-overgrown-garden-you-cant-just-wade-in-with-weed-whacker-you-dont-yet-know-where-stems-walter-murch
it-is-difficult-to-cultivate-healthy-relationship-in-landscape-overgrown-with-blame-lack-trust-betrayal-saji-ijiyemi
i-think-no-virtue-goes-with-sizethe-reason-all-cowardiceis-that-men-are-overgrownand-to-be-valiant-must-come-downto-titmouse-dimension-ralph-waldo-emerson
ive-found-place-that-would-amaze-you-people-used-to-live-there-but-now-its-all-overgrown-no-one-goes-there-absolutely-no-one-only-me-just-little-karel-capek
no-one-has-been-buried-at-mill-road-cemetery-in-cambridge-england-for-many-years-place-has-shady-overgrown-magic-about-it-sophie-hannah
these-are-not-bad-people-all-they-are-concerned-about-is-to-see-that-their-sweet-little-girls-are-not-required-to-sit-in-school-alongside-some-big-dwight-d-eisenhower
your-scare-tactics-are-useless-on-me-thane-my-people-have-needs-their-own-they-dont-include-being-locked-up-in-underground-cavern-by-bunch-overgrown-mosquitoes-suzannah-daniels
the-congressional-record-will-forever-show-that-obamacare-was-passed-in-romper-room-overgrown-children-seemingly-barely-old-enough-to-keep-from-peeing-on-themselves-matt-taibbi
i-remember-when-each-4th-lot-was-vacant-overgrown-landlord-only-go-this-rent-when-you-had-it-each-day-was-clear-good-each-moment-was-full-charles-bukowski
first-in-violence-deepest-in-dirt-lawless-unlovely-illsmelling-irreverent-new-overgrown-gawk-village-tough-among-cities-spectacle-for-nation-lincoln-steffens
at-twelve-i-looked-like-girl-seventeen-my-body-was-developed-shapely-i-still-wore-blue-dress-blouse-orphanage-provided-they-made-me-look-like-marilyn-monroe
thumbtacks-all-spread-out-across-your-hometown-state-a-hollow-tree-at-half-mast-wait-until-wintertime-leaves-paper-trail-and-licorice-plant-thats-calexico
if-overgrown-child-draws-something-on-piece-paper-you-cant-ask-paper-what-drawing-is-supposed-to-represent-jostein-gaarder
for-land-my-people-land-overgrown-with-thorns-briers-yes-mourn-for-all-houses-merriment-for-this-city-revelry-isaiah-3213
most-reefs-around-christmas-island-are-dead-most-corals-are-dead-overgrown-by-algae-most-fish-are-smaller-than-pencils-we-use-to-count-them-enric-sala
too-deep-into-passage-of-love-overgrown-and-now-forever-im-cast-as-heavy-as-sinking-stone-i-cant-rise-when-i-wanna-rise-in-this-bed-i-sleep-with-shedaisy
i-know-well-that-to-admit-to-loving-bright-eyes-is-to-admit-to-having-overgrown-brain-region-devoted-to-self-pity-sentimentality-regret-handful-other-not-appealing-emotional-stat
for-boy-ten-used-to-coal-bings-rust-coloured-burns-cowdenbeath-fields-woodland-kingswood-with-its-overgrown-but-stately-avenue-copper-barked-sequoias-felt-like-local-version-para
im-not-like-professional-writer-with-professional-skills-songs-kind-come-into-my-head-same-way-they-did-when-i-was-kid-i-say-im-overgrown-kindergarten-kid-i-work-on-songs
the-fundamental-metaphor-national-socialism-as-it-related-to-world-around-it-was-garden-not-wild-forest-one-most-important-nazi-ideologists-rw-darre-made-clear-relationship-betwe
In the park which surrounded our house were the ruins of the former mansion of Brentwood, a much smaller and less important house than the solid Georgian edifice which we inhabited. The ruins were picturesque, however, and gave importance to the place. Even we, who were but temporary tenants, felt a vague pride in them, as if they somehow reflected a certain consequence upon ourselves. The old building had the remains of a tower, an indistinguishable mass of mason-work, overgrown with ivy, and the shells of walls attached to this were half filled up with soil. I had never examined it closely, I am ashamed to say. There was a large room, or what had been a large room, with the lower part of the windows still existing, on the principal floor, and underneath other windows, which were perfect, though half filled up with fallen soil, and waving with a wild growth of brambles and chance growths of all kinds. This was the oldest part of all. At a little distance were some very commonplace and disjointed fragments of the building, one of them suggesting a certain pathos by its very commonness and the complete wreck which it showed. This was the end of a low gable, a bit of grey wall, all encrusted with lichens, in which was a common doorway. Probably it had been a servants' entrance, a backdoor, or opening into what are called "the offices" in Scotland. No offices remained to be entered-pantry and kitchen had all been swept out of being; but there stood the doorway open and vacant, free to all the winds, to the rabbits, and every wild creature. It struck my eye, the first time I went to Brentwood, like a melancholy comment upon a life that was over. A door that led to nothing - closed once perhaps with anxious care, bolted and guarded, now void of any meaning. It impressed me, I remember, from the first; so perhaps it may be said that my mind was prepared to attach to it an importance, which nothing justified. ("The Open Door")

Margaret Oliphant
in-park-which-surrounded-our-house-were-ruins-former-mansion-brentwood-much-smaller-less-important-house-than-solid-georgian-edifice-which-we-inhabited-the-ruins-were-picturesque
In the beginning was the Word'. I have taken as my text this evening the almighty Word itself. Now get this: 'There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe.' Amen, brothers and sisters, Amen. And the riddle of the Word, 'In the beginning was the Word... ' Now what do you suppose old John meant by that? That cat was a preacher, and, well, you know how it is with preachers; he had something big on his mind. Oh my, it was big; it was the Truth, and it was heavy, and old John hurried to set it down. And in his hurry he said too much. 'In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.' It was the Truth, all right, but it was more than the Truth. The Truth was overgrown with fat, and the fat was God. The fat was John's God, and God stood between John and the Truth. Old John, see, he got up one morning and caught sight of the Truth. It must have been like a bolt of lightning, and the sight of it made him blind. And for a moment the vision burned on the back of his eyes, and he knew what it was. In that instant he saw something he had never seen before and would never see again. That was the instant of revelation, inspiration, Truth. And old John, he must have fallen down on his knees. Man, he must have been shaking and laughing and crying and yelling and praying - all at the same time - and he must have been drunk and delirious with the Truth. You see, he had lived all his life waiting for that one moment, and it came, and it took him by surprise, and it was gone. And he said, 'In the beginning was the Word... ' And man, right then and there he should have stopped. There was nothing more to say, but he went on. He had said all there was to say, everything, but he went on. 'In the beginning was the Word... ' Brothers and sisters, that was the Truth, the whole of it, the essential and eternal Truth, the bone and blood and muscle of the Truth. But he went on, old John, because he was a preacher. The perfect vision faded from his mind, and he went on. The instant passed, and then he had nothing but a memory. He was desperate and confused, and in his confusion he stumbled and went on. 'In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.' He went on to talk about Jews and Jerusalem, Levites and Pharisees, Moses and Philip and Andrew and Peter. Don't you see? Old John had to go on. That cat had a whole lot at stake. He couldn't let the Truth alone. He couldn't see that he had come to the end of the Truth, and he went on. He tried to make it bigger and better than it was, but instead he only demeaned and encumbered it. He made it soft and big with fat. He was a preacher, and he made a complex sentence of the Truth, two sentences, three, a paragraph. He made a sermon and theology of the Truth. He imposed his idea of God upon the everlasting Truth. 'In the beginning was the Word... ' And that is all there was, and it was enough.

N. Scott Momaday
in-beginning-was-word-i-have-taken-as-my-text-this-evening-almighty-word-itself-now-get-this-there-was-man-sent-from-god-whose-name-was-john-the-same-came-for-witness-to-bear-wit
When we strike a balance between the challenge of an activity and our skill at performing it, when the rhythm of the work itself feels in sync with our pulse, when we know that what we're doing matters, we can get totally absorbed in our task. That is happiness. The life coach Martha Beck asks new potential clients, "Is there anything you do regularly that makes you forget what time it is?" That forgetting - that pure absorption - is what the psychologist Mihaly Csikzentmihalyi calls "flow" or optimal experience. In an interview with Wired magazine, he described flow as "being completely involved in an activity for its own sake. The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz. Your whole being is involved, and you're using your skills to the utmost." In a typical day that teeters between anxiety and boredom, flow experiences are those flashes of intense living - bright against the dull. These optimal experiences can happen when we're engaged in work paid and unpaid, in sports, in music, in art. The researchers Maria Allison and Margaret Duncan have studied the role of flow in women's lives and looked at factors that contributed to what they call "antiflow." Antiflow was associated with repetitive household tasks, repetitive tasks at work, unchallenging tasks, and work we see as meaningless. But there's an element of chaos when it comes to flow. Even if we're doing meaningful and challenging work, that sense of total absoprtion can elude us. We might get completely and beautifully lost in something today, and, try as we might to re-create the same conditions tomorrow, our task might jsut feel like, well, work. In A Life of One's Own, Marion Milner described her effort to re-create teh conditions of her own recorded moments of happiness, saying, "Often when I felt certain that I had discovered the little mental act which produced the change I walked on air, exulting that I had found the key to my garden of delight and could slip through the door whenever I wished. But most often when I came again the place seemed different, the door overgrown with thorns and my key stuck in the lock. It was as if the first time I had said 'abracadabra' the door had opened, but the next time I must use a different word. (123-124).

Ariel Gore
when-we-strike-balance-between-challenge-activity-our-skill-at-performing-it-when-rhythm-work-itself-feels-in-sync-with-our-pulse-when-we-know-that-what-were-doing-matters-we-can
You. Man at the machine and man in the workshop. If tomorrow they tell you you are to make no more water-pipes and saucepans but are to make steel helmets and machine-guns, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO! You. Woman at the counter and woman in the office. If tomorrow they tell you you are to fill shells and assemble telescopic sights for snipers' rifles, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO! You. Research worker in the laboratory. If tomorrow they tell you you are to invent a new death for the old life, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO! You. Priest in the pulpit. If tomorrow they tell you you are to bless murder and declare war holy, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO! You. Pilot in your aeroplane. If tomorrow they tell you you are to carry bombs over the cities, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO! You. Man of the village and man of the town. If tomorrow they come and give you your call-up papers, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO! You. Mother in Normandy and mother in the Ukraine, mother in Vancouver and in London, you on the Hwangho and on the Mississippi, you in Naples and Hamburg and Cairo and Oslo - mothers in all parts of the earth, mothers of the world, if tomorrow they tell you you are to bear new soldiers for new battles, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO! For if you do not say NO - if YOU do not say no - mothers, then: then! In the bustling hazy harbour towns the big ships will fall silent as corpses against the dead deserted quay walls, their once shimmering bodies overgrown with seaweed and barnacles, smelling of graveyards and rotten fish. The trams will lie like senseless glass-eyed cages beside the twisted steel skeleton of wires and track. The sunny juicy vine will rot on decaying hillsides, rice will dry in the withered earth, potatoes will freeze in the unploughed land and cows will stick their death-still legs into the air like overturned chairs. In the fields beside rusted ploughs the corn will be flattened like a beaten army. Then the last human creature, with mangled entrails and infected lungs, will wander around, unanswered and lonely, under the poisonous glowing sun, among the immense mass graves and devastated cities. The last human creature, withered, mad, cursing, accusing - and the terrible accusation: WHY? will die unheard on the plains, drift through the ruins, seep into the rubble of churches, fall into pools of blood, unheard, unanswered, the last animal scream of the last human animal - All this will happen tomorrow, tomorrow, perhaps, perhaps even tonight, perhaps tonight, if - if - You do not say NO.

Wolfgang Borchert
you-man-at-machine-man-in-workshop-if-tomorrow-they-tell-you-you-are-to-make-no-more-waterpipes-saucepans-but-are-to-make-steel-helmets-machineguns-then-theres-only-one-thing-to-
What are the dead, anyway, but waves and energy? Light shining from a dead star? That, by the way, is a phrase of Julian's. I remember it from a lecture of his on the Iliad, when Patroklos appears to Achilles in a dream. There is a very moving passage where Achilles overjoyed at the sight of the apparition - tries to throw his arms around the ghost of his old friend, and it vanishes. The dead appear to us in dreams, said Julian, because that's the only way they can make us see them; what we see is only a projection, beamed from a great distance, light shining at us from a dead star... Which reminds me, by the way, of a dream I had a couple of weeks ago. I found myself in a strange deserted city - an old city, like London - underpopulated by war or disease. It was night; the streets were dark, bombed-out, abandoned. For a long time, I wandered aimlessly - past ruined parks, blasted statuary, vacant lots overgrown with weeds and collapsed apartment houses with rusted girders poking out of their sides like ribs. But here and there, interspersed among the desolate shells of the heavy old public buildings, I began to see new buildings, too, which were connected by futuristic walkways lit from beneath. Long, cool perspectives of modern architecture, rising phosphorescent and eerie from the rubble. I went inside one of these new buildings. It was like a laboratory, maybe, or a museum. My footsteps echoed on the tile floors.There was a cluster of men, all smoking pipes, gathered around an exhibit in a glass case that gleamed in the dim light and lit their faces ghoulishly from below. I drew nearer. In the case was a machine revolving slowly on a turntable, a machine with metal parts that slid in and out and collapsed in upon themselves to form new images. An Inca temple... click click click... the Pyramids... the Parthenon. History passing beneath my very eyes, changing every moment. 'I thought I'd find you here, ' said a voice at my elbow. It was Henry. His gaze was steady and impassive in the dim light. Above his ear, beneath the wire stem of his spectacles, I could just make out the powder burn and the dark hole in his right temple. I was glad to see him, though not exactly surprised. 'You know, ' I said to him, 'everybody is saying that you're dead.' He stared down at the machine. The Colosseum... click click click... the Pantheon. 'I'm not dead, ' he said. 'I'm only having a bit of trouble with my passport.' 'What?' He cleared his throat. 'My movements are restricted, ' he said. 'I no longer have the ability to travel as freely as I would like.' Hagia Sophia. St. Mark's, in Venice. 'What is this place?' I asked him. 'That information is classified, I'm afraid.' 1 looked around curiously. It seemed that I was the only visitor. 'Is it open to the public?' I said. 'Not generally, no.' I looked at him. There was so much I wanted to ask him, so much I wanted to say; but somehow I knew there wasn't time and even if there was, that it was all, somehow, beside the point. 'Are you happy here?' I said at last. He considered this for a moment. 'Not particularly, ' he said. 'But you're not very happy where you are, either.' St. Basil's, in Moscow. Chartres. Salisbury and Amiens. He glanced at his watch. 'I hope you'll excuse me, ' he said, 'but I'm late for an appointment.' He turned from me and walked away. I watched his back receding down the long, gleaming hall.

Donna Tartt
what-are-dead-anyway-but-waves-energy-light-shining-from-dead-star-that-by-way-is-phrase-julians-i-remember-it-from-lecture-his-on-iliad-when-patroklos-appears-to-achilles-in-dre
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