Stiffness Quotes

Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
whenever-we-find-stiffness-in-body-our-mind-should-be-especially-supple-it-is-never-stiffness-in-our-bodies-that-limits-our-practice-it-is-always-geeta-iyengar
the-public-must-suffer-untold-pangs-from-stiffness-deliberate-stifling-emotion-on-part-many-british-actors-ivor-novello
in-my-shoulder-i-feel-this-stiffness-im-just-looking-out-for-your-best-interest-as-long-as-im-alive-so-now-im-head-over-heals-i-hope-you-know-exactly-the-spin-room
no-women-like-you-dont-write-they-carve-onion-sculptures-potato-statues-they-sit-in-dark-corners-braid-their-hair-in-new-shapes-twists-in-order-to-control-stiffness-unruliness-re
I had let it all grow. I had supposed It was all OK. Your life Was a liner I voyaged in. Costly education had fitted you out. Financiers and committees and consultants Effaced themselves in the gleam of your finish. You trembled with the new life of those engines. That first morning, Before your first class at College, you sat there Sipping coffee. Now I know, as I did not, What eyes waited at the back of the class To check your first professional performance Against their expectations. What assessors Waited to see you justify the cost And redeem their gamble. What a furnace Of eyes waited to prove your metal. I watched The strange dummy stiffness, the misery, Of your blue flannel suit, its straitjacket, ugly Half-approximation to your idea Of the properties you hoped to ease into, And your horror in it. And the tanned Almost green undertinge of your face Shrunk to its wick, your scar lumpish, your plaited Head pathetically tiny. You waited, Knowing yourself helpless in the tweezers Of the life that judges you, and I saw The flayed nerve, the unhealable face-wound Which was all you had for courage. I saw that what you gripped, as you sipped, Were terrors that killed you once already. Now I see, I saw, sitting, the lonely Girl who was going to die. That blue suit. A mad, execution uniform, Survived your sentence. But then I sat, stilled, Unable to fathom what stilled you As I looked at you, as I am stilled Permanently now, permanently Bending so briefly at your open coffin.

Ted Hughes
i-had-let-it-all-grow-i-had-supposed-it-was-all-ok-your-life-was-liner-i-voyaged-in-costly-education-had-fitted-you-out-financiers-committees-consultants-effaced-themselves-in-gl
Bradley Headstone, in his decent black coat and waistcoat, and decent white shirt, and decent formal black tie, and decent pantaloons of pepper and salt, with his decent silver watch in his pocket and its decent hair-guard round his neck, looked a thoroughly decent young man of six-and-twenty. He was never seen in any other dress, and yet there was a certain stiffness in his manner of wearing this, as if there were a want of adaptation between him and it, recalling some mechanics in their holiday clothes. He had acquired mechanically a great store of teacher's knowledge. He could do mental arithmetic mechanically, sing at sight mechanically, blow various wind instruments mechanically, even play the great church organ mechanically. From his early childhood up, his mind had been a place of mechanical stowage. The arrangement of his wholesale warehouse, so that it might be always ready to meet the demands of retail dealers history here, geography there, astronomy to the right, political economy to the left-natural history, the physical sciences, figures, music, the lower mathematics, and what not, all in their several places-this care had imparted to his countenance a look of care; while the habit of questioning and being questioned had given him a suspicious manner, or a manner that would be better described as one of lying in wait. There was a kind of settled trouble in the face. It was the face belonging to a naturally slow or inattentive intellect that had toiled hard to get what it had won, and that had to hold it now that it was gotten. He always seemed to be uneasy lest anything should be missing from his mental warehouse, and taking stock to assure himself.

Charles Dickens
bradley-headstone-in-his-decent-black-coat-waistcoat-decent-white-shirt-decent-formal-black-tie-decent-pantaloons-pepper-salt-with-his-decent-silver-watch-in-his-pocket-its-decen
Dickinson left the rostrum to applause, loud shouts of approval. Franklin was surprised, looked toward Adams, who returned the look, shook his head. The chamber was dismissed, and Franklin pushed himself slowly up out of the chair. He began to struggle a bit, pain in both knees, the stiffness holding him tightly, felt a hand under his arm. 'Allow me, sir.' Adams helped him up, commenting as he did so, 'We have a substantial lack of backbone in this room, I'm afraid.' Franklin looked past him, saw Dickinson standing close behind, staring angrily at Adams, reacting to his words. 'Mr. Dickinson, a fine speech, sir, ' said Franklin. Adams seemed suddenly embarrassed, did not look behind him, nodded quickly to Franklin, moved away toward the entrance. Franklin saw Dickinson following Adams, began to follow himself. My God, let's not have a duel. He slipped through the crowd of delegates, making polite acknowledgments left and right, still keeping his eye on Dickinson. The man was gone now, following Adams out of the hall. Franklin reached the door, could see them both, heard the taller man call out, saw Adams turn, a look of surprise. Franklin moved closer, heard Adams say, 'My apologies for my indiscreet remark, sir. However, I am certain you are aware of my sentiments.' Dickinson seemed to explode in Adams' face. 'What is the reason, Mr. Adams, that you New England men oppose our measures of reconciliation? Why do you hold so tightly to this determined opposition to petitioning the king?' Franklin heard other men gathering behind him, filling the entranceway, Dickinson's volume drawing them. He could see Adams glancing at them and then saying, 'Mr. Dickinson, this is not an appropriate time... ' 'Mr. Adams, can you not respond? Do you not desire an end to talk of war?' Adams seemed struck by Dickinson's words, looked at him for a long moment. 'Mr. Dickinson, if you believe that all that has fallen upon us is merely talk, I have no response. There is no hope of avoiding a war, sir, because the war has already begun. Your king and his army have seen to that. Please, excuse me, sir.' Adams began to walk away, and Franklin could see Dickinson look back at the growing crowd behind him, saw a strange desperation in the man's expression, and Dickinson shouted toward Adams, 'There is no sin in hope!

Jeff Shaara
dickinson-left-rostrum-to-applause-loud-shouts-approval-franklin-was-surprised-looked-toward-adams-who-returned-look-shook-his-head-the-chamber-was-dismissed-franklin-pushed-hims
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