Salutary Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
concession-comes-with-better-grace-more-salutary-effect-from-superior-power-william-pitt
the-experience-being-disastrously-wrong-is-salutary-no-economist-should-be-denied-it-not-many-are-john-kenneth-galbraith
our-domestic-affections-are-most-salutary-basis-all-good-government-benjamin-disraeli
it-is-salutary-to-train-oneself-to-be-no-more-affected-by-censure-than-by-praise
it-is-that-we-are-too-apt-to-despise-what-appears-to-be-neither-good-nor-beautiful-thus-we-lose-what-is-helpful-salutary-george-sand
the-plays-and-sports-of-children-are-as-salutary-to-them-as-labor-and-work-are-to-grown-persons
we-are-all-warned-to-read-labels-the-salutary-truth-is-that-we-shouldnt-be-eating-anything-that-has-label-on-it-tc-fry
that-charity-is-bad-which-takes-from-independence-its-proper-pride-from-mendicity-its-salutary-shame-robert-southey
democracy-will-itself-accomplish-salutary-universal-change-from-delusive-to-real-make-new-blessed-world-us-by-by-thomas-carlyle
alone-let-him-constantly-meditate-in-solitude-on-that-which-is-salutary-for-his-soul-for-he-who-meditates-in-solitude-attains-supreme-bliss
thought-and-theory-must-precede-all-salutary-action-yet-action-is-nobler-in-itself-than-either-thought-or-theory
thought-theory-must-precede-all-salutary-action-yet-action-is-nobler-in-itself-than-either-thought-theory-william-wordsworth
Making another effort to be paradoxical, Williams decides to identify Orwell as an instance of 'the paradox of the exile'. This, which he also identified with D. H. Lawrence, constituted an actual 'tradition', which, in England: attracts to itself many of the liberal virtues: empiricism, a certain integrity, frankness. It has also, as the normally contingent virtue of exile, certain qualities of perception: in particular, the ability to distinguish inadequacies in the groups which have been rejected. It gives, also, an appearance of strength, although this is largely illusory. The qualities, though salutary, are largely negative; there is an appearance of hardness (the austere criticism of hypocrisy, complacency, self-deceit), but this is usually brittle, and at times hysterical: the substance of community is lacking, and the tension, in men of high quality, is very great. This is quite a fine passage, even when Williams is engaged in giving with one hand and taking away with the other. Orwell's working title for Nineteen Eighty-Four was 'The Last Man in Europe, ' and there are traces of a kind of solipsistic nobility elsewhere in his work, the attitude of the flinty and solitary loner. May he not be valued, however, as the outstanding English example of the dissident intellectual who preferred above all other allegiances the loyalty to truth? Self-evidently, Williams does not believe this and the clue is in the one word, so seemingly innocuous in itself, 'community.

Christopher Hitchens
making-another-effort-to-be-paradoxical-williams-decides-to-identify-orwell-as-instance-paradox-exile-this-which-he-also-identified-with-d-h-lawrence-constituted-actual-tradition
We have written the equations of water flow. From experiment, we find a set of concepts and approximations to use to discuss the solution-vortex streets, turbulent wakes, boundary layers. When we have similar equations in a less familiar situation, and one for which we cannot yet experiment, we try to solve the equations in a primitive, halting, and confused way to try to determine what new qualitatitive features may come out, or what new qualitative forms are a consequence of the equations. Our equations for the sun, for example, as a ball of hydrogen gas, describe a sun without sunspots, without the rice-grain structure of the surface, without prominences, without coronas. Yet, all of these are really in the equations; we just haven't found the way to get them out... The test of science is its ability to predict. Had you never visited the earth, could you predict the thunderstorms, the volcanoes, the ocean waves, the auroras, and the colourful sunset? A salutary lesson it will be when we learn of all that goes on on each of those dead planets-those eight or ten balls, each agglomerated from the same dust clouds and each obeying exactly the same laws of physics. The next great era of awakening of human intellect may well produce a method of understanding the qualitative content of equations. Today we cannot. Today we cannot see that the water flow equations contain such things as the barber pole structure of turbulence that one sees between rotating cylinders. Today we cannot see whether Schrodinger's equation contains frogs, musical composers, or morality-or whether it does not. We cannot say whether something beyond it like God is needed, or not. And so we can all hold strong opinions either way.

Richard Feynman
we-have-written-equations-water-flow-from-experiment-we-find-set-concepts-approximations-to-use-to-discuss-solutionvortex-streets-turbulent-wakes-boundary-layers-when-we-have-sim
Mr Kingsley begins then by exclaiming- 'O the chicanery, the wholesale fraud, the vile hypocrisy, the conscience-killing tyranny of Rome! We have not far to seek for an evidence of it. There's Father Newman to wit: one living specimen is worth a hundred dead ones. He, a Priest writing of Priests, tells us that lying is never any harm.' I interpose: 'You are taking a most extraordinary liberty with my name. If I have said this, tell me when and where.' Mr Kingsley replies: 'You said it, Reverend Sir, in a Sermon which you preached, when a Protestant, as Vicar of St Mary's, and published in 1844; and I could read you a very salutary lecture on the effects which that Sermon had at the time on my own opinion of you.' I make answer: 'Oh... NOT, it seems, as a Priest speaking of Priests-but let us have the passage.' Mr Kingsley relaxes: 'Do you know, I like your TONE. From your TONE I rejoice, greatly rejoice, to be able to believe that you did not mean what you said.' I rejoin: 'MEAN it! I maintain I never SAID it, whether as a Protestant or as a Catholic.' Mr Kingsley replies: 'I waive that point.' I object: 'Is it possible! What? waive the main question! I either said it or I didn't. You have made a monstrous charge against me; direct, distinct, public. You are bound to prove it as directly, as distinctly, as publicly-or to own you can't.' 'Well, ' says Mr Kingsley, 'if you are quite sure you did not say it, I'll take your word for it; I really will.' My WORD! I am dumb. Somehow I thought that it was my WORD that happened to be on trial. The WORD of a Professor of lying, that he does not lie! But Mr Kingsley reassures me: 'We are both gentlemen, ' he says: 'I have done as much as one English gentleman can expect from another.' I begin to see: he thought me a gentleman at the very time he said I taught lying on system...

John Henry Newman
mr-kingsley-begins-then-by-exclaiming-o-chicanery-wholesale-fraud-vile-hypocrisy-consciencekilling-tyranny-rome-we-have-not-far-to-seek-for-evidence-it-theres-father-newman-to-wi